William Herzkey Tombow
William Herzkey Tombow
My Family Tree, by Patrick Tombeau, PhD White Feather
White Feather

Moses D. Trombley

Moses D. Trombley

Male 1843 - 1926  (82 years)

Personal Information    |    Media    |    Notes    |    All    |    PDF

  • Name Moses D. Trombley 
    Born 31 Oct 1843  Oldport, MI Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Gender Male 
    Died 2 May 1926  Newport, MI Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Buried St. Charles, Newport, MI Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Person ID I07038  Tombeau Family Tree
    Last Modified 24 Feb 2007 

    Father John Baptiste Trombley,   b. 22 Feb 1803, St. Regis, Huntingdon County, NY/ ON/QC,Canada borders Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 5 Apr 1877, St Charles Parish, Newport, MI Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 74 years) 
    Mother Mary Baumier,   b. 17 Jan 1816, Detroit, MI Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 23 Feb 1899, Newport, Monroe County, MI Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 83 years) 
    Married 28 Apr 1835  St. Antoine de la Riviere aux Raisins (now St. Mary), Monroe, MI Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Family ID F1367  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family Mary Van Washenova,   b. 8 Dec 1856, Monroe, Mi Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 1946, Newport, MI Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 89 years) 
    Married 5 Mar 1878  St. Patrick's Church, Carleton, MI Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Children 
    +1. Minnie Trombley,   b. 25 Apr 1885, Newport, Berlin Twp., MI Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 9 Oct 1974, Newport, Berlin Twp., MI Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 89 years)
     2. Female Trombley,   b. 11 Jan 1884, Berlin Twp., Monroe Co., MI Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 11 Jan 1884, Berlin Twp., Monroe Co., MI Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 0 years)
     3. Madeleane Trombley,   b. Apr 1895
    Family ID F2639  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

  • Photos
    Moses D. Trombley
    Moses D. Trombley
    St. Charles Church History page 23
    St. Charles Church History page 23

    Documents
    St. Charles Church History page 107
    St. Charles Church History page 107
    St. Charles Church History page 106
    St. Charles Church History page 106

    Headstones
    Headstones of Moses D. Trombley and Mary Washenova Trombley
    Headstones of Moses D. Trombley and Mary Washenova Trombley
    Also pictured is their home

  • Notes 
    • The information on Moses D. Trombley and his family comes from the St. Charles Church, Newport, MI, Church History, published in 1930. Pictures of Moses and his wife can be found in this book, as well as those of her parents, the Van Washenovas.

      "Mose Trombley, the son of John and mary Trombley, was born in Old Port, October 31, 1843. Mrs. Trombley (nee Mary Van Washenova), the daughter of Charles and Dorothy Van Washenova, was born December 8, 1856.

      "Mr. and Mrs. Trombley were married at St. Patrick's Church, Carleton (MI) on March 5, 1878. Two children were born, only one of who survives, namely Mrs. Henry (Minnie) Mercure.

      "Mr. Trombley was not only interested in farming, but gave a goodly share of his time to political affairs of the township. In the course of his life he was township clerk, justice of the piece, deputy sheriff, health officer and school board member, He was a fervent Catholic and gave his finacial support to the shcool and church."

      Burial was at St. Charles, Newport, MI, with his wife, Mary, according to DAR records of Monroe Cemeteries.

      From a newspaper clipping held by Moses' daughter Minnie Trombely Mercure in the 1960's. It is titled and dated only: Old Port Man Jan. 20:

      "One of the most interesting reports received in connection with the log cabin query was that of Mose Trombley of Oldport. Mr. Trombl;ey was born in a log cabin at Oldport on October 31, 1843, and spent most of his life in that vicinity. He was born in the pioneer days when teh country was still heavy timber and Indians weere camping. Deer, wild turkeys, and sometimes wolves, wee in the forests. The old log house had two rooms, one for a kitchen and general use and the othr for a bedroom, and also an attic that was used a s a bedroom. A ladder was used to get to the attic. There was a big open fire place which was used for cooking and heating. The old cabin has since been replaced by a frame house and the old log stable has been replacesd by a frame building.

      "In those days there were no matches or oil lamps. Candles were used for light and if the fire wnet out it was necessary to fire from the neigbors. Matches and oil lamps came on the market in the ealy fities (1850's) Matches were sold in square blocks, cut both ways, and containing fifty matches which sold for ten cents a block.

      "People spent evenings together playing cards, singing, dancing, and enjoying lunches together. In the summer time many hours were spent in clearing the land and then the brush was heaped up to make big bonfires.

      "Mr. Trombley received his first schooling in a little log house in the clearing near the edge of the woods. This school house had small windows. There were benches along the side of the room, a box, a stove, a chair, and a desk, used by the teacher. The teacher always had an ugly looking strap at the side of her desk. The teacher boarded around with the parents of the pupils. Mr. Trombley reclls viidly all of his experiences in the pioneer days with ox carts and muddy roads, when many of the modern conveniences were not even thought of."

      Another newspaper article held my Minnie Trombley Mercure in the 1960's was simply titled with no date: ""Old Port Man Is Lincoln Voter":

      "Moses D. Trombley of Oldport reported to the NEWS today that he cast his first
      for Abraham Lincoln in 1864. The voting booth was located in a small log house of Bostic Chapman. Mr. Trombley was born during the pioneer days on October 31, 1843 when Indians were camping and wolves and deer roamed in the forest. He educated himself and taught school for several years. He was justice of the peace for 27 years., school director for 24 years, a reporter for the United States Department of Agriculture 10 years. He followed the occupation of farming as his principlebusiness until he built a house at Oldport and retired."