William Herzkey Tombow
William Herzkey Tombow
My Family Tree, by Patrick Tombeau, PhD White Feather
White Feather

Jacques de la Voye

Male 1669 - 1752  (82 years)


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  • Name Jacques de la Voye 
    Born 30 Sep 1669  Chateau Richer, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Gender Male 
    Died 3 Jan 1752  Petite Riviere, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Person ID I00036  Tombeau Family Tree
    Last Modified 24 Feb 2007 

    Father Rene de la Voye, Jr.,   b. 28 Nov 1628, Saint-Maclou Parish, Rouen, Normandy, France Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 11 Mar 1696, Chateau Richer, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 67 years) 
    Mother Anne Godin,   b. 18 Oct 1639, LaRochelle, France Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 27 Feb 1678, Quebec, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 38 years) 
    Married 19 Apr 1656  Quebec, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Family ID F0047  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family Margeurite Angelique Garand,   b. 13 May 1686, Isle d'Orleans, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 17 May 1718, Baie-St-Paul, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 32 years) 
    Married 15 Feb 1706  Baie-St-Paul, Cananda Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Children 
    +1. Francois LaVoy or de la Voye, I,   b. 8 Apr 1709, Baie-St-Paul, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Aft 1776, Baie-St-Paul, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age > 68 years)
    Family ID F0046  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

  • Documents
    French Canadian Hometowns of the LaVoy Family
    French Canadian Hometowns of the LaVoy Family

  • Notes 
    • The Next Generation: Jacques de la Voye

      The fifth child of the eight born to Rene de la Voye, Jr., and Anne Godin was Jacques de la Voye. He was born 30 September 1669 in the family cabin on the property of his parents that fronted on the St. Lawrence River in Sainte-Anne-de- Beaupre.

      From Joseph A. LaVoie in his book, La Famille Lavoie au Canada, we learn many interesting details of his adult life. In January, 1700, now nearly 31 years old and still unmarried, he sold the land he inherited from his parents to his brother- in-law for "110 livres and a cow at least two years old" and moved east down the St. Lawrence River to a small village, La Petite Riviere Saint-Francois-Xavier to join his oldest brother, Rene. He lived with his brother's family helping with the farm work for six years until he married.

      Jacques married twice as the result of his first wife's death and had twelve children by two wives. His first wife, from whom the LaVoys of Monroe County are descended, was Marguerite-Angelique Garand, the daughter of Pierre Garand and Catherine Labrecque.

      Jacques and Marguerite-Angelique were married at Petite-Riviere on Monday 15 February 1706. Marrying on Monday seems to have been a frequent custom of the Franch-Canadians. Perhaps its symbolic significance was the fact that it was the beginning of a new week much as the couple's marriage was the beginning of their life together.

      Marguerite-Angelique was born 13 May 1686 on L'Isle-d'Orleans, P.Q., Canada. After bearing five children, she died 17 May 1718 at Baie-St-Paul four days past her 32nd birthday.

      At the time of their wedding she was 19 and Jacques was 36. Again, like his father before him, Jacques "robbed the cradle" for a wife.

      Fifteen months after the death of his first wife Jacques remarried to a widow, Marie Barbeau, who had a child by a previous marriage. Jacques and Marie had another seven children bringing into the world a total of 13 children between them.

      Jacques' children by his first wife were: Jacques, Jr., Francois, Marie-Joseph, Jean, and Angelique.

      The Monroe County LaVoys are descended from Francois.

      With his second wife, Jacques had the following children: Marie Louise, Rosalie, Pierre, Rene-Roch, Barthelemi-Augustin, Genevieve, and Marie-Desanges.

      With two brothers producing numerous children in a small village, the LaVoy Family became well entrenched in town life. Jacques' nephew, Michel de la Voye, became a royal notary and a lake in the mountains near the town was named Lac Lavoie.

      Jacques appears to have been quite industrious in maintaining a livelihood. He cultivated the land, cleared forests, ran a saw mill and fished for eels and porpoises.

      Because he was required by law to provide for the minor child of his first marriage, in 1736, at age 67, Jacques had his estate appraised, giving us an insight not only into how well he did for himself, but a glimpse into an 18th Century French-Canadian's household.

      He had two parcels of land, each eight acres. On one parcel he had built a two room wooden house, a dairy barn, a grain barn, stables, and a saw mill.

      The furnishings in his house were strange both for what was found in the house and what was not. It is not a pretty sight.

      One of his two rooms, the one on the side of the house, was filled with "nothing of value". If this was the bedroom, there were no chests-of drawers and no beds, leaving us to assume that he and his wife slept on ticks filed with hay.

      In the main room on entering it, one found a strange conglomeration of objects. The eating and cooking ware consisted of two iron pots, one iron skillet, 11 tin spoons, 2 tin plates, 3 earthen pots, 2 earthware plates, one earthwear basin, and a sieve. There was also a spinning wheel in the room, but no mention is made of a table or chairs.

      Jacques kept the following things in this same room: one saw, one file, one plane, a tin lantern, three sickles, some old scrap iron, two axes, two hatchets, a gun and its powder flask, an iron bound chest , four horse shoes, various barrels, a harness, and a plough with harness.

      In his yard he kept fishing equipment for eels and porpoises and a number of cords of chopped wood.

      His complement of farm animals reminds us of "The Twelve Days of Christmas". He had four nursing sows, four piglets, four sheep, four geese, three hens, two cows, two young bulls, one brood mare, and a turkey hen.

      In his mill he kept fifteen bushels of flour, one old winnowing basket, 2 half barrels, a cart and some small tubs.

      Jacques died at the ripe old age of 82 and was buried on 3 January 1752 in Petite-Riviere. It is Jacques who first begins to sign his name without the particle "de" in our family.