William Herzkey Tombow
William Herzkey Tombow
My Family Tree, by Patrick Tombeau, PhD White Feather
White Feather

Notes


Matches 1 to 50 of 2,135

      1 2 3 4 5 ... 43» Next»

 #   Notes   Linked to 
1 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. LaVoy, Christina Theresa (I09034)
 
2



The Descendants of Lydia A. Tombow and Benjamin N. Groff

The descendants of Benjamin N. Groff and Lydia Ann Tombow were also traced by Dorothy Tombow Boulware, RR 2, Box 311-B, Argyle, TX, in her book "Tambos Tombo Tombow from 1780's Smith, Weaver/Bowers, Groff, Rudy, Cope" (1992), published by Timber Creek Ltd., RT. 1, Box 242, Miami, OK 74354. A copy of this book may be found in the Lancaster Mennonite Historical Society Library.The descendants of Benjamin N. Groff and Lydia Ann Tombow were also traced by Dorothy Tombow Boulware, RR 2, Box 311-B, Argyle, TX, in her book "Tambos Tombo Tombow from 1780's Smith, Weaver/Bowers, Groff, Rudy, Cope" (1992), published by Timber Creek Ltd., RT. 1, Box 242, Miami, OK 74354. A copy of this book may be found in the Lancaster Mennonite Historical Society Library.

It has been pointed out previously in the chapter on the Origins of the Family that the founding parents, William Tombos and Mary Ann Herzkey, had six children: John Tombow, William Tombow, Jr., Mary Ann Tombow, Sarah Tombow, Lydia Tombow, and Catherine Tombow (Miscellaneous Documents. Lancaster County Orphans Court, September, l858, pp. l78-l79).

This chapter discusses the descendants of William and Mary Herzkey Tombos' fifth child, Lydia A. Tombow and her husband, Benjamin N. Groff of Lancaster County, Pennsylvania.

Lydia Tombow was born l8 April l822 according to the records of Mellinger's Cemetery on Lincoln Highway in E. Lancaster, where Lydia is buried. She lived out her childhood years on the property owned by her parents described in the Chapter on the Origins of the Family.

She was married to Benjamin N. Groff in Holy Trinity Lutheran Church in the city of Lancaster, as Lydia Tombo, on 6 April l84l. Their marriage took place in a Lutheran Church because the State required Mennonites to use ordained clergy for their marriages. Lydia's parents, maternal grandparents, and sister, Sarah, to her first husband, Amos N. Bowers, had been married at this church before her.

Benjamin N. Groff was born l3 April l820 according to the records of Mellinger's Cemetery where he is buried next to his wife. A Benjamin Groff family lived a few farms away from Lydia's parents in the l840 Federal Census. A search of Wills for this older Benjamin Groff may determine who Benjamin N. Groff's parents were.

Four years after their marriage, on 26 March l845, Lydia's parents sold an acre of land to Benjamin (Q-l0-397,398). This land was roughly in the shape of a rectangle, 3l8.l5 feet by l36.95 feet, fronting on the old Philadelphia Turnpike Road in East Lampeter Township. The selling price was $l50. There is no mention of buildings on the land, but there is mention of rights to water and water courses which suggests a stream or perhaps just a well existed on the property.

It was on this land that Benjamin and Lydia raised their numerous children as it is not until 3l March l885, nine months after the death of Lydia, that Benjamin sells this piece of land. (Deeds, T-l2-l39) Benjamin Groff appears as the head of a family for the first time in the l850 Federal Census for Lancaster County, E. Lampeter Township, Pennsylvania (dwelling #ll4), adjacent to the land of his father-in-law and his brother-in-law, William Tombow, Jr. Census data is as of the date 28 August l850:

Benjamin Groff, 29 years, laborer, real estate value: $700, born in PA.
Lydia Groff, age 27 years, born in PA
Catherine M. Groff, 8 years, born in PA
Calvin J. Groff, 7 years, born in PA
Cidney S. Groff (female), 5 years old, born in PA
Benjamin Groff, Jr., 2 years, born in PA
William, l year, born in PA

In the l860 Federal Census the following entries for Benjamin and Lydia Tombow Groff and their children have been located:

E. Lampeter Township, Lancaster Co., PA, dwelling 260 p 347, 25 June l860:

Benjamin N. Groff, age 38, laborer, real estate valued at $850, personal property at $350.
Lydia Groff, age 36, born PA
William Groff, age ll, born PA
Lydia Groff, age 9, born PA
Robert Groff, age 7, born PA
Freeland Groff, age 5, born in PA
John Groff, age 3, born PA
Mary Groff, age 8/l2, born PA

Benjamin and Lydia Tombow Groff's son, Calvin, reported in the l850 Census with his parents, is reported in E. Lampeter Township, dwelling 272, page 359, with the John Freelich Family. He is listed as age l9.

Benjamin T. Groff and Sidney Groff are reported in the entry of their maternal aunt and uncle Robert and Catherine Tombow Wilson, as follows:

l860 Federal Census, W. Lampeter Township, Lancaster County, PA. p. 808, dwelling #l33:

Robert Wilson, age 4l, farmer, born PA, estate valued at $600
Catherine Wilson, age 35, born in PA
Benjamin T. Groff, age l3, born in PA
Sidney Groff, age l5, born PA
Isaac Gann (?), l9, farmer, born PA

Catherine M. Groff, Benjamin and Lydia Tombow Groff's oldest child, married Henry M. Zendt 28 February l860 in E. Lampeter township, according to a biographical sketch of the couple found in Chapman Brothers' Portrait and Biographical Album of Whiteside County, Illinois, p. 352.

Her entry for the l860 Census would be found under Henry M. Zendt's Household.

No further Census work has been done for members of this family.

A rare glimpse into the lives of the early Tombows is afforded by an l864 letter, written by Benjamin and Lydia Tombow Groff to her brother John's widow, Sarah Smith Tombow. A copy of this letter accompanies this History. The text reads as follows: (The original spelling in the letter has been maintained.)

"Mount Rock February first l864

Dear friend Sarah I take the pleasure of dropping a few lines to you to let you no that we are all reasonabel well at presant The children all had the measels but they are all pretty well again and I and Lydia are midling well. Lydia has not been well for some time but I hope she will soon be well again. We have hird with much sarow to all that William (John and Sarah's son) was cilled and Nathaniel (Tombow, another son) seariusly wounded. Dear friend this is sad tidings for us all to here but it is very harde for you to lose your boys in this way. But we must bare with it as it seems to be our lot and misfortune of this cruel war (The Civil War). But it is the will of god and bair all in good faith and trust in him that giveth and taketh away.

"But dear friend be comforted in all things and all will be well with you. I showed Smith (Thomas Smith who married Mary Ann Tombow and to whom John and Sarah Tombow sold there land before leaving Lancaster County, PA to live in E. Greenville, Ohio) the letter that Margret (Tombow, a daughter of John and Sarah Tombow) rote to me and it rased his temper but I told him that I thought that she did not say anything out of the way. But he should have said that he would come out and see hir and he said he would make it a dear lesson to her. But I sapose he has cooled off as I here nothing about it at all and I think he would get the dearest part of the afair as I now that he did not do rite in all things with John. I ast him if he gave John that hundred dollars and he said he did not but he did not no what he would do yet. But I donte thinke he will give anything as he did not doo it before this time.

And Lydia says she thinkes that Smith would get his match if he got in contact with Margret. She says I should stick to her brother to the last as she is in the rite. Lydia says that Margret gave Smith just what he deserved to get. (T)he friends are all well as far as I no. Mary Ann (Tombow) Smith is bad of. She is nearly blinde. Hir eyes are verry bad. Catharin (Groff, their oldest child who married Henry M. Zendt) as going to Sterling, Elanois, and Frank is going along also. And I expect our children will all go out west. We should all like to see you all and I hope the time may cum when we can all see each other once more. So no more. Friends all you must forgive me for my cairlesnes of not riting sooner but I have so much on my minde that I am cairles I no but I shall try to doo better in future. We all sende our love to you Lydia in particular to you and the girls. So no more for this time. Pleas rite soon and let us no all about the boys and all the rest of the famely. "From Ben. and Lydia Groff

"Yours truly Sarah Tombow and children. So good nite."

The original of this remarkable letter is held by the great-great granddaughter of John and Sarah Smith Tombow, Dorothy Tombow Boulware of Argyle, Texas.

When Benjamin Groff sold the land which he had purchased from his father-in-law, William Tombos, in l845, Benjamin is listed as an auctioneer living in E. Lampeter Township. He sold his land to Daniel W. Meyers for $l300. At that time a house and stable were on the property and reference was again made to waters and water courses on the land. (Deeds, T-l2-l39)

Benjamin was 65 years old at the time of the sale, and was to live another five years. It is not known at this time with whom he lived, but it was probably one of his children.

Lydia Tombow Groff died 26 July l884 and Benjamin N. Groff died 20 March l890, according to the records of Mellinger's Mennonite Cemetery in E. Lancaster, Pennsylvania. They are buried in row l3.

A search for a Will for Banjamin N. Groff in the Lancaster County Court House archives was negative. No obituary has been found in the Lancaster County papers by the Lancaster County Historical Society for Benjamin N. Groff or Lydia Tombow Groff.

Benjamin and Lydia Tombow Groff had the following children according to the l850 and l860 Federal Censuses ( A search of the l870 Census may report further children born after l860):

V-l Catherine M. Groff, reported above in the l850 Census, was born 24 September l84l in E. Lampeter Township, according to the Chapman Brothers' book, cited above in this chapter, p. 352-3. at the age of l0, she was removed from the care of her parents and raised to womanhood by strangers, according to the above mentioned source.

She married Henry M. Zendt, born 2l February l825 in Baden, Germany, the son of Jacob Zendt and Elizabeth Down. Catherine Groff and Henry M. Zendt married 28 February l860. Henry Zendt ran a carriage business in Lancaster County for l2 years before relocating with his wife and family in Sterling, Whiteside County, Illinois in the Spring of l864.

The couple were Mennonites and Mr Zendt was a deacon in the Mennonite Church. Further information about this couple can be found in the accompanying article from the Chapman Brothers' book.

The following children were born of this union according to the above source:

V-1-1 Franklin G. Zendt, born 5 January l86l; died l June l864.

V-1-2 Lydia A. Zendt, born l8 October l863.

V-l-3 Mary M. Zendt, born l6 June l866.

V-l-4 Naomi T. Zendt, born 2l April l859 (probably l869 in view of marriage date of parents); died l7 May l873.

V-l-5 John G. Zendt, born 23 October l87l.

Marriages of the surviving children may be found in the Whiteside County (IL) index to pre-l9l6 marriages in the possession of Arlene T. Onken, Whiteside County, Illinois, historian and genealogist.

Nothing further is known about this family at this writing beyond what is written in the Chapman Brothers' book cited above.

V-2 Calvin J. Groff, born l843, according to the l850 Census and l84l according to the l860 Census. Calvin J. Groff may have been in the Civil war because of his age and his military and pension papers should be sought for further information.

V-3 Sidney S. Groff (female) born l845, according to both the l850 and l860 Censuses. Nothing further known. Marriages in First Reformed and Trinity Lutheran should be searched for her marriage.

V-4 Benjamin T. Groff, born l848, according to the l850 Census or l847 according to the l860 Census. Despite his age, he may have served in the Civil War toward the later years and his military and pension papers should be sought from the National Archives.

V-5 William Groff, born l849 in both the l850 and the l860 Census. His marriage might have occurred in Lancaster County for further information and the Soundex may find this family because in l880 his children would have been under the age of l0.

V-6 Lydia Groff, born l85l, according to the l860 Census. Her marriage may be found in the Reformed Church or Trinity Lutheran Church records.

V-7 Robert Groff, born l853, according to the l860 Census. His marriage may be found in the Reformed or Trinity Lutheran Churches. If he remained in Lancaster his family may be found in the l880 Soundex as his children would be under l0.

V-8 Freeland Groff (male), born l855, according to the l860 Census. Marriage and the l880 Soundex should be researched.

V-9 John Groff, born l857, according to the l860 Census. Marriage Indexes for Lancaster County and the l880 Soundex should be reviewed for further information.

V-l0 Mary Groff, born l860, two months old at time of Census. Marriage indexes of Reformed and Trinity Lutheran Churches should be reviewed for her marriage.

Nothing further is known at this writing of this branch of the Benjamin N. Groff and Lydia Tombow Family and its descendants.

Ads placed in The Genealogical Helper (Sept/Oct, l989) and Pennsylvania Mennonite Heritage magazine in l990 for descendants of this branch of the Tombow Family have not been answered as of this writing. 
Tombow, Lydia Ann (I07259)
 
3

The Descendants of Mary Ann Tombow and James A. Morrison

II-2: Mary Ann Tombow was the second of the nine children of William Tombow, Jr., and Elizabeth Rohrer of Lancaster County, Pennsylvania. She was the granddaughter of the founding couple, William Tombos, an immigtant from the Netherlands, and Mary Ann Herzkey who was born in the U.S. of German parentage. Mary Ann Tombow was probably named for her paternal grandmother, Mary Ann Herzkey Tombos.

Mary Ann Tombow was born about 1842 according to the 1850 Federal Census of Lancaster County, Pennsylvania, where we first catch sight of her. She is recorded in her paternal grandfather's entry in E. Lampeter Township, dwelling #116, p. 202, under the name of "Dombo", a Germanic corruption of the family name, Tombo. The entry was taken on 28 August 1850:

Dombo, William, 61 years, farmer, real estate valued at $2,500.
Dombo, Elizabeth, 54 years, born in Pennsylvania
Dombo, Samuel, l4 (?) years, born in Pennsylvania, attends school
Dombo, Mary, 8 years, born in Pennsylvania, attends school
Wilson, Robert, 32 years, laborer, born in Pennsylvania
Wilson, Catherine, 25 years, born in Pennsylvania.

In this entry, Mary is living with the Family Patriarch, his second wife, Elizabeth Foos, whom he married after his first wife, Mary Ann Herzkey died in l848; her older brother, Samuel, who is actually 10 years old, and her uncle and aunt, Robert and Catherine Tombow Wilson.

We note that she is still in school. The custom of the time was to go to school until the age of 10.

Mary's mother, Elizabeth Rohrer, died in the Spring of 1853, when Mary was l0-11 years old. Her father, William, Jr., remarried to a woman named Fanny almost immediately, put up his property for sale and left for Whiteside County, Illinois.

Despite her age, Mary was left behind in Pennsylvania with friends or relatives of her father's.

Mary is still in Pennsylvania in 1860, according to the Federal Census of Lancaster County of that year. She is listed as age 18, living with the Jacob L. and Ann Landis Family, as a servant (p.363, dwelling #370). Found in 1860 Federal Census for E. Lampeter, Lacaster Co., PA, p363. dwelling 363, with Jacob Landis Family. Jacob Landis was a forwarding merchant, age 36 with real property valued at $20,000 and personal at $500. His wife Anna was 35 and he had two sons, B.F. and P.E. Landis, ages 14 and 12, respectively. Another woman, Naomi Weal, age 25, lived with them.

Subsequently, between 1860 and 1865, Mary Ann joined her younger brothers and sisters, father and step-mother, Fanny, in Whiteside County, Illinois, where she married James A, Morrison in 1865.

The evidence that Mary Ann Tombow is the daughter of William Tombow, Jr. and Elizabeth Rohrer is found in three separate records: in the 1852-55 Lancaster County Register of Births, Deaths, and Marriages on the occasion of her younger brother William's birth in 1852. Secondly, she is mentioned as an heir to her father's estate in the 1865 proceedings in the Whiteside County (IL) Circuit Court to settle his estate (Letters of Administration). The third mention occurs in papers filed by David F. Kauffman in Whiteside County Circuit Court on 2 March 1904 against the heirs of William Tombow, Jr., to obtain clear title to William's property, who had died 39 years before without a will (General No. 1727, Whiteside County Circuit Court). The details of this case may be found in the Family History in the section narrating the events in the life of William Tombow, Jr.

Mary signed a quit claim to her father's property mentioned above, along with her husband, James Morrison, on 13 February 1901, to Benjamin Bott. Her husband acted with the power of attorney for her and her sister Elizabeth Tombow Groff. (Whiteside County (IL) Deeds, Book 161, p. 56)

The next phase of Mary Ann Tombow's life is learned from the Civil War pension papers of her husband, James A. Morrison. These papers are quite extensive, amounting to about 80-90 pages. But as many of them are repetitious, only a few have been copied for this history.

Mary Ann Tombow married James A. Morrison on 18 September 1865 in Sterling, Illinois, three and a half months after his discharge in Annapolis, Maryland, on 29 May 1865. As James was born in Lancaster County and enlisted there, such a speedy marriage suggests that he had courted her in Lancaster County while he was a soldier.

According to his pension papers, James A. Morrison was born 16 May 1839, Lancaster County, Pennsylvania. At the age of 22, he enlisted on 5 June 1861, a few weeks after the outbreak of the Civil War when shots were filed on Ft. Sumter. He signed up for Company D of the 34th Regiment of the Voluntary Infantry and went to "boot camp" at Harrisburg, PA.

He was discharged at the end of his service from this unit on 22 December 1863 and re-enlisted the next day in Co. D of the 191st Volunteer Regiment where he remained until his discharge after War's end in 1865.

During the Civil War, Morrison was captured twice and sustained minor injuries detailed in anatomical drawings found in his pension papers. He was listed as a "machinist" during the war. In civilian life, he was a house painter and paper-hanger, as his pension papers indicate and entries in the Sterling-Rock Falls city directories indicate. City Directories indicate.

In the early days of their marriage, James and Mary Tombow Morrison lived with his parents, James, Sr., and Elizabeth, in Rock Falls, IL (1870 Census, entry 3/3) and Coloma, IL, (entry 27/27, 1880 Census).

The 1880 entry indicates that the elder James Morrison was 80 years old making the year of his birth about 1800. His entry indicates that he was born in Pennsylvania. His wife's entry indicates that she was 74 years old, making her birth year 1806, and that she too was born in PA. The 1870 Census indicates that their estate was worth $7100 and that he was a machinist in a factory (probably the wire factory in Rock Falls).

Three of James, Jr., and Mary's children are also mentioned in the 1880 entry: William, age 13, A.G., age 3, and Libbie (Lillian?), age 1. Their second child, Walter S. Morrison, who would have been 12 to 13 years old at this time, since he is not listed, must have been "farmed out" to another family, as was often the custom.

Shortly after this, James and Mary must have moved to their own home as the Sterling-Rock Falls City Directory for 1881-85 indicates that James Morrison, painter, lives on the SW corner of the intersection of South and Payson Streets in Rock Falls (IL). His father, James, Sr., is noted as boarding with him, suggesting that the elder's wife, Ellis, had died within the last year. No other entries for Morrison families are found in these directories between l881-1885.

The 1890 City Directory shows an entry in Rock Falls for James A. Morrison, painter, who resides on Main on the SW corner of its intersection with Gray. As his father is not mentioned, it may be presumed that he died between 1885-1890 at a ripe old age.

The 1895-96 City Directories show three entries for the Morrison Family in Rock Falls. James A. Morrison, painter, is living on the west side of Gray one hose south of Main.

His son, Alfred Morrison, is listed as a hostler, residing on Main near Gray. His son, William E. Morrison, is listed as a clerk, living in a house on the NW corner of Galt and North.

The 1898 City Directory for Rock Falls has two entries for the Morrison Family, James Morrison, paper hanger, lives on the NE corner of North and Hayes. His son, William, is listed as a grocer, living on the NW corner of Galt and North.

The 1901 City Directory for Rock Falls has two entries for the Morrison Family. J. A. Morrison, painter, is living at 612 W. 5th St. with his wife Mary and son, Alfred G., who is listed as a machinist.

In this same year, William E. Morrison is listed as living at 408 Galt Ave. with his wife, Adda and his children, Carol and Cecil.

The 1900 Federal Census for Whiteside County, IL, notes James Morrison as in the 1st Ward of Rock Falls in entry 127/132. He is listed as a house painter, living with his wife Mary and son Alfred G, age 23, who is a machinist.

The 1908 Rock Falls City Directory lists James and his wife Mary as living at 304 8th Avenue.

The pension papers describe Morrison as as 5'7«" tall at the time of enlistment with grey eyes and a dark complexion. No picture of James or Mary are known at this writing to have survived.

Mary Ann Tombow Morrison died 19 April 1908 and is buried in the IOOF Cemetery in Rock Falls in the Morrison Family Plot with a stone to mark her grave. Her stone gives her dates as 1841-1908. She was 67-68 years old at the time of her death. (Date of death obtained from her husband's Civil War Pension Papers.)

An obituary is said to exist, but has yet to be found. An abstract of this obituary was taken by a Rock Falls, IL, genealogist. The notes of this researcher are currently in the possession of Sarah Boze, 605 E. Fifth St., Rock Falls, IL. The Sterling (IL) Gazette was searched by the Librarian in Sterling, but no notice found.

After her death, James began living off and on in the Old Soldiers' and Sailors' Home in Quincy, Illinois, where he died at the age of 84 on 19 December 1923 of chronic heart problems. He was buried the next day in the Home's Cemetery at 1 o'clock in the afternoon in Division 2, row 7. He has a stone to mark his grave.

The pension papers indicate that Mary Ann Tombow and James A. Morrison had four children: William E. Morrison, Walter S. Morrison, Alfred G. Morrison, and Lillian May Morrison.

II-2-1: William E. Morrison was born 15 August 1866 in Sterling, IL, according to his father's pension papers and an obituary in a Broken Bow, Nebraska, newspaper. He met his future wife, Addie Wallace in the late eighties in Custer County where she taught in the country schools near Anselmo, Nebraska, according to the same obituary.

Addie Wallace was born 5 January 1870 in McConnelsville, Ohio, the daughter of Capt. and Mrs. George Wallace, according to her 19 March 1953 obituary in the Sterling Daily Gazette. (Her father was a river boat captain, according to a newspaper article copied for this history.)

William E. Morrison and Addie Wallace were married 6 November 1890 in Rock Falls, IL, according to the same obituary.

William E Morrison and his Family are listed in the 1900 Federal Census for Whiteside County, IL, in Ward 1 of Rock Falls (Entry 130/135), He is listed as a meat grocer. He is living with this wife and two children, Cecil and Carol.

The city directories indicate that the family lived for several years at 408 Galt Ave, Rock Falls, and that his grocery store, Hubbard and Morrison, was located at 205 W. Second St. in the same city.

William was a member of the Methodist Church, an ardent member of the International Order Odd Fellows, and a prominent business man in Rock Falls, IL, in the grocery business. In failing health, he left Rock Falls for Denver, Colorado, where he caught mountain fever, and was forced to move to a lower altitude in Broken Bow, Nebraska. There he ran the Sanitary Meat Market for two years until his sudden death of a heart attack at the age of 44 on 20 July 1911 (Broken Bow, NB, obituary). He was buried in the I.O.O.F. Cemetery in Rock Falls, Il.

Prior to his business in Broken Bow, in addition to his grocery business in Rock Falls, he also attempted a grocery business in Chicago, but was burnt out and returned to Rock Falls, according to a newspaper account copied for this history.

Adda Pearl Wallace Morrison died 18 March 1953, at the age of 83. She also is buried in the Morrison Family burial plot (Section 9, lot 24) in the I.O.O.F.Cemetery in Rock Falls.

William E. Morrison and Addie Wallace had four known children: Bertha Morrison, Cecil Lyle Morrison, Carol Morrison, and an infant.

!!-2-1-l: Bertha Morrison, born most likely in Rock Falls, IL, on 7 Apr. 1893, died in a diphtheria outbreak 30 April 1896 in Rock Falls. She is buried in the Morrison Family Plot in the Rock Falls I.O.O.F Cemetery. Her obituary along with several other children who died at the time has a typographical error, placing her death in 1886 rather than 1896. Her grave is marked with a stone (Section 9, Lot 24, grave 6). A copy of her obituary is found in the Lydia Tombow Fluck Bible owned by Ralph ("Pete") Fluck of Rock Falls, IL.

II-2-1-2: Cecil Lyle Morrison, born Rock Falls, IL, 7 October 1894. He worked as a dairy man, living in Rock Falls, Sterling, and in his last years, Polo, IL. (Obituary in Sterling (IL) Gazette).

He married at least twice. Of the first marriage one son is known to his half-sister, Cecel (Mrs. John Bradshaw) of O'Fallon, IL.

II-2-1-2-1: George Morrison, P.O. box 61, Princeton, IL.

Cecil Lyle Morrison married a second time on 29 December 1941 in Keokuk, Iowa, to Mary Frances Oyler, born 14 March 1920 in Sterling, IL. Mary Frances died 15 August 1951 and is buried in Polo, IL.

Cecil Lyle Morrison died 5 November 1972 in Polo, IL, and is buried in the Morrison Family plot in the I.O.O.F. Cemetery in Rock Falls, IL (Section 9, Lot 24). (The above information was supplied by Mrs. John Bradshaw (Cecel Morrison) of O'Fallon, IL)

Mrs. Bradshaw states that Cecil L. Morrison and Mary Frances Oyler had four children: William Morrison, Cecel Morrison, Peggy Morrison, and Lyle Morrison.

II-2-1-2-2: William Morrison, born 31 July 1942 , Dixon, IL; joined the marines in 1959 and changed his name from Frank William to William Morrison at that time. At the time of his birth, the family home was located at 501 S. Franklin St., Polo, IL. (Birth Certificate)

William's serial number in the Marines is believed to be 1907891. His current whereabouts is unknown.

William Morrison married Carol. Divorced in Mulberry Grove, IL. William Morrison and Carol had one child, Patrick Carl Morrison.

II-2-1-2-2-1: Patrick Carl Morrison, born 4 August 1973. Resides with mother, Mrs Dennis (Carol) Crippes, on S. Main St., Benton, IL, 62812 (1-618-439-2829).

II-2-1-2-3: Cecel Morrison (female), born 16 September 1944 , Dixon, IL. Married 26 September 1960, Oregon, IL, to John Bradshaw, born 14 April 1944, Dixon, IL, son of John Berry Bradshaw and Betty Miles. John Bradshaw is a tool and die maker. John and Cecel Morrison Bradshaw reside at 1010 Caroline, PO Box 533, O'Fallon, IL. John and Cecel had two children: John Berry Bradshaw and Jay Brian Bradshaw.

II-2-1-2-3-1 John Berry Bradshaw, born and died 16 April 196l in Oregon, IL.

II-2-1-2-3-2: Jay Brian Bradshaw: born 1 September 1966 in Rockford, IL. Resides at home with parents in O'Fallon, IL.

II-2-1-2-4: Peggy Morrison, born 23 January 1946, Dixon, IL; married Arthur Pattat 8 October 1964 in Freeport, IL. Resides 614 W. American, Freeport, IL. Arthur Pattat was born 4 October 1946 in Rockford, IL, the son of Clarence and Voona Pattat. Peggy is a customer service representative. Arthur is a programmer.

Peggy Morrison and Arthur Pattat have three children: Bradley Willam Pattat, Brenda Lee Pattat, and Brian Michael Pattat.

II-2-1-2-4-1: Bradley William Pattat, born 2 December 1964, Freeport, IL Enlisted with the U.S Marines.

II-2-1-2-4-2: Brenda Lee Pattat, born 9 January l966, in Freeport, IL. Resides with parents in Freeport.

II-2-1-2-4-3: Brian Michael Pattat, born 31 August 1969, in Freeport, IL Resides with parents in Freeport.

II-2-1-2-5: Lyle Morrison, born 14 March 1948, Dixon, IL. Married twice: first to Donna Louise Sabin, probably in Freeport, IL. Of this marriage there were three children: Brett Alan Morrison, Billie Jeanette Morrison and Bobbie Joe Morrison (female).

II-2-1-2-5-1: Brett Alan Morrison, born September, l968, Freeport, IL, paternity uncertain.

II-2-1-2-5-2: Billie Jeanette Morrison, born 26 August 1970, Freeport, IL.

II-2-1-2-5-3: Bobbie Joe Morrison, born 25 April 1972 in Freeport, IL.

Lyle Morrison married a second time to Marian Mildred Wierz. Of this marriage, there was one child: Jennifer Renee Morrison.

II-2-1-2-5-4: Jennifer Renee Morrison, born 5 December 1975, Rockford IL

The above information on the descendants of Cecil L. Morrison was supplied by Mrs John Bradshaw, his daughter (Cecel Morrison).

II-2-1-3: Carol Morrison, born 7 May 1897, probably in Rock Falls, IL. She died, age 49 years, on 24 June 1946. She is buried in the Morrison Family Plot in the Rock Falls I.O.O.F. Cemetery, Section 9, Lot 24. She was the third child of William E. Morrison and Addie Wallace and the granddaughter of Mary Ann Tombow and James A. Morrison.

At the time of her death she lived at 1006 West Fourth St, Sterling, IL. She was emloyed as a bookkeeper at the Sterling-Rock Falls Cooperative Association. She was a member of the First Church of Christ, Scientist.

The above information was secured from her obituaries which appeared on 26 June 1946 in the Sterling Gazette.

Carol Morrison married Frank Elliot Bowman, the son of Attorney and Mrs. Frank J. Bowman of Sterling, IL in the Congregationalist parsonage. date unknown. At the time of their marriage, they resided at 207 Eighth Ave., Sterling, IL. (Wedding Announcement)

A 1908 city directory for Sterling indicates that Frank E, Bowman lives at 207 8th Avenue and is in the insurance and loans business.

A home for Attorney Frank J. Bowman is listed in the 1901 city directory as 709 E. 3rd St, Sterling. His office was located in the First National Bank, 13-15 E. 3rd St, Sterling.

Frank E. and Carol Morrison Bowman had one son: Edmund Bowman.

II-2-1-3-1: Edmund Bowman died unmarried. Mrs. Bradshaw states that he shot himself in Chicago and that he owned the Rock Falls home in which his grandmother, Adda Wallace Morrison, lived at the time of his death. This home is said to have been sold at that point to settle his estate.

II-2-1-4: Infant (l900-l900), the fourth child of William E. Morrison and Adda Wallace died as an infant. No name has been found for this infant. Its existence is known only through a stone marking in the Morrison Family Plot, Section 9, lot 24, in the Rock Falls, IL, I.O.O.F. Cemetery.

II-2-2: Walter S. Morrison is the second child of Mary Ann Tombow and James A. Morrison. He was born in 1867 and died at the age of 29 in 1896. Nothing further is known of him or possible descendants at this writing. (James A. Morrison Civil War Pension Papers)

II-2-3: Alfred G. Morrison, the third child of Mary Ann Tombow and James A. Morrison, was born 12 November 1876, probably in Rock Falls, IL., according to the Civil War Pension Papers of his father.

In 19ll, at the time of his older brother William E. Morrison's death he was living in DeKalb, IL.

From 1922 to 1946, when he deeded his property to another, Alfred G. Morrison and his family lived at 1803 W.Third Street in Waterloo, Iowa, according to the street directories of that city. He is listed as an agent with the American Railway Express Agency until he retired in the early 1940's. His wife is listed as as Kathryn L. until 1942 when she no longer appears in the directory, presumably having died in 1940-41. She is listed as a money clerk for the American Railway Express Agency from 1922 to 1928. Therafter she appears to remain at home.

The city directories lists two daughters in addition to his wife, Katherine and Winifred.

II-2-3-l: Katherine E. Morrison. In the 1925 State Census she is mentioned as being a daughter and age 18. This would put her birth in about 1907. Throughout the listings, she remains in her parent's home, unmarried,until the listing disappears after 1946.

II-2-3-2: Winifred C. Morrison, listed as a daughter in this home, age 17, in the 1925 State Census, making her birth year, 1908. In 1930-31 she marries Kenneth R. Morrison, a credit manager at Davidson's. She is listed as a bookkeeper at Pioneer National Bank and then as a cashier at Davidson's.

In 1931 the couple live with her parents. In 1933 they are noted as living at 529 Kinsley Av, then a few years later at 1306 Williston Av. The 1937 entry indicates that they are lving in Grundy Center, Iowa, and in 1939, Kenneth is noted as working for Davidson in Waterloo, Iowa. Thereafter there are no further entries on this couple.

No children are noted in the couple's entry during the years 1931-39.

A review of the 1925 Iowa State Census reveals the following: Alfred G. Morrison served in the Illinois Infantry. He was noted to have no church affiliation, but his wife and daughters were noted to be Catholic. His wife is listed as being 43 years old and born in Illinois, making her birth year about 1882. Her parents are listed as P. A. King and Katherine Coleman, both born in Ireland and married in Rhode Island.

Both the daughters, Katherine and Winifred were born in Illinois in this Census.

The value of the Morrison home in Waterloo is listed as $4,000. His education went to the eighth grade. His wife completed high school. The daughter Katherine appears only to have completed eighth grade, while Winifred was in 12th grade. All four can read and write.

The following searches have been done without positive results: no Will was probated in Blackhawk County for A. G. Morrison. No social security number appears to be have issue to Alfred to help locate where he relocated after selling his house in 1946. No marriages or burials have been found in Catholic Cemeteries in or near Waterloo. No Catholic school records have been found. Perhaps the daughters attended public school despite their Catholic heritage. There is no record of a death in Blackhawk County from 1941 to 1952 for Alfred or his wife, Kathryn L. No marriage records have been found for Winifred or Katherine in the County Records from 1920-1940.

Research on this family in Waterloo, Iowa, was done by Beverly Ogden Ross, 3917 Highland Drive, Waterloo, IA, 50701.

Research in Grundy Center, Grundy County, IA, Alfred's military records and the pension records of the American Railway Agency may find the further whereabouts of this family. Davidson's pension and employment records may also locate the Kenneth and Winifred Morrison Family.

Mrs. Mabel (Winter) Schmidt, a great-niece of James A. Morrison, wrote in a letter, dated 24 July 1989: "In 1924 Winifred (Morrison) and I were juniors in West High in Waterloo (IA). Catherine (Morrison) was mildly retarded and wasn't going to school.

A yearbook picture and entry for 1925 and class reunion addresses may provide further clues in the search.

II-2-4: Lillian May Morrison was the fourth child of Mary Ann Tombeau and James A. Morrison. She was born 5 January 1879, probably in Rock Falls, IL, according to her father's Civil War Pension Papers.

She married twice. Her first husband was William Brooks, from whom she divorced because of his abusive behaviors as the result of chronic alcoholism. The divorce papers filed in Whiteside County, IL, Court House, in Morrison, dated July, 1910 (General File No. 2297), indicate they were married 24 November 1897 and that at the time of filing she was living in Rock Falls. The divorce was finalized on 11 November 19ll.

Of this marriage there were six children, according to the Complaint of Divorce, the oldest being 12 and the youngest being 2 years old. Only two of them are mentioned by name: Howard, age 10, and Bernice, age 2, whom Lillian wishes to keep custody of. The other four children are stated to be adopted out to charitable homes and institutions. The names of these children, except for perhaps one, have been obtained from the 1900 Census and City Directories of the time.

The 1900 Federal Census for Whiteside County, IL, entry 80/83 for Rock Falls, Ward 1, lists William Brooks, age 29, as a machinist. He was born in Illinois. His wife Lillian is listed as age 21, and three children are noted in this entry: Harold, age 2, Howard, age 3 months, born in February, and Clifford, age 10. This latter child's age makes him two old to be the son of Lillian and so he must be a child of a previous marriage of William Brooks.

The 1901 City Directory for Rock Falls lists William Brooks as a foreman with the Dillon Griswold Wire Co and living at 224 Sixth Ave, with his wife Lillian and children Clifford, Harold and Howard.

The 1904 City Directory for Rock Falls lists William Brooks as a machinist living at 109 Grace Ave. with his wife Lillian and his children Clifford and Harold.

The 1906 city directory lists William Brooks as working for the Dillon Griswold Wire Company and living with his wife, Mrs Lily, and his children, Clifford, Howard, a student, Harold, a student, Paul and Melvin.

In the 1908-9 Rock Falls directory, Mrs. Lillian Brooks is shown living without husband or children at 304 8th Ave.

Neither the 1910 city directory nor the 1910 Federal Census for Whiteside County has an entry for Brooks or Reinhart. As members of the Reinhart Family into whci Lillian subsequently married still live in neighboring Lee County, IL, it is possible that Lillian moved to that county at about this time.

Two of the Brooks children are said to have died in World War I of the flu. No record has been found of their enlistment in Whiteside County. It may be that they enlisted in Lee County. A Howard Brooks did enlist from Whiteside, but it appears he belongs to another family.

Melvin Brooks is said by his half-brother Hubert to have worked at the Colonial Bakery in Grand Rapids, MI. Some of the Brooks children may have settled in Twin Lakes, Wisconsin.

Hubert Reinhart, the son of Lillian Morrison by her second marriage confirms the existence of Paul and Melvin. He states another child may be Irene. A Paul Brooks marriage is noted in the Whiteside County records on 25 March 1932 to Mary Lambert, but it is not known if this is the same Paul Brooks as William and Lillian's son.

Some of the children may have been placed in the Peek Home Orphanage in Lee County. Howard was noted in the 1910 Census as adopted out to the Fred P. and Margaret Lahr family, farmers in Montmorency Township (1910 Federal Census, Whiteside County IL, entry 200/200).

Lillian May Morrison married a second time to Benjamin Reinhart after 19ll. Of this marriage there were three children: Benjamin Reinhart, whose son, Tom, lives in Glendale, Utah, 84729, PO Box 173. His phone is 1-801-648-2225.

Benjamin and Lillian Morrison Reinhart's second child is Hubert Reinhart. He was living in l990 at 305 N.E. Burnside #15, Bend, Oregon. In a telephone conversation he states that he has three children: (l) Jerry Reinhart (a son); no children; (2) Ronald Reinhart, who has two children: (a) Tracey Reinhart (no children) and (b) Scott Reinhart (no children); and (3) Benjamin L. Reinhart who has two children (a) Rick Reinhart (no children) and (b) Mark Reinhart (no children).

Hubert Reinhart's telephone is 1-503-389-8448.

A third child of Lillian Mae Morrison and Benjamin Reinhart is Maxine Reinhart. She married George Hancock and lived in Twin Lakes, Wisconsin.

Benjamin Reinhart and Lillian Morrison are buried in Riverside Cemetery in Sterling, IL. She died in the 1940's. Benjamin in the 1960's.

This information on Lillian and Benjamin Reinhart was supplied by Paul C.Reinhart, 1309 14th St, Sterling, IL, who is their nephew, and Hubert Reinhart, their only surviving child.

Nothing further is known at this writing of this branch of the family.

Compiled and written by

Patrick L. Tombeau 13 April 1993  
Tombow, Mary Ann (I04322)
 
4

The LaVoy Family in French Canada


Rene de la Voye, Jr.: The Immigrant Ancestor to the New World

Somewhere around the year 1654, when Rene de la Voye, Jr., was only 21 years old, he forsook his native city and made the several week voyage across the Atlantic and down the St. Lawrence River to settle in the city of Sainte-Anne-de- Beaupre, near Quebec. Quebec was not yet 50 years old at this time, having only been founded in 1608 as the first city in Canada.

Sainte-Anne-de-Beaupre is famous to this day for its miracles and some of the earliest miracles occured there to none other that Rene's parents-in law, Elie Godin and Esther Ramage in 1664 and 1662, respectively.

Two years after he had arrived in the New World Rene de la Voye, Jr., married Anne Godin on 19 April 1656, the eldest daughter of Elie and Esther.

The record of their marriage still exists and is quoted in a French language book on the LaVoy Family, Joseph A. LaVoie's La Famille Lavoie au Canada (The LaVoy Family in Canda). It reads as follows:

"On 19 April 1656, having published their bans of marriage, the Reverend Father
Paul Ragueneau of the Society of Jesus, having the power to do so, married Rene de la Voye, of about 25 years of age, son of Rene de la Voye and Isabeau Belanger of Rouen, of the parish of Saint-Maclou, and Anne Godin, about 15 years old, the daughter of Elie Godin and Esther Ramage, living in Beaupre, in the presence of Etienne Lessar and Claude Poulin, living in the same place as the parents of Anne."

By modern standards the 25 year old Rene had "robbed the cradle" when he married the 15 year old Anne Godin. However, this was often the practice in the early days of French Canada. It probably served two purposes: an older male who had established himself in a trade could better support a wife and a younger wife would have a longer period of fertility to produce children to people the French-Canadian wildernesses. During the reign of King Louis XIV of France, couples were paid the equivalent of $50.00 per child. Hence the tradition of very large French-Canadian families started early in the settlement of Canada.

(This wide disparity in ages continued in the writer's branch of the family down to his great-grandfather, Moses LaVoy, Sr. He married twice. By his first wife he had ten children. Within a few months of her death, at age 40, he married his childen's 25 year old baby sitter, Sarah Knaggs. Moses' oldest daughter, Agnes, was her step-mother's bride's maid. She was 18. By his second wife, Moses had twelve children, for a total of twenty-two, thus upholding the second tradition of large families.)

While the LaVoy Family has been Catholic for centuries in the New World, its origins were, at least momentarily, Huguenot, or French Protestant. Rene's wife, Anne, was baptized in the Calvinist Church at LaRochelle, France, on 18 November 1639.

A year after Rene's marriage to Anne, Fr. Jean de Quen wrote in the Jesuit Relations that he had conducted an abjuration of heresy in his chamber in the presence of Jean Jobin, Pierre du Val and Fr. Chastlaine, according to the formula of the Council of Trent with a boy called Rene Voie.

As Rene's two sisters and brother were baptized Catholics, we are forced to conclude that Rene was raised a Catholic as well, but, perhaps in deference to his new bride, had flirted with Calvinism in such a public manner that he brought himself to the attention of the authorities in the small colony and was forced to recant the error of his ways.

Their marriage occured in Sainte-Anne-du-Petit-Cap-Church, the predecessor church to Sainte-Anne-de-Beaupre.

Rene's occupation was ostensibly that of a farmer. On 18 August 1656 he was given a three year lease on a piece of land with 600 feet or so of river frontage (3 arpents). This land was given over to growing crops and had a cabin on it at the time of lease.

On 7 October 1665 Rene was granted the land in perpetuity. Part of this land lies on the east side of modern Sainte-Anne-de-Beaupre.

Despite being in possession of this land for 11 years in 1667, very little of it was under cultivation according to the Census of that year, suggesting that Rene did little more than subsistence farming for himself and his family.

This concept of farming is typical of the French Canadians and it is the reason why French Canadians lost control over their holdings in Detroit two centuries later after the Great Fire of 1805. Anglo-Americans saw land as a means to make money by selling and building on it. By hook and by crook the Anglos rested the land away and drove the French Canadians into Monroe County and northern Macomb County.

The account books of Sainte-Anne-du-Petit-Cap's indicate that Rene was paid various small sums of money for handiwork around the Church. He apparently preferred odd jobs as a tradesman working with his hands rather than farm management. As a consequence, the records of the time note his many debts and arrearages in their payment.

Rene may have been more of a stone mason than a farmer. Records indicate that he took part in the construction of three churches at Ste. Anne: the chapel in 1658, the one of "mixed stone" in 1661, and the one of stone started in 1676.

Rene was confirmed by the eminent Msgr. de Laval on 2 February 1660 at the age of 27.

Rene's wife Anne died three months after their 8th child Joseph was born. She was buried on 27 February 1678 in Ste. Anne's Cemetery.

Eight years later, still unmarried, he contracts in 1686 with his daughter Anne and her husband, Pierre Allard (Allore), to live with them until his death. At that time the younger couple were living in Chateau-Richer, P.Q., Canada.

On Tuesday, 11 March 1696, nearly 20 years after his wife's death, "Rene de la Voye died suddenly in the road where he was beginning to walk to Holy Mass in the church of this parish", according to his burial act in Chatreau-Richer. Rene was approximately 63 years old at the time of his death which was probably the result of a massive heart attack.

The details of the above narrative and others in the life of Rene de la Voye, Jr., can be found in Thomas J. LaForest's Our French Canadian Ancestors, Vol XI, pp. 118-129, along with a list of other references reflecting on the life of this ancestor and his children.

Rene de la Voye, Jr., and his wife Anne Godin had eight children : Rene III, Jean, Anne, Pierre, Jacques, Madeleine, Bridget, and Joseph.

From these children spring the multifarious LaVoy/LaVoie Family of modern America and Canada.

It is their son Jacques who is the next ancestor of the LaVoy Family of Monroe Co., MI.

 
la Voye, Rene de Jr. (I00038)
 
5
The Descendants of Paul LaVoy and Elizabeth Reau

VIII. Paul LaVoy was the eighth known child of Fran‡ois LaVoy and Marie
Gouin, the founding parents of the LaVoy Family of Monroe County
Michigan. His brothers and sisters in order of birth were Charles, Mary,
an ungendered infant, Lambert, Francis, Jr., David, Fabian, and a
younger sister, Esther LaVoy. From Paul and his brothers spring num-
erous descendants bearing the name LaVoy in the Monroe, MI and Toledo,
OH, area.

A Family Bible, held by Evelyn Mae Stark, Paul's great-granddaughter,
gives Paul's birthdate as 28 February 1825. St Joseph's Baptism Records,
Erie, MI, indicate that a child of Fran‡ois LaVoy and Marie Gouin was
baptized 16 april 1825.(I, pg. 2). As the page is torn, the name and
birthdate are not available, but this entry is most likely Paul's.

(Paul's birthdate is also confirmed in the 1880 Road Atlas of Monroe
County in the Erie Township biography of Paul's son, Dennis LaVoy.)

Paul married Elizabeth Reau (Roe), perhaps in Monroe, at St. Antoine's,
where, she she was born 14 July 1824, the daughter of Joseph Reau and
Th‚rŠse GenviŠve Cousineau. The Monroe County Court House Records, as
compiled by the Monroe County Historical Society, do not contain a
record of this marriage, a not unusual event in the early days of the
Monroe County marriage records.

Paul LaVoy purchased forty acres from his parents for the princely sum
of $500, the averqge cost of farms in those days. The farm was located
in Erie, MI, and most likely a parcel of the original land purchased by\
his parents in the 1820's. The purchase took place on 22 November 1844
and Paul paid $500 in cash at the time. As a wife is not mentioned on
this date as co-purchaser, it is assumed Paul, age 19, was not married
at the time. The property purchased by Paul is described as follows: the
NW ¬ of the NW ¬ of Section 28, Township Eight South and Range Eight

East. (Monroe County Deeds, Liber, Folio 429).

Paul is also mentioned as an heir to his parents' estate in papers filed
by his oldest brother, Charles LaVoy, dated 20 September 1852 (Probate
File #1373). His father, Fran‡ois LaVoy, had died a week before on 13
September 1852 and his mother, Marie Gouin LaVoy, four days before her
husband on 9 September 1852, according to these papers.

By this date several of Paul's siblings are now deceased, the only
survivors being his older brothers, Charles, Francis, Jr., and Fabian
LaVoy.

Paul and his wife, Elizabeth, are found in Erie Township in the 1850
Federal Census for Monroe County, MI (p.310, dwelling #60) as follows:

Paul LaVoy, 25, farmer, born in Michigan, real estate valued at $300.
Elizabeth, age 26, born in Michigan, Danniel, age 2; David, age 2/12.

Also found in their entry, either as visitor on the day of Census, or
household help, is a ten year old boy named John Cousineau.



Paul's 1860 Census entry is also located in Erie Township (pg 212,
dwelling # 567) as follows:



Paul LaVoy, age 35, white male, farmer, born in Ohio. No value is
attached to his personal or real property in this Census. The change of
his birthplace from Michigan to Ohio no doubt stems from the change in
the state boundary line. At one time Toledo was part of Michigan. There
was a celebrated farmer's pitchfork war to resolve the matter. Michigan
was given the Upper Peninsula as a consolation prize for its loss of
Toledo to Ohio.

Also in this entry are Elizabeth, his wife, age 36, Dennis, age 12 (Ob-
viously the "Danniel" of the 1850 Census); David, age 10, Margaret, age
7, Elizabeth L. age 3, (all born in Michigan) and two unrelated individ-
uals, Joseph Belander, age 16, laborer, or farmhand, and Euselica Lav-
rence, age 15, born in Canada and listed as a "domestic".

In the 1870 Census, Paul LaVoy is again listed in Erie Township (pg.
264, dwelling #143) as follows:

Paul LaVoy, age 42, white male, farmer, born in Ohio, real estate valued
at $10,000 and personal property at $800. His wife Elizabeth is listed
as age 42 and keeping house. Dennis is now 21 and still living at home.
Margaret is age 17 and listed as living at home. Elizabeth F. age 13,
attending school, Ellen age 16, attending school, Adeline, age 7, at
home and David, age 4, at home.

There are some obvious problems with this entry: Ellen, now 16 was not
mentioned in the 1860 entry. David is listed as 4 in this entry while
another David is mentioned in the 1850 and 1860 entries who would be
much older than 4. It is possible that the older David died and another
child was named David.

The baptismal records of St. Joseph's, Erie, MI, indicate births and
baptisms for the following children which suggests Ellen's age may have
been misstated and that there was another younger David in the family:

(1) Margaret LaVoy, born and baptized 2 February 1853. (I,163)

(2) Dominic LaVoy, born 17 May 1855 and baptized 19 May 1855. This child
must have died before the age of 5 as he is not mentioned in the 1860
Census. (I, 189)

(3) Melandy LaVoy, born 19 June 1857, but no baptism date recorded in
the register (I, 206). This must be the Elizabeth L mentioned as age 3
in the 1860 Census and Elizabeth F, mentioned as age 13 in the 1870
Census. The probate file for her father Paul's estate (#1981) indicates
she died before 20 March 1877, but that she was alive at the time of her
father's death in 1871, age 17.

(4) Helena (Ellen) LaVoy, born 14 March 1860 and baptized 15 March 1860
This must be the Ellen of the 1870 Census with age 16 being a misreading
of age 10. (III, 22). The probate file (#1981) for her father's estate
indicates that she died 21 October 1873.

(5) Adelaide LaVoy, born 4 May 1863, but no date of baptism occurs in
the entry (III, 41). The probate file for her father's estate indicates
she was deceased before 20 March 1877, but was age 8 at the time of her
father's death.

(6) David LaVoy, born 2 November 1865 and baptized 4 November 1865 (III,
49-50). This is the David, age 4, of the 1870 Census.

I was unable to find a record of Dennis LaVoy's or the older David
LaVoy's baptism at St. Joseph's using the Rheaume indexes. Perhaps they
were baptized at another Church. Several early LaVoy baptisms in other
branches have not been found at St. Joseph's suggesting a nearby Church
in Ohio may have been used also.

The tender ages of many of the children and the cold weather suggest
that baptism occuring on the day of birth or a day or two later may have
occurred in the home rather than the Church.

Of the eight known children of Paul LaVoy and Elizabeth Reau, Dennis,
David I, Margaret, Dominic, Elizabeth, Ellen, Adelaide, and David II,
only three survived to 20 March 1877, according to the probate file
which was initiated by their mother, Elizabeth on 25 August 1871, about
two weeks after their father's death of consumption on 6 August 1871.

The 1880 Census for Erie Township records an entry for Elizabeth, age
50, with her son David, age 14, who is listed as having attended school
in the last year.

Elizabeth Reau (Roe) LaVoy, Paul's wife, died 19 September 1895,
according to the family Bible.

Pictures of the couple can be found in the 150th Anniversary Parish
History of St. Joseph's Catholic Church, Erie, p.43.

VIII-1 Dennis LaVoy, the first child of Paul LaVoy and Elizabeth Reau,
was born 1 October 1848 according to both the Family Bible, mentioned
earlier, and the 1880 Historical Road Atlas for Monroe County
Biographies for Erie, MI.

This latter reference states he was born in Erie and that he married on
1 October 1872, although the County Marriage Records indicate the date
as 30 September. He married Ellen Cousino, born 17 December 1841 in
Erie, the daughter of Isadore C. Cousino and Rosella Duval. Dennis'
occupation was that of a farmer. Dennis died 31 October 1894 according
to the family Bible.

Dennis LaVoy and Ellen Cousino's children, according to the 1880 Atlas
were: Rose A., Paul A., Auston E., and Adaline L. LaVoy. Dennis was also
the guardian of Dora Tabor.

The 1880 Census for Dennis LaVoy is found in Erie Township (pg. 370R,
dwelling #218):

Dennis LaVoy, farmer, age 31; Ellen, wife, keeping house; Paul, 4;


Austin, 3; Adaline, 1/12, born previous April; Dora Tabor, age 7,
servant.

Dennis died 31 October 1894, according to the family Bible.

The children of Dennis LaVoy and Ellen Cousino and their families are as
follows:

VIII-1-1: Rose A. LaVoy, born 1 November 1873 and died an infant 6 May
1874. (1880 Monroe County Road Atlas)

VIII-1-2: Paul A LaVoy, born 18 December 1875. (1880 Road Atlasa.
Obituary. MEN, 5-3-58). Paul married twice: (1) to Bernetta Morrin, the
daughter of David Morrin and Elizabeth Guire. She was 18 at the time of
her marriage to Paul A. and resided in Erie. Paul was 22. They were
married on 11 October 1898 at St. Joseph's, Erie, by Fr. Emil Wolfstyn.
Witnesses to the wedding were sister Ada Lavoy, and Jasper LaPointe.
(Monroe County Marriage Records, VI, 223, #512). Paul is noted to be a
farmer in the marriage record.

Paul married a second time to Anna J. Kessler on 21 January 1920 in\
Toledo, Ohio. Anna J. Kessler was born 20 February 1889 in Toledo, Ohio,
the daughter of John and Josephine Kessler. (Obituaries in MEN, October
1,2, and 4, 1968)

Paul was a life long farmer. He was a member of St. Joseph's Church,
Erie. He lived at 831 Substation Road, Erie, at the time of his death on
1 May 1958 at the age of 82 of a heart ailment (MEN obituary, 5-2 and
5-3-1958). He is buried in St. Joseph's Cemetery, Erie.

He was survived by his wife, Anna, sons Raymond of Toledo, OH, Paul, Jr.
and Jesse of Temperance, MI, and daughters, Mrs. Marie Schaefer of
Toledo and Mrs Agnes Grochowski, Erie, MI; and his sister, Addie Cogan
of Toledo.

Anna J. Kessler LaVoy was a member of St. Joseph's parish, Erie, and St.
Anne's altar society. At the time of her death she lived at 831
Substation Road, Erie. She had lived in the area for 48 years. She died
of a heart ailment at age 79 on 1 October 1968 and was buried in St.
Joseph's cemetery.

She was survived by 2 sons, Jesse LaVoy of Tehcumseh and Paul N. LaVoy
of Temperance, a stepson, Raymond Etzel of Toledo, a daughter, Mrs
Robert (Rita) Zink of Temperance, a step-daughter, Mrs. L.J. (Marie)
Schaefer of Temperance. Her husband and a daughter preceded her in
death. (MEN obituaries, 10-1, 10-2, 1nd 10-4-1968).

Besides the above children, another son, Lester LaVoy, age 16 died in a
car accident on 23 August 1937. The details of this accident are
narrated in a front page story in the Monroe Evening News (MEN), dated
23 August 1937. He was survived by the following: two brothers, Paul and
Jesse LaVoy, a step-brother, Raymond Etzel of Toledo, a step sister, Mrs
Louis Schaefer of Toeldo, and two sisters, Rita Marie and Agnes LaVoy.
Burial was at St.Joseph's Cemetery.


VIII-1-3: Austin Edward LaVoy, the third child of Dennis LaVoy and Ellen
Cousino, was born 29 August 1877. (1880 Monroe Road Atlas) He died 7
July 1906, age 29, at 9 o'clock in the morning of "dropsey of the
heart" He had "suffered silently for six weeks" attended to by his
mother. He was not married at the time of his death. (Obituaries,
Monroe Record Commercial, 19 July 1906, pg 3, c.l; The Monroe Democrat,
13 July 1906, pg 5, c.5)

VIII-1-4: Adaline L. LaVoy, the fourth child of Dennis LaVoy and Ellen
Cousino, was born 28 May 1880. (1880 Monroe County Road Atlas, father's
biography) Married , age 30, to Frank Cogan, age 27, born in Jackson,
OH, the son of Joseph Cogan and Nancy Green. Frank Cogan was a merchant
at the time of his marriage which took place in Monroe on 27 June 1911
with Fr. C. O'Meara officiating. (Monroe County Marriage Records, VIII,
17, #242)

VIII-3: Margaret LaVoy was the third child of Paul LaVoy and Elizabeth
Reau. Her baptismal record at St. Joseph's, Erie, indicates she was born
and baptized on 2 February 1853 (I, 163). At the age of 22, on 25
January 1875, St. Joseph's Church, Erie, she married Samuel LaPointe,
age 26, a farmer. Margaret was one of the three children to survive into
adulthood of a sibship of eight.

VIII-8: David Paul LaVoy was the eighth child of Paul LaVoy and
Elizabeth Reau and one of three to survive into adulthood of a sibship\
of eight. He was born 2 November 1865 and baptized 4 November 1865,
according to St. Joseph's records, Erie. (III, 49-50).

He married at the age of 25 on 4 February 1891 to Exaline Dusseau, age
16, the daughter of Eli Dusseau and Orillia Shinevare (Confirmed by
family Bible) (The family Bible indicates that Eli Dusseau was born 11
February 1840 and died 22 December 1929 and that Orillia Shinavere
Dusseau was born 18 September 1852 and died 12 December 1912.) (Monroe
County Marriage Records, VI, 66, #986) Gabirel Dusseau and Anna LaVoy
were witnesses. The records indicate he was a farmer.

Exaline Dusseau LaVoy was born 27 July 1874 (Family Bible).

David Paul LaVoy and Exaline Dusseau had eight children, four of whom
survived their father's death: Harry LaVoy, age 12; Edna Cecelia LaVoy,
age 10; Ethel LaVoy, age 5, and Alton LaVoy, 11 months.

David Paul LaVoy died on 26 March 1905 from tuberculosis from which he
had suffered for 10 years. Besides his wife and four children he was
survived by a sister, Mrs S. W. LaPointe of Monroe. (Death Certificate,
Monroe County, Liber B, pg 215; Obituaries, The Record Commercial, 6
April 1905, p.2, c.2; Monroe Democrat, 7 April 1905, p. 7, c. 4)

Exeline Dusseau LaVoy, the widow of David Paul LaVoy remarried to Dennis
Duval 30 November 1916. Dennis Duval was born 5 March 1863. (Family
Bible) Four years later in April, 1922, the couple moved into their new
house according to a note in the Family Bible. Exaline Dusseau LaVoy
Duval died 20 July 1966. Dennis Duval died 11 October 1932. (Bible
Records.)

The eight children of David Paul LaVoy and Exeline Dusseau were as
follows (according to the family Bible): Edgar, Harry, Edna, Beattrice,
Ethel, Eddie, Floyd, and Elton LaVoy.

VIII-8-1: Edgar Lucious Lavoy, born 14 September 1891, died 23 May 1893.

VIII-8-2: Harry A. LaVoy was born 5 October 1892, Erie, MI. He lived in

Deerfield for the last 27 years of his life and was a member of St.
Alphonsus Church in that city. He married May R. Duval. The date of the
marriage is uncertain as three dates have been found. The Family Bible
states it wa 9 January 1916. Harry's obituary states it was 9 June 1917
and Mae's obituary states it was 8 January 1917.

Harry A. LaVoy died 8 March 1944 in Deerfield (Obituary) or 9 March 1944
(Bible) and was buried in St. Alphonsus Cemetery. He was survived by his
mother (Exeline Dusseau LaVoy Duval), his wife, two daughters, Mrs=
Lillian Diver and Mrs Harriet Walker of Deerfield, and three sons,
Donald, Merlyn and Harry LaVoy, Jr., as well as two sisters, Mrs Edward
Roe of Detroit and Mrs Joseph Stark of Erie, and a brother Alton LaVoy
of Erie. Two sons preceded Harry A. LaVoy in death. (Obit, MEN, 3-9-44)

Mae R. Duval LaVoy lived at 1240 Bragg Road, Deerfield, at the time of
her death at age 85 on 21 September 1975. She was born 25 April 1890 in
Albuquerque, NM, the daughter of Daniel and Pauline Duval. She was a
lifetime resident of the Deerfield area, a member of St. Alphonus
Church, Deerfield, its Altar Society, a member of the American Legion
Post 392 Auxillary, and the Deerfield Senior Citizens. Burial was in St.
Alphonsus' Cemetery. She was survived by three sons, Donald and Harry of
Deerfield, and Merlyn of Toledo, OH. and two daughters, Mrs Beaumont
(Lillian) Diver and Mrs Irving (Harriet) Welkler, both of Deerfield. She
was preceded in death by two sons. (Obit, MEN, 22 September 1975)

Harry A. LaVoy and Mae R. Duval's son, Donald D. LaVoy, was born 25
October 1920 in Summerfield Township, MI. He married Martha Watson on 4
November 1944 in Deerfield. He was a self-employed farmer in Petersburg,
a member of St. Alphonus Parish in Deerfield, and a member of the
Deerfield and Petersburg Fire Departments.

He died at the age of 71 years on 24 April 1992 and was interred in St.
Alphonsus Cemetery. He was preceded in death by his brother Henry (Harry)
and sister Lillian Lavoy (Mrs Beaumont Diver).

He was survived by his two sons, Dennis LaVoy of Petersburg and Harold
LaVoy of Toledo, OH; a daughter Rita LaVoy of Deerfield, a sister,
Harriet Welker of Deerfield, and a brother, Merlyn LaVoy of Toledo.
(Obit, MEN, 4-25-92)

Harry A. LaVoy and May R. Duval's son, Harry LaVoy was born 5 June 1924
in Deerfield, MI. He married Mavel Dawson 27 June 1953. He had farmed in
the Deerfield area most of his life. During World War II he was a
Marine. He held membership in the Deerfield American Legion Post, the
Summerfield Veterans of Foreign Wars, Post 6509, and the Adrian Knights
of Columbus. At the time of his death he resided at 1240 Bragg Road,
Monroe County. He died on 17 April 1986 at the age of 61 years.

He was preceded in death by an infant son, his parents, and his sister
Lillian LaVoy Diver.
He was survived by his wife, two sons, Augustus LaVoy of Toledo and
Gregory LaVoy who was still at home at the time of his father's death,
his daughter Renee LaVoy, at home, and his brothers, Donald LaVoy of
Deerfield and Merlyn LaVoy of Toledo, and a sister, Mrs Harriet Welker
of Deerfield.

He was buried in St. Alphonsus Cemetery, Deerfield. (Obits, MEN, 4-18,
4-19-86)

A daughter of Merlyn LaVoy, Jackquelyn Marie LaVoy, was born on or about
18 December 1949, and died at the age of 11 days (Obit, Toledo [OH]
Blade, 12-30-1949).

VIII-8-3: Edna Cecelia LaVoy was the third child of David Paul LaVoy and
Exeline Dusseau. She was born 5 September 1894 in Erie. (Family Bible)
At age 19. she married Jeseph E. Stark, age 21, a cost accountant who
resided in Lasalle, MI. He was the son of Frank Stark and Sarah Baron.

Edna LaVoy married Joseph E. Stark on 18 November 1913 at St.Joseph's,
Erie. Harry LaVoy and Norma Stark were witnesses. (Monroe County
Marriage Records, VIII, 144, #621)

Edna Cecelia LaVoy Stark Jacobs died 26 December 1982. Joseph Stark died
30 January 1946. (Family Bible)

The descendants of Edna Cecelia LaVoy and Joseph E. Stark are noted in
Loretta Cousino's 1958 Book, Cousineau Sur La Baie, and are as follows:

Their children were: Audrey, Aaron, Merril, Jeanette, Evelyn, Joseph,
Duward, Dolores and Calvin Stark.

VIII-8-3-1: Audrey Stark married Wilson Diver. Their children are:
Janice, Robert, Judith, Kaye Jean, Dean, Terrance, and Dale Diver

VIII-8-3-2: Aaron Stark

VIII-8-3-3: Merril Stark married Lucelia Roe Anderson. Their child is
Kieth Stark.

VIII-8-3-4: Jeanette Stark married Oneal Petee. Their children are Gary,
Pamela, Gayle Ann, and Douglas Petee.

VIII-8-3-5: Evelyn Mae Stark was born 27 January 1923 in Toledo, OH. She
married Carl Anthony DuVall on 30 November 1946 at St. Joseph's Church,
Erie. He was born 16 April 1921 in Erie, the son of Dominic Francis
DuVall and Ida Amelia Wammes. Their children are:

VIII-8-3-5-1: Anita DuVall

VIII-8-3-5-2: Lonnie DuVall

VIII-8-3-5-?: Wendy Sue DuVall, born 10 January 1956, Toledo, OH. She
married Mark Daniel Angelocci (born 23 July 1954, Royal Oak, MI) on 12
September 1980 in Ypsilanti, MI.

Information for this branch of the LaVoy family was supplied in large
part by the efforts of Wendy Sue DuVall-Angelocci, an amateur
genealogist like the current writer who is working on her Monroe County
family connections. She currently lives in Novi, MI.

VIII-8-3-6: Joseph Stark, Jr. Died as an infant.

VIII-8-3-7: Duward Stark married Waneta Steinman. Their children are
Dennis Lee and Vicki Lynn Stark.

VIII-8-3-8: Dolores Stark married Harry Steinman. Their chidren are
Leigh, Lynn, and Ralph Steinman.

VIII-8-3-9: Calvin Stark (deceased)

VIII-8-4: The fourth child of David Paul LaVoy and Exeline Dusseau was
Beattrice Ignatious LaVoy, born 1 July 1897 and died 15 August 1898.

VIII-8-5: The fifth child of David Paul LaVoy and Exeline Dusseau was
Ethel LaVoy, born 11 July 1899, married Edward Roe 18 November 1920.
Ethel LaVoy Roe died 27 November 1989. (Family Bible)

VIII-8-6: The sixth child of David Paul LaVoy and Exeline Dusseau was
Eddie Eugene LaVoy, born 8 April 1901 and died 31 March 1902.

VIII-8-7: The seventh child of David Paul LaVoy and Exeline Dusseau was
Floyd Duby LaVoy who was born 31 December 1902 and died 18 February
1903.

VIII-8-8: The eighth child of David Paul LaVoy and Exeline Dusseau was
Alton A. LaVoy, born 10 April 1904 in Erie, he married Agnes L. Miring 6
June 1928. (Family Bible) He was employed for 25 years as a plater by
Dura Corp., retiring in 1966. He had farmed also. At the time of his
death he lived on N. Erie St., in Toledo, Ohio. He died at the age of 86
on 9 September 1990. Burial was in St. Joseph's Cemetery, Erie, MI.

He was preceded in death by his wife Agnes. He was survived by two sons,
David LaVoy of Temperance, MI, and Alton LaVoy, Jr., of Erie, MI, and
two daughters, Mrs Dorothy Cousino and Mrs Alvaretta Fay, both of
Temperance. (Obit, 9-11-90, MEN)

Agnes L. LaVoy died at the age of 82 on 14 May 1986 in Toledo, Ohio She
had once owned a farm in Erie and was buried in St. Joseph's Cemetery,
Erie. (Obit, MEN, 5-15-86)

Compiled 19 February 1994

Patrick L. Tombeau
11035 Ingram
Livonia, MI 48150
ph. (313) 421-7323

 
LaVoy, Paul (I00048)
 
6
Catherine Tombow and Robert Wilson

Work on this branch of the Tombow Family may also be found in Dorothy Tombow Boulware's Book "Tambos, Tombo, Tombow from 1780's"which may be found in the Lancaster Mennonite Historical Society's Library and the Lancaster County (PA) Genealogical Library.
Mrs Boulware lives in Argyle, TX as of 2005.

It has been pointed out previously that the founding parents of the Family, William Tombos and Mary Ann Herzkey, had six children. (Miscellaneous Documents, Lancaster Co. Orphans Court, September, l858, pp. l78-9).

These children in order of birth were John Tombow, William Tombow, Jr., Mary Ann Tombow, Sarah Tombow, Lydia Tombow, and Catherine Tombow.

This chapter of the Family History discusses Catherine Tombow, the sixth and last child of William Tombos and Mary Ann Herzkey.

Catherine Tombow was born 23 June l825 according to Cemetery Records at the Mellinger Mennonite Cemetery in E. Lancaster where she is buried. She was raised in her parents home in E. Lampeter, on the Old Philadelphia Turnpike. A description of this property is found in the chapter on the Origins of the Family.

According to the above cited Orphans Court Records, she married Robert Wilson. Robert Wilson was born December 4, l8l8, as calculated from his obituary age. Robert's parentage is unknown. However, William Tombos purchased land from his next door neighbor, James Wilson on 1 April l84l (Deeds, S-6-74). This lead needs to be explored perhaps by seeking the Will of James Wilson to determine if Robert Wilson is his son.

No marriage date has been found as of this writing. But, as the early Family was Mennonite, they would have been married in a Church with ordained Clergy, perhaps the German Reformed Church or Trinity Lutheran Church in the City of Lancaster.

They were, however, married by l850 as they appear together in her father's Federal Census entry in E. Lampeter as follows (Census taken 28 August l850, dwelling #ll6):

Dombo, William, 6l years, farmer, real estate valued at $2,500 Dombo, Elizabeth, 54 years, born in Pennsylvania Dombo, Samuel , age l4 (?), born in Pennsylvania, attends school Dombo, Mary, 8 years, born in Pennsylvania, attends school Wilson, Robert, 32 years, laborer, born in Pennsylvania Wilson, Catherine, 25 years, born in Pennsylvania

This entry, with a misspelling of the Family name by a German Census taker indicates that she was living with her father, step-mother, Elizabeth and a niece and nephew, children of her older brother, William, Jr. It may also suggest that they were newly weds since they have not yet set up separate housekeeping.

The l860 Federal Census for W. Lampeter Township, in Lancaster County, Pennsylvania, p. 808, dwelling #l33, has the following entry:

Robert Wilson, age 4l, farmer, born in PA, estate valued at $600.
Catherine Wilson, age 35, born in PA
Benjamin T. Groff, age l3, born in PA
Sidney Groff (female), age l5, born in PA
Isaac Gann (?), age l9, farmer, born in PA

Benjamin and Sidney Groff are Catherine's nephew and niece by her older sister Lydia Tombow Groff. Isaac is a hired farmhand.

No further Census work has been done for Catherine Tombow Wilson and her husband Robert. No Deed work has been done at this writing.

Robert Wilson died 4 January l893 in East Lampeter Township at the age of 74 years and one month, He is buried in Row 5, Mellinger's Mennonite Cemetery on Lincoln Highway in E. Lancaster, Pennsylvania, with his wife and other members of the Tombow Family.

The following obituary appeared in The Daily New Era, Friday, 6 January 1893:

"WILSON, January 4th, l893 in East Lampeter township, Robert Wilson, aged seventy-four years and one month.

The relatives and friends of the family are respectfully invited to attend the funeral, from his late residence, on Saturday morning at 9 o'clock, and at Mellinger's Meeting House at 9:30 o'clock. Interment at Mellinger's."

Catherine Tombow Wilson died on 8 May l9ll. The following obituary appeared in the Lancaster New Era, 9 May l9ll:

"Death of Mrs. Catherine Wilson

Mrs. Catherine Wilson, widow of Robert Wilson, of No. 224 E. Frederick street, died on Monday from general debility in her 86th year. Mr Wilson died l8 years ago, and no children survive. Deceased was a daughter of William and Mary Tombow, of near Witmer, where she was born. She made her home with a niece, Mrs, J. R. Givler. The deceased was a member of the Mennonite Church. The funeral will take place from Mrs. Givler's home at one o'clock on Thursday afternoon, and at two o'clock at Mellinger's Church along the Philadelphia turnpike."

On the next day, l0 May l9ll, the following obituary appeared in the Lancaster New Era, p. 5:

"WILSON In Lancaster, Catherine Wilson, widow of Robert Wilson, aged eighty-six years.

The relatives and friends of the family are respectfully invited to attend the funeral from the residence of the niece, Mrs J.R. Givler, No. 224 East Frederick street, on Thursday afternoon at one o'clock at the house and at two o'clock at Mellinger's Church"

Catherine Tombow's death certificate indicates that she died age 85 years, l0 months, and l5 days, of cerebral apoplexy (stroke). She had been paralyzed at the time of her death.

Her tombstone still stands commemorating her grave in Mellinger's Cemetery. With the passing of Catherine Tombow Wilson, the last of the old Tombow Family was gone. Between her father's birth in Holland in l787 to her death in l9ll in the city of Lancaster, Pennsylvania, three centuries are spanned in the space of those l24 years.

This line is believed extinct. On the basis of Census work and the obituaries of Robert and Catherine Wilson which mention no children or descendants, it is concluded that no children were born of this union or, if born, none survived to maturity.

No Will has been found in the Lancaster Court House for Robert or Catherine Wilson.
 
Tombow, Catherine (I07260)
 
7
The Descendants of Samuel R. Tombo and Frances Alwilda Lake

II-1 Samuel R. Tombo was the first of the nine children of William Tombow, Jr. and Elizabeth Rohrer of Lancaster County, Pennsylvania. He was also the oldest grandson of his paternal grandparents, William Tombos and Mary Herzkey, the first of the Tombow Family in America. Samuel appears to be named after his maternal grandfather, Samuel Rohrer, as was the custom of the time. His mother was of fourth generation Alsatian stock. His father's father was a Dutch immigrant. Unlike the other members of his family, Samuel signs his name with out the final "w".

The evidence that Samuel R. Tombo is the son of William Tombow, Jr. is found in three separate records: in the l852-55 Lancaster County Register of Births, Deaths, and Marriages, on the occasion of his youngest brother William's birth in l852. The second mention is found in the l865 proceedings in the Whiteside (IL) County Circuit Court as an heir to his father's estate (Letters of Administration). The third mention occurs in papers filed by David F. Kauffman in Whiteside County Circuit Court on 2 March l904 against the heirs of William Tombow, Jr., to obtain clear title to William's property who had died 39 years before without a will. (General No. l727, Whiteside County Circuit Court). The details of this case may be found in the section of this history narrating the events in the life of William Tombow, Jr.

Samuel R. Tombo is the great-grandfather of this writer and the ancestor of those family members who spell their name in a French manner, as either Tambeau or Tombeau, a practice started by this writer's father, Leo Thomas Tambeau, despite the Dutch origins of the name.

Most of what we know about Samuel R. Tombo comes from the public record. Very little oral tradition has come down in this family about him and our ancestry, unlike other branches. This appears to be due to the fact that Samuel died at the early age of 28-29 years, five years married, and when his only son and child, William, was but two years old. His widow subsequently remarried and moved away from Carbondale, which is in Lackawanna County, Pennsylvania, to Carbon County, with her new husband, Nicolas Johns. All of Samuel's brothers and sisters had moved with his father to Whiteside County, Illinois, a thousand miles away. All of Samuel's aunts, uncles and cousins lived in Lancaster County.

The oral tradition passed down to this writer by his Aunt Pearl Tambeau was that the Tambeau Family had "relatives in Lancaster". The writer's Aunt Peg Tambeau, upon reading a reference to Smoketown, Pennsylvania, as the site of the Tombow Family homestead, stated that every summer her father, William Tambo, would visit there for a week. When she was asked if she ever head that her grandfather, Samuel, had been in the Civil War, she replied that she remembered being told this as a child. My Aunt Pearl also remembered towns near Carbon County, such as Hazleton and McAdoo where her father, as a child, must have lived as his step-father, Nicolas Johns, pursued coal mining as an engineer, an occupation that his step-son, William Tambo, would take up years later in Olyphant.

Such, then, was the meager oral history of the origins of our family passed down to this writer. The writer's father, Leo Tambeau, when asked questions about the family, always jokingly responded that there were probably horse thieves in the family and it was best to leave well enough alone. Whether this remark was just a joke, or reflects another dimly remembered rumor in the family history is not known. But, as it so happens, my father's great uncle Jacob Tombow, out in Whiteside County, Illinois, was indeed a horse thief!

Samuel R. Tombo was most likely born in l839 in Lancaster County, PA, from ages found in the Federal Censuses and his Civil War papers. He died in Philadelphia, PA, on 7 July l868 while undergoing surgery for the amputation of his leg.

For a good part of his young adulthood, Samuel suffered hip and leg problems. It is not clear whether they were congenital or the result of injuries suffered in the Civil War, as is claimed in his pension papers. His burial place is unknown at this writing, although at the time of the birth of his son, William Tambo, in l866, he was living in Carbondale, near Scranton, Pennsylvania.

Samuel married Frances Alwilda Lake on l3 December l863 in Dandoff, Susquehanna County (just north of Scranton), Pennsylvania, according to the widow's pension papers found in the National Archives in Washington, D.C. Frances Alwilda Lake was the daughter of William and Catherine Lake. What is known about her family and origins will follow later.

Samuel R. Tombo is found in three Federal Censuses. He apparently has a double entry for the l840 Federal Census of Lancaster County as he appears to be registered, perhaps on different dates, as living with his paternal grandparents and with his parents.

The following entry is found on p. 386, dwelling #4, of the Federal Census for Lampeter Township, Lancaster County, Pennsylvania:

Tambo, William, Senior:

Male l (0-5 years
Male l (50-60 years)
Female l (l0-l5 years)
Female l (l5-20 years)
Female l (20-30 years)
Female l (40-50 years)

The second entry for Samuel for the l840 Census is recorded in Lampeter Township, p. 382, as follows:

William Tombow, Jr.

l male (0-5 years)
l male (20-30 years)
l female (20-30 years)

In l840, Lampeter Township had a population of 3,284 people, (l840 Federal Census, Lancaster County, PA, p. 39l)

In the l850 Census, Samuel Tombo again has a double entry as the result of being in different places on the days the Census was being taken.

He is recorded in his grandfather's entry in E. Lampeter Township, Lancaster County, p. 202, dwelling #ll6, under the name of "Dombo", a Germanic corruption of "Tombo". This entry was taken on 28 August l850.

Dombo, William, 6l years, farmer, real estate valued at $2,500.
Dombo, Elizabeth, 54 years, born in Pennsylvania
Dombo, Samuel, l4 (?) years, born in Pennsylvania, attends school
Dombo, Mary, 8 years, born in Pennsylvania, attends school
Wilson, Robert, 32 years, laborer, born in Pennsylvania
Wilson, Catherine, 25 years, born in Pennsylvania

Samuel is also found for a second time on another date, l0 September l850, living with the family of John Weaver, in E. Lampeter, dwelling #34l (p. 2l7, l850 Federal Census, Lancaster Co., PA):

John Weaver, 3l years, farmer
Mary Weaver, 7l years
Anna Weaver, 33 years
Maria Weaver, 28 years
Jacob Weaver, 30 years
Jacob Milk (?), age l6 years
Samuel Tombo, age l0 years, attended school in the last year

(In this entry Samuel's age is unambiguously l0 years old. In the previous entry, the writing is illegible, but looks like "l4", as the best guess. In this year Samuel would have been l0 going on 11 years.

In the l850 Census, E. Lampeter township, newly formed from Lampeter Township, had a population of l,980 people. There were 34l dwellings housing 360 families. (1850 Federal Census, Lancaster Co. PA, p. 2l7)

In the l860 Federal Census for Lancaster County, Samuel Tombo, is found living in W. Lampeter Township, dwelling #ll6, p. 805, with the Jacob Delp Family, as a farm hand, age 2l:

Jacob Delp, age 42, farmer
Harriet Delp, age 40
Lusetta Delp, age l7
Rachel Delp, age l4
Meno Delp, age 7,
Suzanna Delp, age 5
Catherine Landis, age 50
H Jacob Lamais, age l4
Samuel Tombo, age 2l, farmhand

Samuel does not appear in later Censuses as he died in l868.

On l2 April l86l, at 4:30 in the morning, the Confederate Commander, General Pierre Gustave Toutant Beauregard, ordered his men to fire on Ft. Sumter. Thus began the American Civil War, which lasted four years and which was to reek havoc not only in the United States but upon the microcosm of the Tombow Family.

Seventeen days after Ft. Sumter, on 29 April l86l, Samuel R. Tombow enlisted as a private in Co. E of the l0th Regiment of the Pennsylvania Volunteers for a three month stint. This would be the first of his four enlistments. A few years after the Civil War he would die of ailments aggravated by his soldier days, leaving only one son to carry on the name.

In Illinois, his brothers, Jacob and John, also enlisted while still in their early teens. John Tombow would die before the War ended of diseases contracted while in the army. Jacob Tombow would survive the war, but turn to a life of crime, serve time for stealing a horse, change his name to Jacob Miller, and though married twice, die childless.

Samuel's cousins, Nathaniel Tombow, William Tombow, and John Tombow, Jr., sons of his Uncle John Tombow, would enlist in the Ohio Volunteers. Nathaniel would suffer a war injury but survive and marry to have sons. William was killed in action and was buried in Tennessee. John Tombow, Jr., also survived the War, but remained a childless bachelor. Another cousin, Calvin J. Groff, a son of Samuel's Aunt Lydia Tombow Groff, also entered the War and survived to raise a family. William J. Bowers, a son of Samuel's Aunt Sarah Tombow Bowers Weaver, also entered the war and survived to marry. And two cousins from the Smith side of the family, sons of his Aunt Mary Ann Tombow Smith, Henry and William Smith, also enlisted and survived the War.

Ten men of the Tombow Family, six bearing the name of Tombow, served in the Civil War. Only two of the six men bearing the Tombow name, however, perpetuated the name. Thus in the third generation in this country the Tombow name nearly ceased to exist.

References to Samuel Tombo's enlistment in the 10th Regiment of Pennsylvania Volunteers are found in Ellis and Evans' History of Lancaster County, Pennsylvania, pp 90-9l, the name distorted by the transcriber to Samuel Tumlow. References to this enlistment are also found in the Lacaster County Daily Express newspaper 3 May l86l (as published in the Lancaster County Heritage Magazine, Vol. 2, No. 3, 3 July l985, pp. l22-23).

This regiment, organized 29 April l86l, went to Camp Slifer, near Chamberlain, Pennsylvania, on l May. On 8 June it marched for Greencastle, PA, and joined Gen. Patterson's Army. On 2 July it crossed the Patomac and on 3 July reached Martinsburg, PA. It participated in demonstrations before the Confederate Army at Manassas, VA, and was then ordered to Charleston, S.C. On 23 July it went to Harper's Ferry, WV, and on 24 July to a point opposite Antietam Creek, MD, whence it marched to Hagerstown, MD, and then by rail to Harrisburg, PA., where on 3l July the men were mustered out of service. Samuel's military records indicate he was owed $2.00 for his enlistment when he mustered out.

Nineteen days later, on l9 August l86l, Pvt. Samuel R Tomboor (according to regimental records which again distorted the name) enlisted in the 79th Regiment, Co. A., for three years. He was discharged on a physician's certificate as physically unfit for further service on l9 December l862.

The Lancaster County Daily Express newspaper carries notice of this enlistment on 11 September l86l (as published in the Lancaster County Heritage Magazine, Vol. 2, No. 3, 3 July l985, pp. l22-23). His name is distorted to Samuel P. Tembo. Ellis and Evans' History of Lancaster County, Pennsylvania, pp. lll-l27, gives a history of this regiment and the names of its men and officers.

At his second enlistment, Samuel was described as 2l years of age, five feet, seven inches tall, having a dark complexion, dark eyes, and dark hair, and by occupation a laborer.

His military papers indicate that he was at Camp Andy Johnson, Nashville, Tennessee, at the time of discharge and that the reason for discharge was the result of "chronic synovitis and atrophy of the muscles of the hip, which patient says existed before enlistment." He had been adjudged as unfit for duty for 60 days prior to his discharge.

It was based on this admission of a medical condition existing prior to enlistment that he and his widow would be denied a pension in the years following the War.

During his second enlistment in the 79th regiment, Samuel was detailed as a Brigade Teamster (horse driver) on 20 November l86l.

He listed his mailing address upon discharge as Strassburg, Lancaster County, PA.

Undaunted, several months after his discharge in December of l862, Samuel enlisted for the third time on 6 July l863 at Lancaster for six months duty in the 2lst Pennsylvania Cavalry, also known as the 182nd Regiment. This time the name came out as Samuel R. Trumbo. He had now advanced to the rank of corporal with this enlistment. His occupation is listed as that of farrier, or blacksmith. On the Company Muster Roll of 3l August l863 he was noted to be a Quartermaster Sergeant. On 8 November l863 he was reduced to the ranks for unspecified reasons. On l2 November l863 he was appointed horse farrier.

On l8 January l864 he mustered out of Co. C, to join Co. I for a three year tour of duty. This was at Camp Cooke, near Scranton. Co. C of the l82nd had apparently been stationed near Scranton since about August of l863. It will be recalled that Samuel married Frances Alwilda Lake l3 December l863. Clearly a whirlwind romance must have occurred between the two, perhaps after meeting each other at a Soldiers' Ball. The Scranton papers of this period might provide further information about this period in the lives of our ancestors.

Ellis and Evans' History of Lancaster County, pp. l60-62, details the history and men of the l82nd regiment. In this history, Samuel's name is recorded as Samuel R. Tambo.

At his fourth enlistment, at Scranton, in Co. I of the l82nd Regiment, Samuel is given a bounty of $60.00 and a twenty day furlough, perhaps for a honeymoon with his newly wed wife. His enlistment papers also contain his signature as "Samuel R. Tombo".

On 2l February l864 he is again restored to the rank of Quartermaster Sergeant. On the Company Muster Roll, dated 30 June l864, it is noted that Samuel has been sick in the hospital in Washington, D.C., since 23 May l864. On 9 July l864 he is given a disability discharge with the rank of quartermaster sergeant. He was discharged at Camp Stonemen, Washington, D.C., with a total disability due to chronic arthritis of the knee with which he suffered at the time of enlistment. He was deemed not entitled to a pension by the Chief of the Cavalry Division Department, Washington, D.C., according to Samuel's military papers.

Upon discharge, Samuel's mailing address was noted to be Carbondale, Pennsylvania.

On 2l June l865, Samuel appeared before a Court clerk in the city of Carbondale, Pennsylvania, to state his identity as the same Samuel R. Tombo, quartermaster sergeant, who enlisted l8 January l864 at Scranton in Co. I of the 2lst Regiment of Pennsylvania Cavalry Volunteers, commanded by Capt. McMillen, and discharged 9 July l864.

He further stated that while he was in the service, he received in the line of duty "a severe wound upon his knee enlarging the knee joint and has resulted in reducing his leg and thigh to about one half its natural size, compelling him to use two crutches or canes constantly for walking when he walks at all, that it was caused by the fall of his horse upon him while on duty at Chambersburg, Pennsylvania, about the l5th of February A.D. l864, that his occupation is a common laborer, that his residence is Carbondale, State of Pennsylvania."

These statements were made as part of his application for a pension. His signature on this document appears as "Samuel R. Tombo". He brought as his witnesses, Henry C. Spencer and G. R. Crocker. In addition he brought an affidavit from Drs. R. Ottman and Charles Burr, surgeons, city of Carbondale, stating that Samuel had "an injury upon the knee joint resulting in an enlargement and partial anchylosis and that he was wholly disabled from obtaining subsistence by manual labor." The surgeon's affidavit goes on to state that the injury occurred on or about l5 February l864 at Chambersburg.

It is not clear what action was taken on Samuel's pension from papers in the National Archives. There is no evidence that he was granted the pension and years later his widow's request for his pension was turned down on the grounds that Samuel had a disability by his own admission before entering the service.

On l2 April l866 his one and only child, William, was born, according to the pension application filed by William's mother.

A little over two years later, as noted previously, on 7 July l868 Samuel dies during an operation to amputate his leg in Philadelphia Hospital. It is not known why he was in this hospital for this operation. Perhaps because of the seriousness of the operation, he went to a specialist in a larger city than nearby Scranton.

The life of our ancestor Samuel R. Tombo is a testimonial to one of the tragic aspects of the Civil War. Many died inglorious deaths, not from gun shot wounds, but diseases and injuries sustained during the War effort. Recruiting practices were "shady" at best in what was to be a short war in which Yankees were to beat the Rebel upstarts in three months. Samuel's first tour of duty was for only three months as were most tour of duties early in l86l, reflecting the North's ill-fated optimism about the strength of the Southern forces.

But as time wore on, it was clear that the rural South was every bit a match for the industrial North, mainly because of the ineptitude of the northern generals and the bravery and tactics of the southern generals.

And, as the conflict dragged on, months turning into years, and the horrors of war mounted in the daily press and the letters back home, the North could not rely on new fresh faces of recruits from the younger brothers of families, emulating their heroic older brothers.

The bounties began to mount in size. While Samuel was paid only a $60 bounty in his February, l864, enlistment, his younger brother, Jacob Tombow, out in Illinois, in July of l864 was given a handsome bounty of $480.

But other practices of recruiting were less savory. A philosophy of getting a recruit at all costs before forced conscription was ordered by President Lincoln became more and more corrupt. Orders were issued that doctors were to verify recruits were sober, free of disease, and of a proper age at enlistment. Such orders did little good as the case of Samuel Tombow and his younger brother Jacob Tombow proves. Jacob at his enlistment in l864 was only l5 years old. When he mustered out at the end of the War, he was only l6. His older brother, John Tombow, had enlisted long before he died at the age of l7 of illnesses contacted while in service.

Samuel himself, through four enlistments was clearly suffering from a congenital disability involving his legs and hip joints. He should not have been allowed with these disabilities considering the life of a soldier which involved forced marches day and night, as the regimental histories adequately detail, and the endless parade drills in Camp when not marching, as the letters back home again and again complain of.

Samuel might have survived into an honorable old age, like many of his siblings, if his own patriotism and ambitions, as the oldest child and son, to become an officer in the Army, had not dulled his recognition of one inescapable fact: that there would be a lot of marching before a comfortable job in the officers' quarters was his and that the endless marches would aggravate a chronic physical disability that led to his untimely death three years after discharge in a Philadelphia Hospital, his leg having become fatally gangrenous.

And had the army followed its instructions not to recruit those with serious disabilities, his third and fourth enlistments could not have occurred after his discharge on a physician's certificate in December of l862.

Samuel was ambitious and, being in his early twenties, felt immortal, as we all do at that age. The army had its needs. The combination was tragic.

Samuel R. Tombo and Frances Alwilda Lake had one child: William Tambo 
Tombo, Samuel R. (I03718)
 
8 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Walczak, Brandi (I08542)
 
9
Claude-Jean-Thomas Gouin was a surveyor and settled on the Northeast Coast of France. (Today on the Detroit side of the Detroit River on the east side of Detroit) 
Gouin, Claude-Jean-Thomas (I03873)
 
10
Dates of birth and death are from the social security death index and are presume to be Patrick's. He was divorced from Frances Dzexk and had no children by her. In 1980 he lived on River street in Olyphant, PA, and worked ina bar on the same street. 
Coulthard, Patrick Jr. (I05049)
 
11
Dorothy LaVoy lived in Tol;edo, OH, at the time of her death in 1998. 
LaVoy, Dorothy (I02396)
 
12
For information for this entry and Noel Langlois dit Traversy's entry see the following website: http://home.inu.net/sadie/noellanglois.htm

The above website also carries the following narative about the Noel Langlois Family:

Your Ancient Canadian Family Ties (Olivier)

Noel Langlois, a courageous fisherman and pilot, originated from France. He was born in 1606, settled at Beauport, in 1634 and married Francoise Garnier at Quebec on 25 July 1634. They had ten children. Noel is the first ancestor of this large family that is known today under the names of Langlois and Langlais. After the death of his first wife on 1 November, 1665, he married Marie Crevet, widow of Robert Caron on 27 July, 1666, at Chateau-Richer. Noel died at Beauport, on 15 July, 1684.

French Canadian & Acadian Review Vol 9-some extracts shown here:
P 208-209 Noel Langlois was a native of Saint-Leonardes-Parcs, Canton of Courtomer, arrondissement of Alencon, Department of Orne. This village is in Normandy, close to its boundary with Perche. Actually it is nearer to Mortagne than it is to Alencon...... It has been said that Noel Langlois was a pilot. This is unlikely, since he could neither read nor write. However, it can be said that he was a ship's carpenter, a trade that his sons Jean Langlois dit Boisverdun and Jean Langlois dit Saint-Jean both practiced. As was the custom, they undoubtedly learned this trade from their father.

In 1665, when Noel Langlois was 59, his wife was gravely wounded. In anticipation of her death, the couple on 31 Oct, 1665, made donations of their property to their two youngest sons. Francoise Garnier died, as expected, and was buried on 1 Nov, 1665.

In the following year, there was a family dispute over the inheritance of the 3 sons of Noel Langlois. The issue arose over the ownership of property on the Isle of Orleans. In 1663, Nicholas Juchereau de Saint-Denys cosiegneur of the fief La Chavallerie on the Isle of Orleans, son of Jean Juchereau de Maur, granted a concession of this fief to the two youngest sons of Noel Langlois. However, upon the marriage of his oldest son, Jean Langlois dit Boisverdun, to Francois-Charlotte Bellanger, in 1665, Noel Langlois purported to give this property to the young couple. This was followed by the donation of the Beauport property to the two youngest sons. The dispute was settled according to the intentions of Noel Langlois, and the property on the Isle of Orleans went to Jean Langlois dit Boisverdun.

On 17 July, 1666, Noel Langlois married Marie Crevet, widow of Robert Caron, whom she had married in 1637 at Quebec. Noel Langlois died on July 14, 1684, at age 78 yrs

------------------------------

Guillaume Langlois was born CA 1581 of St. Leonard, DesParcs, Orne, France, and died prior to July 25, 1634 in Normandie, France. His parentage is unknown.

He married Jeanne Millet, born CA 1585 St. Leonard, Orne, France, and she apparently died in Normandie, France. Her parentage is also unknown.

Their Children: Langlois

1. Noel (See ABOVE) Born June 4, 1606 Alenon, Normandie, France Died: July 14, 1684 Beauport, Canada.
(M) Francoise Garnier/Grenier on July 25, 1634 @ Quebec, Canada (third marriage in Canada)

2. Jean Born ____ Died After Sept 1, 1656 Quebec

-------------------------------

For More information see

Memories de La Societe Genealogique Canadienne-Francaise
(Vol XXVI, No. 2, Apr-Jun 1975)

See the following web site for the information below: Genealogie des Francais d'Amerique du Nord: http://www.francogene.com/genealogie-quebec/005/398.php

Voici la famille de Noël LANGLOIS et Françoise GRENIER ou GARNIER
[189] LANGLOIS, Noël (Guillaume & Jeanne MILLET [239]), né vers 1603 (rec-1681), 1607 (conf-1659) ou 1604 (sép-1684) St-Léonard-des-Parcs (Orne: 610416), France, décédé 1684-07-14, inhumé 1684-07-15 Beauport (Québec)
* mariés 1634-07-25 Québec (Québec)
GRENIER ou GARNIER, Françoise (..), décédée 1665-11-01, inhumée 1665-11-01 Québec (Québec)
1) Anne, baptisée 1637-09-02 Québec (Québec), décédée 1704-03-16, inhumée 1704-03-17 Rivière-Ouelle (Québec), mariée Québec (Québec) 1649-11-09 Jean PELLETIER dit LE GOBLOTEUR
2) Élisabeth ou Isabelle, née vers 1645-02-21, baptisée 1645-03-07 Québec (Québec), décédée 1696-11-18, inhumée 1696-11-19 Cap-St-Ignace (Québec), mariée Québec (Québec) 1662-11-06 Louis CÔTÉ, mariée Québec (Québec) 1669-12-15 Guillaume LEMIEUX
3) Jean1, baptisé 1641-02-24 Québec (Québec), décédé peu avant 1670-07-20 Bourg-la-Reine à Charlesbourg (Québec), marié Château-Richer (Québec) 1665-10-19 Françoise Charlotte BÉLANGER
4) Jean2, baptisé 1648-12-20 (dgfc) Québec (Québec), décédé 1690-10-21, inhumé Hôtel-Dieu de Québec (Québec), cm 1675-12-05 (greffe Pierre Duquet) Marie CADIEUX
5) Jeanne, mariée Québec (Québec) 1656-01-09 René CHEVALIER
6) Marguerite, née vers 1637 (sép-1697), décédée 1697-09-24, inhumée 1697-09-25 Beauport (Québec), mariée Québec (Québec) 1653-10-22 Paul VACHON
7) Marie, née 1646-09-30, baptisée 1646-10-18 Québec (Québec), décédée 1687-08-14, inhumée 1687-08-15 Québec (Québec), mariée Québec (Québec) 1660-08-10 François MIVILLE
8) Noël, marié avant 1677-01-06 Aimée CARON, marié Beauport (Québec) 1686-12-02 Geneviève PARENT

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Noel Langlois

Ancestor on the Pitt and Presse lines: http://www.angelfire.com/rnb/madore/bio/Noel_Langlois.html

One of the founders of New France.

Debarque a Quebec le 24 juin 1634.

C'est le quatrieme mariage celebre au pays et le premier depuis la restitution de Quebec a la France.

OCCUPATION: pilot de navire - charpentier.

Sources:

1- Histoire des Canadiens-Francais par Benjamin Sulte, printed Montreal 1882.

2- Marriage certificate.

3-Jesuit Relations.

Noel was recruited in France as a censituary of Robert Gifart. Noel arrrived in Quebec the 24th of June 1634 aboard the ship the Saint Jean. For the next two months they built the manor for Lord Giffard and on the day the manor was dedicated (25 July,1634) Noel married Francoise Grenier. He was given land at Beauport. After rearing ten children and the death of Francoise he remarried. The Jesuit relations book shows him as a norman pilot and also says he gave a yellow scarf to the church as a christmas offering.

And translated from Robert Rachon`s internet site "Liste des Patronymes":

NOEL LANGLOIS originating in Saint-Leonard of the Parks, or Saint-Leonard de Honfleur, in Normandy, Noël Langlois was born on June 4 1606, son of Guillaume Langlois and Jeanne Millette. Pilot of ship, he arrives with the first quota of colonists recruited by Robert Giffard, to be established in Beauport, in 1634. The Lord of Beauport, June 29 1634, concedes to him 300 arpents of ground, located on the seigniory of Beauport, close to the Montmorency fall.

He marries on July 25 of the same year, at the church Our-Lady of Recouvrance, in Quebec, Francoise Garnier (Attic), of unknown origin. From their union, are born ten children. Three of his children are our direct ancestors as well as two of his sister: Francoise and Marguerite Langlois.

Their son, Jean, our direct ancestor and carpenter of ship, takes the nickname of Boisverdun. Jean Langlois, known as Boisverdun marries in 1665, Francoise-Charlotte Belanger, born in 1650, daughter of the ancestor Francois Belanger and Marie Guyon.

The second son, Noël Langlois, known as Traversy, born on 7 December 1651 and baptized the 24, in Quebec, chooses for partner of life in 1677, Aymee Charon, born towards 1656, daughter of the pioneers, Robert Charon and Marie Crevet. Noël Langlois becomes the first holder of the seigniory of Beauport.

As for the four other girls of the ancestor, they wed with colonists whose names are nowadays strongly widespread.

The first, Anne Langlois, our ancestor, born in 1637, old of hardly 12 years, marries in 1649, Jean Pelletier, known as LeGloboteur, our ancestor. Arrived with his parents, Guillaume Pelletier and Michelle Mabille, our ancestors also.

The second, Jeanne Langlois, baptized on January 1 1643, became the wife on January 9 1656, of Rene Knight, born towards 1626, originating in Anjou.

Then, the third, baptized on March 7 1645, Elisabeth Langlois, marries on November 6 1662, Louis Côte, born in 1635, son of the pioneers, Jean Côte and of Anne Martin.

The fourth, Marie Langlois,our ancestor, baptized on October 18 1646, became wife on August 10 1660, to Francois Miville, said LeSuisse,our ancestor, born in 1634 at Our-Lady of Brouage, arrived with his parents, Pierre Miville, called the Swisse, and of Charlotte Maugis, also our ancestors.

The first families installed in New-France in 1614, counted two pionnieres of the name of Langlois. Francoise Langlois, wife of Pierre Desportes, and mother of Helene Desportes, the first girl to be born in the colony (1620) and our direct ancestor.

The second pionnier Langlois, and sister of Francoise, is Marguerite Langlois, wife of Abraham Martin, known as the Scot, our ancestors also.

The grandmother, Francoise Garnier (Attic), dies following accidentally caused wounds, November 1 1665. She is also our ancestor. Noël Langlois remaries with the mother of her daughter-in-law Aymee Charon, Marie Crevet, July 27 1666, but without any posterity. The ancestor Noël Langlois survives until 14 July 1684, approximately 80 years of age.






























 
Langlois, Noel (I10043)
 
13
Francis C. LaVoy was the fifth son of the seven sons of Charles LaVoy, the first born American LaVoy. He also had two younger sisters, Mary and Esther. According to his elaborate funeral card, held by his great granddaughter, Lynne LaVoy Warren, Francis was born March 17, 1838. Following the French-Canadian custom, he was named after his uncle, Francis LaVoy III. The name Francis or Frank is very popular among the LaVoys and Francis C. LaVoy named a son Francis as well.

When Francis' father died in 1858, he took over the management of the family farm, as he is listed as the head of the household in the 1860 Census. His mother, Catherine Robidou, continued to live on the farm along with Francis' younger brother Moses and his two sisters. Francis was only 21 at the time.

He later bought this farm from his parents' estate and the home was still standing in the 1970's until destroyed by a tornado. This home was located on property now owned by Rick Murbach, at 8720 Suder Rd., in Erie Township. It was built in a cape cod style, typical of French homes of that period which were not log cabins, with two dormers in front, looking remarkably similar to the home currently on the property. It was located about where the drive way is now, close to Suder Road.

The two brothers, Francis and Moses, were quite close to each other. Fr. Lambert LaVoy reports that the two of them would go around the two weeks after New Year's Day serenading their neighbors with improvised songs as was the French Canadian custom for young men. In return they were plied with drinks and food. However, it was said that the songs were often satirical of their hosts which caused them to make quick and unceremonious leaves on occasion.

His descendants state that Francis wore long and flowing dark hair like an Indian native. He became a Justice of the Peace in Vienna, now known as Erie. He is said by Fr. LaVoy to have married so many people in his role as J.P. that Vienna was nicknamed "Justice Junction".

His occupation did cause some stress in some branches of the very Catholic LaVoy family who felt everyone should have a religious ceremony in the Catholic Church. He himself, however, remained a staunch Catholic to the end as his grandson, Curtis LaVoy, reports that his grandfather would have nothing to do with him as he was not born a Catholic. Curtis was allowed, however, to be at the bedside of his dying grandmother, Mary Dusseau LaVoy.

Francis married Mary Dusseau in about 1863, most likely in St. Joseph's Church in Erie, MI. She was the daughter of Oliver Dusseau and Millie Pete/Petit and was born about 1846 in Erie, MI. The Dusseau Family is descended from Tousaint Toupin, Lord DuSault, a Canadian feudal lord. Her further ancestry may be found in Fr. Christian Denissen's genealogical dictionary, The French Families of the Detroit River Region. Mary died October 1, 1922 in Erie, MI, age about 78 years, of bronchopneumonia and a hip fracture, surviving her husband by four years.

There were fifteen known children from this marriage, although family tradition has it there were more. These children were as follows: (1) Henry Charles LaVoy who also became a Justice of the Peace; (2) Mary Amelia ("Millie") LaVoy who married Charles Sommers of Toledo, OH; (3) Francis F. LaVoy who married Mary Aubrey and was a grocer at one time in Toledo; (4) Emma R, aka Virginia LaVoy who married Samuel J. Featherstone and resided in Toledo; (5) Regina LaVoy, who married James Fielding of Toledo; (6) Augustina LaVoy who married a Mr. Aubrey of Toledo; (7) Anna LaVoy who married Mr Axley of Toledo; (8) a still born male in 1877; (9) a still born male in 1878; (10) Cleophus ("Clifford") LaVoy who married Sylvia Drew and was a carpenter as well as an employee of the Wayne County Road Commision and resided in Erie and Petersburg, MI; (11) Eva LaVoy who married twice: to Daniel M. Labute and to Mr. O'Connor and resided in Detroit; (12) Ada LaVoy who married Dennis Gay of Maumee, OH; (13) Victoria LaVoy; (14) Veronica LaVoy; (15) Marian LaVoy.


Francis C. LaVoy died on April 17, 1916, age 78 years and one month. He is buried in St. Joseph's Cemetery in Erie, MI.

The verse on his prayer card, made of thick black cardboard with white writing, reads as follows:

"In loving Rembrance: Gone but not forgotten

"A precious one from us has gone,
A voice we loved is stilled;
A place is vacant in our home,
Which never can be filled.
God in His wisdom has recalled,
The boon his love has given,
And though the body slumbers here,
The soul is safe in Heaven."

 
LaVoy, Francis C. J.P. (I00054)
 
14
II-5-8: Matilda Fluck, the eighth child of Aaron Fluck, Sr. and Lydia Ann Tombow, was born 10 September 1878, Hume, IL (Fluck Bible). The 1900 Federal Census for Whiteside County, IL, has her entry serving as a domestic with the James F. Wetzell Family in Hume (Entry 354/359). At the time of her mother's death in 1924, she was living with her. Whiteside County, IL marriage records indicate she married her deceased sister's husband, William Wesley McGarrah, 4 January 1927. No children. She died about 1940. May have died in Anaheim, CA. Associated with E.H. Stockwell. May be relation to husband William. No children.

Compiled by Patrick L. Tombeau 1 May 1993  
Fluck, Matilda (I04557)
 
15
Julia LaVoy was the twin of Lucille LaVoy. 
LaVoy, Julia (I01107)
 
16
see Tanguay, Genealogical Dictionary, Vol. 1, p. 209. Tanguay has an error in Pierre Dufresne's death date. It cannnot be in 1637 as he would only be 10 years old and he had his last child born 17 october 1776. So his death date would be after 1775. Tanguay states he died suddenly. No parents or place of orgin noted in Tanguay for Pierre DuFresne.

Information in this entry about Rene Mineau/Minaud and his wife and her parents and his parents can be found in A Look Backward: http://www.delmars.com/family/perrault/2386.htm 
Dufresne, Pierre (I10254)
 
17
The Descendants of Sarah A. Tombow

The descendants of Sarah Tombow and her two husbands, Amos N. Bowers and William Weaver, havealso been traced by Dorothy Tombow Boulware, RR2, BOX 311-b, Argyle, TX, 76226 (2005) in her book "Tambos, Tombo, Tombow from 1780's" which may be found in the Lancaster Mennonite Historical Society Library and the Lancaster County Historical Society Library.

As pointed out previously in the chapter on the Origins of the Family, the founding parents, William Tombos and Mary Ann Herzkey, had six children: John Tombow, William Tombow, Jr., Mary Ann Tombow, Sarah Tombow, Lydia Tombow, and Catherine Tombow (Miscellaneous Records, Lancaster County Orphans Court, September, l858, pp. l78-l79).

This chapter of the History discusses the descendants of William and Mary Herzkey Tombos' fourth child, Sarah A. Tombow. According to her death certificate and the cemetery records of Mellinger's Cemetery, Sarah Tombow was born l May l820. She was born in E. Lampeter Township, Lancaster County, Pennsylvania and spent her childhood on the property of her father described in the chapter on the Family Origins.

According to the customs of the day, her name most likely derives from her maternal grandmother in Holland.

The records of Trinity Lutheran Church record a marriage to Amos N. Bowers on l0 November l840. In this record her name is spelled Sarah Tombows. Amos N. Bowers was alive on 26 March l845. as he is mentioned in a deed between William Tombos, Sr. and his son William Tombow, Jr. (Deeds, G-7-8l). In this Deed, William, Sr., states his intent to deed land to his son which would be adjacent to land he was deeding that day to Amos N. Bowers. It is not clear at this writing whether such a transaction actually took place between William Tombos and Amos N. Bowers. A review of the Grantee Index of Deeds may clarify this matter.

Nothing further is known about this marriage or the fate of Amos N. Bowers at this writing. Sarah, however, had remarried to William Weaver by the late l840's from data obtained in the l860 Federal Census (See below). Whatever happened to Amos N. Bowers, therefore, happened in the few years between 26 March l845 and l848 or l849.

The Index to the l850 Census has bee reviewed for the names of Amos N. Bowers, Sarah Bowers, and William Weaver. There is an Amos Bowers living in the City of Lancaster with another family. He is 32 years old. No entry for Amos N. Bowers or Sarah Bowers has been found in Lancaster County, Pennsylvania. Three William Weavers were indexed for Lancaster County, but a review of their Census entries rules them out as the William Weaver married to Sarah Tombow.

As for possible children of this first marriage of Sarah Tombow to Amos N. Bowers, the l860 Census does not record children with the last name of Bowers living with Sarah and William Weaver. However, children of the first marriage would have been old enough to be living as extra help with other families as was common in this period.

Nonetheless next to Sarah Weaver's grave, row 5 in Mellinger's Mennonite Cemetery, there is a stone for a William J. Bowers who was born l5 August l842 and died l8 Febrary l878. This man was old enough to have served in the Civil War and his military and pension records should be sought in the National Archives for possible clarification. Further the records of the Lancaster Mennonite Society Library may also contain information on this matter.

Also in the same row a Rebecca J. Landis is buried next to a son of Sarah Tombow Weaver, Jacab A. Weaver. She was born l3 July l845 and died l8 May l92l. Her death certificate in the Bureau of Vital Statistics, Harrisburg PA., should clarify who her father was. She appears to be the Mrs. Rebecca (Henry) Landis mentioned in Sarah Tombow Weaver's and Jacob A. Weaver's obituaries quoted below.

Sarah A. Tombow married a second time to William Weaver. As their oldest child is reported to be l0 years old in the l860 Census taken on l9 June l860 it can be assumed that their marriage took place in the late l840's. As they appear to be Mennonites, the marriage must be looked for in the Trinity Lutheran Church or Reformed German Church Records of Lancaster, as the State required marriages to be performed by ordained clergy at that time.

The following entry was found in the l860 Federal Census of Lancaster County, Providence Township, p. 6l7, dwelling #224:

William Weaver, 35, laborer, born in Prussia, real estate valued at $300, personal property at $l00.
Sarah Weaver, age 40, born in Pennsylvania
John M. Weaver, age l0, born in Pennsylvania, attends school
Catherine Weaver, age 8, born in Pennsylvania, attends school
Jacob Weaver, age 6, born in Pennsylvania
Lidia A. Weaver, age 3, born in Pennsylvania

No further Census work has been done on this family.

Sarah Tombow Weaver died 28 June l906 at the age of 86 years, l month and 27 days of tuberculosis of the lungs, according to her death certificate filed in the Bureau of Vital Statistics in Harrisburg, PA. The certificate states her father was William Tombow. Death occurred at 8 o'clock in the evening.

The following two obituaries were published on p. 5 of the Lancaster New Era 29 June l906:

"Death of Mrs. Sarah Weaver

Mrs. Sarah Weaver died at the home of her son-in-law, Henry Landis, no. 333 East Marion street, on Thursday evening, in her 87th year, death being due to general debility. The deceased was born near Smoketown, but had lived in this city many years. She had been twice married. The following children survive: Mrs. Landis, Mrs. Givler, Jacob and John Weaver, city; Mrs Jacob Reese, New Providence; Mrs Jacob Miller, Philadelphia. The funeral will be held on Sunday at l pm at the house and at two o'clock at Mellinger's Meeting House."

Also appearing on that date in that newspaper:

"WEAVER on June 28, l906, in this city, Mrs. Sarah Weaver, in her 87th year.
The relatives and friends of the family are respectfully invited to attend the funeral from the residence of her daughter, Mrs Harry Landis, No. 333 East Marion street, on Sunday afternoon at one o'clock at the house, and at two o'clock at Mellinger's Meeting House. Interment at graveyard."

Sarah Weaver Tombow's tombstone stand today in Mellinger's Mennonite Cemetery, row 5. It states she is the daughter of William Tombow. Its inscription has not been transcribed completely at this writing.

The date of her husband, William Weaver's death and his place of burial are unknown at this writing as he is not buried in row five with his wife, Sarah. No Will has been found for either Sarah or William Weaver.

Sarah's known and possible children at his writing are:

IV-l William J. Bowers (possible) He is buried next to Sarah in row five of Mellinger's Cemetery. He was born l5 August l842 and died l8 February l878 at the age of 36 years, 6 months and three days.

IV-2 Rebecca (Bowers ?), wife of Henry Landis of No. 333 E. Marion St., city of Lancaster. A Rebecca J. Landis is buried in row 5 of Mellinger's Cemetery next to Jacob A Weaver, her possible brother. Her dates are l3 July l845 to l8 May l92l.

The Census index was consulted for the name of Rebecca Bowers in l850, but her name was not found as a separate entry in Lancaster County

IV-3 (Sarah A.) wife of Jacob R. Givler, as it would appear from a document in papers disposing of the property at 224 East Frederick St., dated l0 January l923. This petition is signed by Sarah A. Givler, Martha M. McFarland, and John B. Givler (the last two presumably the children of Jacob R. Givler and his wife Sarah.) (Deeds, Y-25-454 and N-1-4l7)

IV-4 Jacob A. Weaver, born 2 January l853, died 22 February l9l4 of pulmonary tuberculosis, buried in row five of Mellinger's Cemetery, next to Rebecca J. Landis. His obituary is recorded on p. 2 of the 23 February l9l4 issue of the Lancaster New Era as follows:

"Death of Jacob A. Weaver

The death of Jacob A. Weaver occurred at his home, No. l30 South Water Street, the cause being tuberculosis. The wife of the deceased is dead, but there are three surviving children: Mrs Anna Deroof, of Harrisburg, and John H. and George F., of this city. The following brothers and sisters also survive: J.M. Weaver of Oneville, N.Y.; Mrs. Kate Miller. of Philadelphia; Mrs. Rebecca Landis of Lancaster, and Mrs Lydia Reese of New Providence. The funeral will be held on Wednesday afternoon at l:30 o'clock at the house and interment will be made in the cemetery adjoining Mellinger's meeting House."

A search for a will for Jacob A. Weaver was negative.

IV-5 John M. Weaver who was living in Oneville, N.Y. in l9l4, according to his brother Jacob's obituary (See above entry). He is mentioned in the family's l860 Federal Census entry, cited above, with an age of l0 years, giving him a birth year of l850.)

IV-6 Lydia Weaver who married Jacob Reese and who lived in New Providence, Pennsylvania in the l906 obituary of her mother and the l9l4 obituary of her brother Jacob. (See above obituaries). She is mentioned in the l860 Federal Census, cited above, age 3, giving her a birth year of l857.)

IV-7 Catherine Weaver ("Kate") married Jacob Miller and was living in Philadelphia in l906 and l9l4, according to the obituaries of her mother and her brother, Jacob Weaver, quoted above. Catherine is mentioned in the family entry in the l860 Federal Census as 8 years old giving her a birth year of l852.

One other possible child of Sarah Tombow and William Weaver is buried in row five of Mellinger's Cemetery:

IV-8 Sarah S Weaver (possible) 3 December l860 to 29 April l877.

The l870 and l880 Federal Census entries for the William and Sarah Weaver family may resolve these issues.

Nothing further is known at this writing about the family and descendants of Sarah A. Tombow, fourth child of William Tombos and Mary Ann Herzkey, and Sarah's two husbands, Amos N. Bowers and William Weaver.

Advertisements have been placed in both the Genealogical Helper (Sept/ Oct, l989) and the Pennsylvania Mennonite Heritage Magazine in l990 for descendants of this family, but no respondents have replied.
 
Tombow, Sarah (I07258)
 
18

According to records, Mary's last name is Roe or Rowe.

per
Katie Reaume
katreaume@gmail.com  
Roe (Rowe), Mary (I08864)
 
19 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Tranchida, Janet Rose (I06863)
 
20
Doug was married for a short time. I looked for the dates and cannot find them. He was married to a Kimberly Andrews for about three years they were married and divorced in Jackson County Mississippi. Yes we pronounce our name like "ou" in house, Doug was called house cat would of been the way he pronounced it but wrote it "Houskat". Every one of my brothers work with their hands. Scott is a mechanic, Donnie is a ship fitter. I am so glad you liked the photo of Doug it showed him doing what he loved. Thank you again.

Julie (Houska) Lessard 
Houska, Douglas Ray ("Housekat") (I00479)
 
21
Hi Patrick,
Hope this finds you in good health! Myself I’ve had some major setbacks in health including a severe car accident; unfortunately I still face a couple more surgeries & have some memory loss issues. I have been unable to access and update any of my ancestry pages yet.
My Uncle David C. La Bute Sr. {brother to Frank G. LaBute Sr. & son of Harold La Bute} has also been researching the family. I would like to put you in direct contact with him. Please let me know if you would like me to give him your contact information.
I moved in 2004 my current address, phone & email listed below.
Best wishes, Many Blessings & God Bless,
Kim~

334 Kensington
Newport, MI. 48166
734-799-7381
Kimberly Kathleen La Bute-McKeny-Muszynski
Kimba~ Kimmy K~ Kimmie~
http://www.facebook.com/itskimba
Kimbaco43@charter.net
http://tinyurl.com/KIMBAmyspacePROFILE 
LaBute, Kimberly (I08944)
 
22
Thanks for updating the information on the website. I know Lynne and Roger also. They are my mother's cousins. That is interesting about where they live. I do not think my mother is aware of this. She will be interested in knowing that they are so close to the cabin where Francois and White Feather lived. Is there any information about the tribe itself that White Feather was from? Is there information about where the tribe ended up? I am interested in that information. Do you know how I could research for the information?
My father has a scanner. I will see if he can get the pictures to you. My oldest son is a senior in high school and is taking a digital photography class. I will have him take pictures of the bow for you and send them in an email. My grandfather Curtis and his brother Ivan owned 40 acres of land in Michigan together. They would go bow hunting on their property. My grandfather told me it was the only way to hunt for deer. My mother told me that her Uncle Ivan made bows and sold them. I know he sold guns also. They had a cabin on the 40 acres. They had to sell the land because the state wanted to put a road through it.
If my sisters want their information updated on your website, I will get the information for you.
Have a good holiday.
Gloria Anslow

Patrick Tombeau wrote:
I have recorded the latest information from your last two emails and I thank you for your informative and interesting letters. It is rare to hear of LaVoys moving away so far, although I do correspond with a LaVoy in Shanghai, China, and another one I will meet for the first time in Barcelona, Spain. (My wife and I are going to Spain and Portugal next Spring.)

Your story about your grandfather's bow is most interesting. There are some more things related to our Indian ancestry in the Monroe County Historical Society ground floor exhibits, most notably a papoose carrier made by our Indian ancesstress, White Feather. If you look in Marie Gouin's entry you will probalby find a shot of it.

I would appreciate it if you will get me two pictures of the bow: one taking the whole thing in and one focusing on the connection of the string to the bow and any thing else unusual about the bow.

With respect to putting things on the Tombeau.net, you scan and send the identified pictures to me by attachment and then I send them on to my processor who puts them on the site as I am not very good with computer tricks.

By chance I have known your great uncle Ivan's children, Lynne and Roger for many years. She helped setup our last reunion in 1997. They live in Temperance, MI, less than a quarter mile from the original log cabin site of Francois LaVoy and White Feather aka Marie Gouin LaVoy on the same road, Dean Road. See what I mean: 200 years later and still within a stone's throw. Every year she sends a nice Christmas letter along reflecting on what happened during the year in the family and in the world.

I also wrote your grandfather Curtis many years ago when he was in Oak Ridge, TN, but I was told he would probably not respond. So you're right: he did not like to talk family. Besides I see how old he was and I don't blame him a bit for not writing me. You have good longevity genes in you.

Well, I am glad you are thinking of sending pictures and I hope to hear from you again. I try to keep people's addresses on file, since email addresses change so much. So if you don't mind, send one along. I also have in mind that the person i am emailing is down the road until I see their address. Occasionally this helps me bring people together. I put three distant cousins together who were searching the same tree but did not know about each other until all three independently wrote to me though my site.

I live at 1462 Middlewood Drive, Saline, MI, 48176-1278. It is just south of Ann Arbor, MI where U of M is, and 40 miles west of Detroit down Michigan Ave.

----- Original Message -----
From: Gloria Anslow
To: Patrick Tombeau
Sent: Tuesday, November 20, 2007 11:38 PM
Subject: Re: Proposed Change: Gloria Stewart (I02469)


Hello again.
My parents were missionaries to India. They were actually teachers and taught other missionary's children. We grew up in a boarding school. All four of us were born in India and grew up there. When we graduated from high school we came back to the United States to go to college. My two older sisters, Lily and Kathy have stayed at home and raised their children. I am a registered nurse and have worked always. My younger sister, Phyllis, works in a grocery store and has no children. Lily Ann married Terence Yoder from West Liberty, Ohio. Her husband is the oldest of seven children. His father had a dairy farm, which I believe is managed by one of Terry's younger brothers.
My father Kenneth Norman Steward was born in Minneapolis. He is the second of three boys. His parents were father, Merle Winnie Steward born in Edgerton, Minnesota (I forgot to get the dates.) and mother, Ethel Josephine Condon, born in Minneapolis, Minnesota. (I forgot to get the dates.) Both are deceased. Merle and Ethel were married in Minneapolis.
My mother's parents. Father, Curtis C. Lavoy, born August 7, 1901 in Deerfield, MI and died December 28, 1997 in Oak Ridge, TN and mother, Lillian Josephine Samson born June 23, 1905 (I forgot to get the place) and died December 1, 1990 in Oak Ridge, TN. Curtis and Lillian had moved there to live near their daughter Sylvia LaVoy Rice and her family.
Lily Ann was born in Nasik City, India
Kathleen Dawn Steward was born in Nasik City, India
I was also born in Nasik City, India
Phyllis Eileen Steward was born in Chinchpada, India
My father Kenneth Steward has traveled extensively to research his family's lineage. He has written his memoir's and is having the book published. I am anxious to read the book. He has a lot of interesting stories.
I will call my parents again and obtain the additional information to fill in the blanks. In regards to the athena. My husband was in special forces in the army. While he was a captain he was nicknamed the "War God". When we were setting up email addresses later on he came up with using aris for himself and athena for me. I added dark to athena because someone else had used the athena and I have dark brown hair.
I do not know a Brandi Walczak. My mother has pictures and will get them together to add. How do we add pictures?
Thanks for your interest. A reunion sounds interesting.
Gloria Anslow

Patrick Tombeau wrote:
Thank you very much. If you are inclined, tell me about how the family happened to be in India, and what town you were born in.

Your sister Lily Ann married into the Lancaster Co., PA, Pennsylvania Dutch family of Yoder. My father's ancestors, despite the French spelling of the name, came from that county and were also Pennsylvnia Dutch.

Some ambiguity as to whether your father Kenneth Norman Steward was born in Minneapolis or married there. Please advise. What were his parents' names?

Where you have only dates, could you give me a town as well for the birth or marriage?

Looking forward to any pictures you might have of the old LaVoy Family.

I had another LaVoy cousin write me using athena in her email adsress. Do you know a Brandi Walczak?

Are your parents still living?

Hope to hear from you soon.

I----- Original Message -----
From: darkathena357@yahoo.com
To: tombeau@comcast.net
Sent: Tuesday, November 20, 2007 9:13 PM
Subject: Proposed Change: Gloria Stewart (I02469)


Proposed Change: Gloria Stewart (I02469)
Tree: Tombeau Family Tree

Description: Gloria Ruth Steward
Born December 30, 1954 in India
Married August 22, 1986
Husband David Douglas Anslow
Born December 31, 1952 in Illinois
Children
John Kenneth Anslow
Born September 18, 1989 in Illinois
James Curtis Anslow
Born September 8, 1995 in Illinois

Gloria Anslow
darkathena357@yahoo.com

 
LaVoy, Ivan D. (I00133)
 
23



The Homes of Harvey Joseph Dusseau

Harvey Joseph Dusseau, the writer's grandfather, distinguished himself
by the number of homes he lived in during his life time. They were often
rented, sometimes behind his hardware stores with blankets on clothes
lines for walls, but he also built several of the homes he lived in
or live in homes to which he made significant renovations, as his family
increased in size.

Harvey Joseph Dusseau was born in Toledo, Ohio, 5 January 1890, the son
Samuel Levi Dusseau and Matilda Mary Jarvis. During his childhood he
lived on Dorr St., first over his father's grocery store, and then in
the house he helped his father build next door.

On 30 April 1912 he married Gertrude LaVoy of Erie, Michigan, in St. Jo-
seph's Church. From 1912-1915 he lived in a store down from the State-
line home of his father-in-law, Moses LaVoy, Sr., and across the street
from a Protestant Church, according to his daughter, Lucille Dusseau
Tambeau.

These accomodations were shared with his wife's sister, Julia LaVoy, and
her husband, Elroy Deszell.

His first child, Charles Robert Dusseau, was born into these
circumstances on September 8, 1913, in the home of his maternal
grandfather, Moses LaVoy, Sr. Since the bedrooms were acorss the
Stateline in Ohio, it is Toledo, not Erie, MI, that is his birthplace,
as it was also for his sister Lucille Dusseau.

The Polk City Directories for Detroit indicate that Harvey Dusseau and
his growing family lived in the following rented homes:
1916- 839, later 4305, 15th St at the corner of its intersection with
Buchanan. Harvey's occupation is listed as a machinist.

His second child, Lucille Mary Cecilia Dusseau, was born 21 February
1916, her mother traveling from this home in Detroit to her parents'
home on Stateline to give birth to her.

1917- 73, later 2315 Buchanan. His brother Henry lives with him during
this year. Harvey Dusseau is listed as a machinist. His brother, Henry
is listed as a laborer.

1918- 73, later 2315 Buchanan. Harvey Dusseau is listed as a plater. His
brother Henry has moved elsewhere.

Rudolph Lawrence Dusseau, Harvey Dusseau's third child, was born August
2, 1918, named after his uncle Rudolph Dusseau, the World War I hero of
the family.

1919- 825, later 2645 Ferry Park. He is listed as a plater

1920-21: 827, later 2649 Ferry Park. He is listed as a plater.

(Next door at 2645, Elroy and Julia LaVoy Desell live for this
year only)

Harvey's fourth child, Blanche Eleanore Dusseau, is born August 15,
1920.

1921-22: 2649 Ferry Park, Harvey Desseau (sic) is listed as a nickle
plater.

The Polk City Directories have no further entries in the following years
reflecting a move to Royal Oak, Michigan, in Oakland County.

In 1922 Harvey moved to the Judson Subdivision in Royal Oak and during
the winter of 1922-23 lived in a tent on the lot while he was building a
house with his brother-in law, Elroy Deszell.

This was on Garden St and another house was also built by Henry and his
brother-in-law Elroy Deszell next door. The two houses built are
currently located at 3111 and 3115 Garden St., Royal Oak. The house tent
was said to have existed on the lot currently occupied by 3115 Garden.

It was while living in the garage noted above that Harvey's fifth child,
Bernadette May Dusseau, was born on 25 May 1923, as the writer's mother
has an image of holding her infant ister in this garage.

In 1923 he moved to two flats above the Hardware Store he bought at 3458
Oakwood Blvd., now 12 Mile Road. Eventually he rented the flat out over
the store and moved his family to an apartment behind the hardware
store, which he enlarged for this purpose. He remained here until 1928.

The Berkley City directories which begin in 1925, note in the 1925-26
and 1927-28 directory, the existence of the Harvey J. Dusseau Hardware
at the above address. This hardware store was torn down and is now
occupied by a bowling alley.

On 8 January 1925, his fourth child, Blanche Eleanore Dusseau died of
diptheria while living behind the Hardware store on Oakwood Blvd. Two
years later, while still living in the same quarters, Harvey's sixth
child, Rose Mary Madeleine Dusseau was born on 13 July 1927.

In 1928 he moved for about six months to a hardware store located on
Meyers, near West Chicago, in Detroit and lived with his family behind
the store. The writer's mother went to McKenzie H.S. for six months at
this time.

Harvey's seventh child, Joseph Raymond Susseau, was born on Oxctober 29,
1928.

In 1929-30, the Polk City Directories indicate he lived at the Hardware
Store located at 20307 Fenkell (5 Mile Rd) in Detroit. Again the family
lived in quarters behind the store.

During the Bank Crash, Harvey lost $200-300 he had in a bank and moved
back to Berkley.
In 1930-31 he lived again behind his hardware store on Oakwood Blvd.

From 1931-36 he rented three homes at 3303 and 3331 Garden and a third
on Oakshire in Berkley.

On 17 March 1936, Harvey's eighth and last child, Patrick James Dusseau
was born.

Two months later, on 8 May 1936, Harvey purchases his first home at 1455
Dorothea in Berkley for $2,200 on a land contract. While living in this
house, he raised it up and dug a basement for it and then raised the
roof to build an upper flat for renters.

On 19 April 1944 Gertrude Sarah LaVoy Dusseau, Harvey's long suffering
wife of 32 years died of a post-operative embolism, having lived in her
first permanent home since her marriage for only eight years. Much of
that eight years spent in renovations described above.

On 29 July 1947, Harvey and his second wife, Alice Marie Fortin, sold
the house on Dorothea. He had married her about six months after the
death of his first wife.

Four days later, on 2 August 1947 Harvey and his second wife purchased
the home at 8228 Brace in Detroit. On the day they moved in the writer
remembers being startled by his Uncle Patrick Dusseau riding on his
bicycle into the writer's front yard at 6461 Mead, in Dearborn, several
miles away down Warren Avenue to announce they had moved into the new
home.

On 7-25-49 Harvey purchased three lots 638. 639. and 640, on a dirt road
which is now Beech-Daly Road in Redford, MI, and built with his own
hands a cinder block house now located at 13965 Beech-Daly. During a
rainy muddy fall he built his home where his second wife died.

Harvey made the purchase of another property in Redford for his tool
shop, located a block or two north of Plymouth Road, west of Telegraph,
at 12060 Woodbine. The property is now incorporated within a larger
structure built by subsequent owners.

On 8 April 1950, Harvey and his wife, Alice, sold the property at 8228
Brace to his step-son Harry W. Fortin and his wife Ramona.

On 21 May 1950 he sold the tool shop to another party
On the same day he sold his Beech-Daly home and two side lots to his
step-son as well.

After his second wife died, Harvey Joseph Dusseau moved almost
immediately, some time in 1950 to the Watts area of Los Angeles, CA,
where he died of cancer on 11 December 1951 at the age of 61 years, 11
months and 6 days. His body was returned to Michigan for burial in Holy
Sepulchre Cemetery, 25800 Ten Mile Road, Southfield, next to his first
wife, Gertrude LaVoy, sect. 16, lot 215, tier 1, graves 1 and 2. 
Dusseau, Harvey Joseph (I00014)
 
24 The Family Origins

Our Family History begins with William Tombos who settled in E. Lampeter Township, Lancaster County, Pennsylvania. His naturalization papers, dated l November l852, indicate that he came to this country at the age of 9 years in the year l802. In these papers he forswears any further allegiance to the "King and Stadtholder of Holland". On this evidence our Family is of Dutch descent. Oral traditions carried down to this day by the descendants of John Tombow of E. Greenville, Ohio, confirm this conclusion. Similar statements are recorded by a descendant of another branch of the Tombow Family, Lydia Tombow Fluck, in the Chapman Brothers' Portrait and Biographical Album of Whiteside Co., Illinois.

The exact place of origin in the Netherlands is unknown. However, his naturalization papers in 1852 indicate that he foreswore allegiance to the Stadtholder of Holland. At this time in history, the Netherlands consisted of a loose federation of independent states ruled over by William of Orange. One of these states was called Holland. Today this state has been divided into two provinces of today's Netherlands: North Holland and South Holland. Other clues to his origin may be in the fact that he did not settle in Philadelphia, the most likely port of entry, but in the rural farmland surrounding the city of Lancaster, Pennsylvania. This suggests that he probably came from a rural community in one of the current provinces of Holland. Research has yet to determine the ship on which William Tombos came, or who he came with at the age of 9, which might provide further clues. The likely port of entry is nearby Philadelphia.

We do have some other clues that might assist us. Based on the naming of the children, which followed certain patterns in the Nineteenth Century among German and Dutch ethnic groups, William Tombos' parents were probably William and Sarah Tombos. This conclusion is drawn from the custom of naming the first born son and daughter after the maternal grandparents and the second born son and daughter after the paternal grandparents. The first born son and daughter in this family were named John and Mary. And, indeed, the maternal grandparents were John and Mary Herzkey. The second born son and daughter were named William and Sarah.

Another clue is provided to us in the religion of the founding parents. Catholics generally reside in the southern sections of the Netherlands, while Protestants reside in the north. William and Mary Tombos were buried in Mellinger's Mennonite Cemetery as were several of their children, and some grandchildren. Family oral traditions in the John Tombow descendants confirm a Mennonite tradition in the early Family. William Tombow, Jr., was buried in Science Ridge Mennonite Cemetery in Sterling, Whiteside County, Illinois, and some of his children were farmed out to Mennonite families. Further, no baptisms, but only marriages, of the early Family have been found in the Trinity Lutheran Church Records in the city of Lancaster. As the archivist of this church, Debra D. Smith, CGRS, pointed out to me in a letter, dated December 4, l989: Mennonites had no ordained clergy so the State directed them to marry in churches with ordained clergy, but their adult baptisms were done in their own churches.

The Mennonites are a Protestant group formed during the Reformation by a Swiss Catholic priest, Menno Simons, in l536. The Netherlands became a site of Mennonite religious growth. Mennonites believe in adult baptism, objected to the state religions in Europe at the time of their founding, believe in non-resistance and are pacifists. Mennonites consider themselves non-conformists, separating themselves from all political activities. They are strongly allied to the Amish people in their belief in the simple life apart from the world and a brotherhood among believers who practice mutual aid. So important to the Mennonites and Amish is the concept of the "plain life" unadorned by worldly pleasures that more conservative factions have broken off again and again over the years from the Mennonites, starting with the Amish in l693, in order to follow a more rigorous interpretation of the simple life.

Issues which have led to splits from parent groups have included whether buttons were too worldly to use to fasten clothes and only hook-and-eye fasteners should be used. The Amish feel any color other than black is worldly, while the Mennonites hold to a less conservative dress code.

While our founding parents, William and Mary Tombos, and their children held to the Mennonite beliefs, it is clear that they were abandoned by their grandchildren as their many grandsons, six bearing the Tombow name, marched off to the Civil War on the Union side, abandoning the pacifist beliefs of their parents and grandparents.

Today the Family belongs to the main line Protestant groups: Congregationalists, Methodists, and Presbyterians. One branch, the descendants of my grandfather, have reverted back to Catholicism.

As we puzzle over the origins of our Family in Europe, an understanding of influences in the political and economic areas must be considered. In l802, when William Tombos came to the United States, according to his naturalization papers in the Lancaster County Court of Common Pleas, the Netherlands was no longer the mighty sea power she had been a century before. Seaport towns were dying all along the coast and the mercantile class had fallen on hard times. Politically, the House of Orange, ruled over by a series of men named William, had been deposed by Napoleon's armies in the name of democratic reforms. These were hard times for royalists and merchants.

The evidence indicates that William Tombos was a merchant, or trader, rather than a farmer during most of his years here. His land and animal holdings provided him only with food for his family and none for the marketplace. His name, and the probable name of his father, also suggests royalist sympathies.

The name William has remained a popular name in the Family for two hundred years. At this writing the writer has come across 10 men bearing the name of William Tombow or Tambeau.

William Tombos was born in the Netherlands in l787. This date was arrived at from an entry in the Smith Family Bible which records his death in l858 at the age of 7l.

The Smith Family Bible was owned by the Family of Thomas Smith and Mary Ann Tombow, a daughter of William Tombos. Its current owner is a descendant of this couple, Irene Westphal of Marshall, Minnesota.

If l787 is the date of his birth, this does not agree with his statements on his naturalization papers which state he was nine years old in l802, making the date of his birth l793. In the l850 Census, his age is given as 6l, making his birth year, l789. The writer is inclined to give more credence to a Family Bible Record than a Census or William's memory of his age at immigration 50 years after the event.

We know nothing at this time of his early years between l802 and his marriage date. On l7 January l8ll in Trinity Lutheran Church in the city of Lancaster, Pennsylvania, William Tombos married Mary Herzkey, or Herskiel, the daughter of Johan Henrich Herzkey and the widow Mary Holzhausen. This latter couple themselves were married in Trinity Lutheran Church on 2 September l788.

According to entries in the Smith Family Bible, Mary Herzkey Tombos was born 2l October l793, most likely in Lancaster County where her father owned land.

William Tombos and his wife Mary Herzkey settled in E. Lampeter Township, east of the city of Lancaster, where they lived out the rest of their lives. The site of their homestead is believed to be the site of the current day Locust Grove Mennonite School on the Old Philadelphia Turnpike, but confirmation awaits a closer inspection of Deeds in the Lancaster County Court House. If this is the site of their home, then nothing today remains of the frame buildings, orchards and out buildings described in William Tombos' l858 Probate Records.

A review of Lancaster County Deeds indicates that the couple's first land purchase was made on 7 September l825 from John Weidle and his wife Catherine. Catherine was Catherine Herzkey Weidle, Mary Herzkey Tombos' sister. The land was originally their father's and had been in the Herzkey Family since l793. The land was a small parcel 3/4 of an acre plus six perches, or rods, a rod being equal to l6.5 feet. The land was located in E. Lampeter and the sale price was $l (Deeds, S-5-222). Six years later this land was deeded to Hyman Meyers on 30 March l83l. In this Deed William's last name is spelled Tombos (Deeds, S-5-220).

The next purchase of land made by William and Mary Tombos was made on 2l April l828 from John Petersheim and wife for $60l.65. This land is described as being l4 acres and 52 perches and was located on the Old Philadelphia and Lancaster Road in Lampeter Township. In this sale William's last name is spelled Tombow (Deeds, N-5-286).

William and Mary added to this purchase on l April l84l by purchasing a small parcel, "one acre and 6 perches neat measure" from their neighbor, James Wilson for $l08.93. William's name was spelled Tombos in this Deed (S-6-74).

(William Tombos' youngest daughter, Catherine Tombow, married Robert Wilson. It is has not been established whether William's son-in-law was his neighbor's son.)

It is on the above two purchases in E. Lampeter that William and Mary Tombos raised their families and lived out their lives.

In all, at the time of his death, William Tombos owned l5 acres of land, described as follows by his daughter, Lydia Tombow Groff, in her petition to the Orphans Court of Lancaster County in September l858 (Miscellaneous Records, pp. l78-9): "Tract No. 1 containing about l4 acres (more or less) on which are erected a two storey frame dwelling house, a frame barn, and other improvements, also a well of good water and an orchard bounded on the north by the Philadelphia Columbia Railroad, on the south by the old Philadelphia Road ...."

"Tract No. 2 containing one acre (more or less) on which are erected a one and one half storey Dwelling House (frame), stable, and good well of water and bounded on the north by Tract No. 1 and on the South by the old Philadelphia Road...."

Both the Old Philadelphia Road and the railroad tracks remain to this day defining the boundaries of the ancestral land.

An l847 Tax record (which spells the name Tombo) indicates that William, Sr., is in possession of Tract No. 1, which is valued at $l450 and his son, William, Jr., is in possession of Tract No. 2, valued at $250. William, Sr., owns two horses, valued at $40, l cattle valued at $l5. His total state taxes for that year were $4.85 and his county taxes were $2.32. William, Sr., is listed as a trader by occupation. He is also noted as a trader in the l84l purchase of property mentioned above.

In a letter to this writer, dated l5 January l989, the President of the Lancaster County Historical Society, John Ward Wilson Loose, states of William Tombos:

"Your ancestor was sufficiently prominent that the village near his home was called Tombowtown! Today it is known as Mount Rock... and even at that very few persons know the area as anything but Smoketown!"

It is not until l830 that William Tombos appears in the Federal Census. The l8l0 Census records only heads of households and William was not married until 1811. The l820 Census for Lancaster County has been lost or destroyed.

The following entry is found in the l830 Federal Census for Lampeter Township, Lancaster County, Pennsylvania:

Tamboo, William

Male l (l0-l5 years) Male l (l5-20 years) Male l (40-50 years) Female l (under 5 years) Female 2 (5-l0 years) Female 1 (l0-l5 years) Female l (30-40 years)

The following entry is found in the l840 Federal Census, Lampeter Township, Lancaster County, Pennsylvania (p. 386, dwelling #4):

Tombo, William, Senior:

Male l (0-5 years) Male l (50-60 years) Female l (l0-l5 years) Female l (l5-20 years) Female l (20-30 years) Female l (40-50 years)

The following entry for William Tombos in the l850 Census is found under the name Dombo. The Census was taken 28 August l850 for this dwelling in E. Lampeter (p. 202, dwelling #ll6):

Dombo, William, 6l years, farmer, real estate valued at $2,500. Dombo, Elizabeth, 54 years, born in Pennsylvania Dombo, Samuel, l4 (?) years, born in Pennsylvania, attends school Dombo, Mary, 8 years, born in Pennsylvania, attends school Wilson, Robert, 32 years, laborer, born in Pennsylvania Wilson, Catherine, 25 years, born in Pennsylvania

Samuel and Mary are William Tombow, Jr.'s oldest children. Samuel is actually l0 years old at this time and is also recorded on September l0, l850 in Dwelling 34l, E. Lampeter, with John Weaver, age 3l, farmer. Samuel is listed as Tombo in this entry (p. 206).

Catherine Wilson is Catherine Tombow Wilson, daughter of William Tombos and his wife, Mary. Robert Wilson is Catherine's husband.

Elizabeth, listed above, is the second wife of William Tombos, Elizabeth Foos.

William Tombow, Jr., is listed as living in dwelling #ll5, probably Tract No. 2 mentioned in the Orphans Court petition cited above. Lydia Tombow Groff, a daughter of William Tombos, is listed with her husband Benjamin Groff and their family in dwelling #ll4. Thus a family compound had built up around the Family Patriarch which may have been the reason for calling the area Tombowtown.

It is certainly tempting to consider William Tombos as a kindly Family Patriarch. On 26 March l845 he sold a parcel of his land to his daughter, Lydia Tombow Groff and her husband, Benjamin N. Groff. (Deeds, Q-10-397) On this same date, he also sold a parcel to his son, William Tombow, Jr., and his wife (Deeds , G-7-8l). In this latter Deed, William Tombos, Sr., notes his intent to sell an adjoining parcel of land to Amos N. Bowers, his daughter Sarah Tombow's first husband.

And, as noted in the l850 Census, William Tombos, now in his 60's, not only has the above two children and their families living next to him, but he also has his youngest daughter, Catherine Tombow and her husband, Robert Wilson, living with him, as well as his 10 year old grandson, Samuel Tombo (the writer's great-grandfather) and his 8 year old granddaugther, Mary Tombo, both children of his son, William Tombow, Jr.

Truly this was not only Tombowtown, but a town of Tombows, living in E. Lampeter on l5 acres of land in l850.

In the l850 Census there were 34l houses, 360 families and l,980 people in East Lampeter Township. William Tombos is not mentioned in the l860 Census, as he died two years prior to the Census.

According to the Probate Records to settle William Tombos' estate, found in the Miscellaneous Records of the Lancaster County Orphans Court, William Tombos and his wife, Mary, had six children, named in this order, which is presumed to be the birth order, as is the custom in legal records of this nature: John Tombow, William (H.) Tombow, Jr., Mary Ann Tombow, Sarah Tombow, Lydia Tombow, and Catherine Tombow. (Misc. Records, Orphans Court, September l858, pp. l78-9)

Mary Herzkey Tombos died 24 April l849, aged 55 years, 6 months, and 3 days old, according to the Smith Family Bible. She is buried in Mellinger's Mennonite Cemetery, l9l8 Lincoln Highway, E. Lancaster, Pennsylvania, Row 5. Her tombstone still survives with a lengthy inscription, but it is not known whether it is still legible.

She was unable to write as she made only her mark on Deeds to their property.

William Tombos remarried on 4 April l850 to Elizabeth Foos in St. Mary's Catholic Church in the City of Lancaster. Elizabeth had been twice widowed before she married William Tombos and was to outlive him, dying in January, l869 (Deeds, T-9-3l0).

The entry in St. Mary's records unfortunately gives no parentage for the parties:

"Married on 4 April l850 Mrs. Elizabeth Faust to William Tambo, according to the rites of the Catholic Church in the presence of Ann Kienan and Benjamin Groff. Sacerdotus (Priest) Kienan."

Ann Kienan was the priest's sister and housekeeper. Benjamin Groff was William's son-in-law, married to his daughter Lydia Tombow.

There were no children of this second marriage, Elizabeth being beyond the child-bearing years. A review of her Will mentions no children of this marriage.

The couple signed a marriage settlement, or pre-nuptial agreement, on the same date as their marriage which is recorded in the Lancaster County Court House (Deeds, N-7-498), but a copy of this record is not available to the writer at this time.

William Tombos died l0 April l858, age 7l years, according to the Smith Family Bible. His grave is in Row 5, Mellinger's Cemetery, next to his first wife, Mary. His tombstone also has a lengthy inscription, but it is not known whether it is legible.

The Will of Elizabeth, William Tombos' second wife, is recorded under the name of Elizabeth Tombo. The settlement of her estate is recorded in Deeds Z-9-393. Her Will, with several codicils, indicates that she was married to Benjamin Wallace and Jacob Fufs who pre-deceased her.

There were children from both marriages mentioned in her Will. The settling of Elizabeth's estate is also referenced in Deeds, U-9-496.

Elizabeth was a devout Catholic who requested that she be buried in St. Mary's Cemetery with an iron fence around her grave. A visit to this Cemetery in l989 by the writer failed to find the grave. Further search may be required to find the grave site through the Sexton's records. Papers to probate her estate were filed on 25 January l869.

The l860 Federal Census for Lancaster County records Elizabeth Tamboo, age 73 as living with her son-in-law, John Mendler, victualer, and her daughter, Elizabeth, in the City of Lancaster (p. 953, dwelling l30).

William Tombos' estate took many years to settle. He died without a Will and the marriage setlement, or pre-nuptial agreement, he signed 4 April l850 (Deeds, N-7-498) the day he married his second wife Elizabeth Foos, allowed his widow the use of the property until her death in January, l869.

Further complications arose with the death of William Tombos's son, John Tombow, in l863, prior to the death of William's widow. John's sons then became heirs to their grandfather William's estate.

While William, Sr., died in l858, it is not until June of l880 that the last of John Tombow's sons, Daniel Webster Tombow, came of age. On 9 June and 22 June l880, Daniel signed the last of the Patriarch's land away to Daniel Buckwalter (Deeds, M-ll-424) and to Catherine Herr (Deeds, M-ll-465).

The gradual transfer of the ancestral homestead to others outside the family is also recorded in Lancaster County Deeds X-8-l7l, X-8-l72, A-9-l42, G-l0-339, T-9-3l0, X-l0-440, and X-l0-441. These Deeds need to be examined for further information about the Family. Nineteenth Century Deeds were filled not only with legalistic descriptions of the property sold, but extraneous and interesting information about the people involved in the sale.


























 
Tombos, William (I03727)
 
25 The Descendants of John Tombow and Sarah Smith

The descendants of John Tombow and Sarah Smith have been traced by Dorothy Tombow Boulware, RR2, Box311-B, Argyle TX 76226 in her book: "Tambos Tombo Tombow"

What follows comes from Patrick L. Tombeau's research on this branch of the family.

The founding parents of the Family, William Tombos, Sr., and Mary Ann Herzkey, as noted previously, had six children, in the following birth order: John Tombow, William (H.) Tombow, Jr., Mary Ann Tombow, Sarah Tombow, Lydia Tombow, and Catherine Tombow. (Miscellaneous Records, Orphans Court, Lancaster County, PA, September 1858, pp. 178-9.)

This chapter in the Family History discusses the first Tombow born in America and his descendants. Ongoing research on this branch of the Family is currently being done by the writer, who may be addressed at 1462 Middlewood Dr., Saline, MI, 48176; by Dorothy Tombow Boulware whose address is Rt. 2, Box 33l-B, Argyle, Texas 76226; by Betty A. Edwards of 1729 Dexter Rd., N.E., Massillon, Ohio 44646; and by Shirley Hern, 5213 Gatewood Lane, Anaheim, California 92807.

John Tombow, the first child of William and Mary Tombos, was born in Lancaster County, Pennsylvania. His name, according to the German and Dutch customs of the time, is that of his maternal grandfather, John Herzkey. His birth year, based on various discrepant records, has been estimated to lie between 1808 and 1813.

However, his parents were married on 17 January 1811 and his next sibling. William, Jr., was born in 1813, making 18ll or 1812 the most likely years of birth. According to E. Greenville Cemetery Records, Tuscarawas Township, Stark County, Ohio, John died on 30 August 1863, aged 55 years, 11 months, and 10 days, making his birth date September 20, 1808, two years and four months before his parents were married.

Based upon the fact that John's parents were married in January, 1811, and John's birthday is 20 September, it is most likely that John was an "eight month baby", born 20 September 1811, and that he died at the age of 52 years, 11 months, and 10 days, three years younger than the records at death indicate. This seems more reasonable than the alternative that John's parents lived in a "state of sin" with their infant son, in a religious Mennonite Community, for over two years before getting married.

John's childhood was spent in E. Lampeter Township, Lancaster County, Pennsylvania, on the property described in the previous chapter on the Family Origins.

John Tombow married Sarah Smith in Lancaster County, Pennsylvania, on 2 August 1835, being at that time about 24 years of age. His wife Sarah was born 10 July 1814 according to the E. Greenville Cemetery Records. Her parentage has not been established, but there is some speculation that she may be a sister of Thomas Smith who married another Tombow, Mary Ann Tombow, John's sister. No evidence or oral tradition has been found to support this speculation. Based on the names given to Sarah Smith Tombow's first four children, her parents were most likely Nathaniel and Margaret Smith since those are the names given to her second born son and daughter. Her first born son and daughter were named William and Mary Ann, which are the names of her husband's parents. Four years after their marriage, John Tombow purchased land in Martic Township, Lancaster County, Pennsylvania. The purchase of this land was made on l April 1839 from Job Reynolds and wife for $500 (Deeds, N-8-544). The particulars of this Deed have not been examined by this writer.

John Tombow appears as a head of household for the first time in 1840. As only one male between the ages of 15-20 is mentioned in his father's household in the 1830 Census, John, as the oldest son, at that time 19 years old, most likely had hired out as a farm hand.

John Tombow and his family are recorded in the 1840 Federal Census for Lancaster County in Martic Township as follows:

John Tombo

Male l (20-40 years)
Female 2 (0-5 years)
Female l (15-20 years)
Female l (20-30 Years)

This Census accounts for John, his wife Sarah, their two daughters, Mary Ann and Margaret Tombow. The female, age 15-20 years, may have been one of John's sisters who came to live with them to help with housekeeping, a frequent practice in those years. The entry for William Tombow, Sr., in this particular Census year shows only three of his four daughters living with him.

The 1850 Federal Census for Martic Township records the following entry (p. 105, dwelling #10, 17 August 1850):

John Tombo, age 4l, carpenter, property value assessed at $800, born in Lancaster Co. Sarah Tombow, age 39, born in Lancaster County Margaret Tombow, age 11, born in Lancaster County, attends school William Tombow, age 9, born in Lancaster County, attends school Nathaniel Tombow, age 7, born in Lancaster County, attends school John Tombow, age 5, born in Lancaster County, attends school Henry Tombow, age 3, born in Lancaster County

Mary Ann Tombo, age 16, is listed with a neighbor, William Coin, carpenter, his wife, Sarah, and their two young children, Daniel and Mary, ages 5 and 3. (1850 Census, Martic Township, p. 105, dwelling #3, 16 August 1850.)

There were 527 houses in Martic Township in 1850.

As John Tombow moved to Wayne County and then Stark County, Ohio, in the late 1850's, there is no entry for him in the 1860 Census of Lancaster County, Pennsylvania. However, his entry for 1860 in the Stark County, Ohio Federal Census has been located at this writing by Mrs. Shirley Hern of Anaheim, CA. His entry can be found in the 1860 Federal Census, Stark Co., Tuscararas Twp., recorded 22 August 1860, pg. 250.

John moved with his Family to Ohio around the years 1856 or 1857, as evidenced by Deeds in Lancaster and Stark Counties. John sold his Martic Township property in Lancaster County on 14 March 1857 for $500 to Thomas Smith of W. Lampeter Township, his sister Mary Ann Tombow's husband, and possible brother of John's wife, Sarah Smith. (Deeds, N-8-545)

(Thomas Smith may have defaulted on his payments to John on this property as a letter from Benjamin and Lydia Tombow Groff, accompanying this Family History, indicates that Thomas Smith had not done right by John in some matter. The text of this letter will be found in the chapter on the descendants of Benjamin and Lydia Tombow Groff.)

John had purchased 2 acres from Wendel Keller in Stark County, Ohio, in section 7, Twp. 12, Range 10, of that County two months before on 4 January 1857 (Stark Co,., Ohio, Deeds, Book 67, p. 288).

John Tombow died 30 August 1863, according to the Cemetery Records in E. Greenville, Ohio, probably at the age of 52 years, 11 months, and 10 days, from considerations mentioned earlier in this chapter. Sarah Smith Tombow died 30 April 1892 at the age of 77 years, 9 months, and 20 days, according to the E. Greenville Cemetery Records. A marker still stands commemorating their graves.

John and Sarah Smith Tombow's home still stands in E. Greenville, Ohio.

John Tombow and Sarah Smith had nine children: Mary Ann Tombow, Margaret Tombow, William Tombow, Nathaniel Smith Tombow, John Tombow, Henry Clay Tombow, Shetzer Tombow, Adam Grant Tombow, and Daniel Webster Tombow.

With sons named Henry Clay Tombow and Daniel Webster Tombow, John Tombow could certainly be characterized as an ardent patriot with conservative politics. Both Clay and Webster were eloquent orators for conservative issues. Such names suggest that John Tombow had a lively interest in the political debates and issues of his day.

John's son Adam Grant Tombow was born in 1853, several years before Ulysses S. Grant became a general in the Civil War and President of the U.S., so John's inspiration for his son Adam's middle name is not apparent.
 
Tombow, John (I07256)
 
26 Ann Tombow

II-8: Ann Tombow was the eighth of the nine children of William Tombow, Jr., and Elizabeth Rohrer of E. Lampeter Township, Lancaster County, PA. Her paternal grandparents were William Tombos, an immigrant from the Netherlands, and Mary Herzkey who was of German descent.

She is mentioned as the daughter of William Tombow, Jr., in several records: in her younger brother William's birth entry recorded in the Lancaster County 1852-55 Register of Births, Marriages, and Deaths; in the Letter of Administration for her father's estate in Whiteside County, IL, Circuit Court records; in the 1904 legal proceedings brought against the heirs of William Tombow in Whiteside County Circuit Court by David Kauffman in order to get clear title to William's land; and finally in the deposition by her sister, Lydia Tombow Fluck in the Civil War Pension Papers of their brother, Jacob Tombow AKA Jacob MIller.

She is not mentioned in the 1850 Federal Census of Lancaster County, PA, in her parent's entry taken on 28 August 1850, suggesting that she was born after this date.

Ann's mother died in early 1853, as William Tombow, Jr., sold his land in Lancaster County, E.Lampeter, without his wife's name on the Deed of Conveyance. Ann would have been only about 2 years old at that time. In about 1856 Ann's father, William Tombow, Jr., moved with his new wife, Fanny, to Whiteside County, IL.

Ann's father, William, was not close to his children and he consistently farmed his children out to co-religionists in the Mennonite faith. In the 1860 Federal Census of Whiteside County, IL, we see her in the entry of a household other than her father's like all of her brothers and sisters.(Whiteside County, IL, 1860 Federal Census, Jordan Township, p. 112)

Isaac B (?), age 58, farmer, real estate: $8,750; personal: $1,500, born in PA. Frances, age 60, born in PA George Delp, age 22, farm laborer, real estate: $200, born in PA Ann Tornbow, age 9, born in PA.

Like all of her brothers and sister, her last name was new to the area and the census taker in nearly illegible writing twists her name to "Tornbow". Her age in the above entry would suggest a birth date in 1851.

Little else is known about Ann. She is mentioned in the Letter of Administration filed in Whiteside Circuit Court after her father's death on 18 April 1865, so she is apparently still living on this date. She is not found in the Illinois State Census for Whiteside County, but she could be in neighboring Lee county or another county. Nor is she mentioned in the 1870 Federal Census for Whiteside County.

We do know she died before 1904 as she is mentioned as deceased by that date having no husband or children, according to the Whiteside County Circuit Court records in the matter of David Kauffman against the heirs of William Tombow, Jr., to obtain clear title to William's land and home in Sterling (IL).

Her burial site is unknown. If she died around the time of her father's death she may be buried in Science Ridge Cemetery in Sterling in an unmarked grave.

Nothing further known about Ann Tombow except that her sister refers to her as "Annie" in her deposition in their brother Jacob Tombow's Civil War Pension papers.

This line of the Tombow Family is extinct.

Compiled and written by:

Patrick L. Tombeau 9 May 1993
 
Tombow, Ann (I04332)
 
27 Jacob Tombow AKA Jacob Miller

II-7: Jacob Tombow was the seventh child of the nine children of William Tombow, Jr. and Elizabeth Rohrer of E. Lampeter Township, Lancaster Co., PA. He was born in Strasburg, PA, on 29 July 1849, according to his Civil War Pension Papers. His paternal grandparents were William Tombos, a Dutch immigrant and first of the name in this country, and Mary Herzkey, born in America of German descent.

ix lines of evidence sustain that he was the son of William Tombow, Jr. He is mentioned as one of the above couple's children in the 1852-55 Lancaster County Register of Births, Marriages, and Deaths in his young- er brother William's birth entry. He is mentioned as an heir to William Tombow, Jr., in the Letter of Administration at the time of William's death. He is mentioned as an heir in the 1904 legal proceedings by David Kauffman against the heirs of William Tombow, Jr., to obtain clear title to the latter's Sterling property. His father is also mentioned in his Pension Papers. Jacob also brought suit against his father's widow, Fanny, to obtain the return of his bounty, and Jacob is also mentioned in his father's Census entry in Lancaster County, PA, in 1850.

The first glimpse of Jacob is in the 1850 Federal Census of Lancaster County, PA, taken 28 August 1850, E. Lampeter Township, dwelling 115. The family name is corrupted to "Dombo" by the census taker.

Dombo, William, 36 years old, laborer, born in PA, real estate: $700. Elizabeth, 32 years old, born in PA Catherine, 5 years old, born in PA John, 2 years old, born in PA Jacob, 1 year old, born in PA

In 1853, when Jacob was 3-4 years old, his mother, Elizabeth Rohrer, died. His father, William, married shortly thereafter to Jacob's stepmother, Fanny. In the spring of 1853 William put his land up for sale, and, according to Jacob's pension papers, set out for what was then called "out West", the city of Sterling in Whiteside County, IL, in 1856.

Jacob's father was not close to his children. He generally farmed them out to various Mennonite families, as the Censuses in Lancaster and Whiteside Counties attest.

Lydia Tombow Fluck, a sister of Jacob, states in her affidavit on behalf of his Civil War Pension:

"When Jacob's father moved to Illinois, Jacob was put out to live with strangers. From time to time Jacob would run away and get another place to live. All of William Tombow's children moved about from place to place around and in Sterling, Ill. Not any of the children lived with their father."

Jacob had a particularly difficult relationship with his father according to testimony heard in the suit Jacob brought against his father's widow, Fanny, to get his Civil War Bounty back which he had loaned to his father. One witness, Alexander Zimmer, states:

"He (Jacob) was in my employ for about a month before he enlisted and about this time his Father told me that I must pay Jacob Tombow his wages, that he would have nothing more to do with him, that he must look after himself hereafter."

At that time, Jacob had just turned 15 years old.

The 1860 Federal Census for Whiteside County, IL, reports Jacob in a household other than his father's, as were all of William Tombow's children in that census, proving the truth of Lydia's statements about her father.

Jacob is living with the Abram B. Meyers family in New Jordan, IL, p. 113.

Abram B. Meyers, age 51, farmer, $2190 real estate, $800 personal; born in PA. Elizabeth, age 50, born in PA Francis, age 29, farmer, born in PA Elizabeth, age 19, born in PA Mary, age 2, born in IL Abram, age 10/12, born in IL Jacob Tornbow, age 12, born in PA

As with his brothers and sisters, the family name, new to the area, was contorted in the nearly illegible writing of the census taker into "Tornbow".

On 8 October 1864, at the age of 15 years, 2 months, and 9 days, Jacob joined his older brothers, Samuel and John Tombow, and his three first cousins, Nathaniel, William and John Tombow, of Ohio, and enlisted as the sixth Tombow to enter the Civil War.

He enlisted at Dixon, IL. for a period of one year. He was unable to write his name. He listed his occupation as that of a farmer and that he was 18 years old. He listed his address as Sterling, Whiteside County, IL. He is described as having hazel eyes, brown hair, and dark complex- ion, and was five feet three inches tall. The average height at that time for a grown man was five feet seven inches. It is worth noting that Jacob grew another two and one half inches during his adolescence, as his affidavit of 22 January 1920 indicates that he was 5 feet five and one half inches tall and weighed 153 pounds. At that time he noted that the tip of the forefinger on his right hand is "off at the end of the nail". His hair, at that age (71) had turned grey.

He was assigned to Co.A of the 34th Regiment of Illinois Volunteer Infantry where he remained as a private until he was discharged at War's end in 12 July 1865.

Other than treatment for remittent fever between 11 January and 28 February 1865, his military records indicate he had no medical illnesses or injuries sustained during the War.

Remittent, or relapsing, fever, according to Blakiston's Medical Dictionary, is a group of diseases caused by spirochete bacteria transmitted to man by lice or ticks, characterized by acute onset, chills, fever, pain to the back and legs, enlarged spleen, delirium and sometimes convulsions.

Certainly the cause of this disease reflects upon the poor hygienic conditions in which the Civil War soldiers served.

He served honorably, there being no record of desertion, AWOL, or court martial in his file.

The Illinois Adjutant General's Report on the history of the 34th Infantry indicates the movements of this regiment at about the time Jacob joined on 8 October 1864:

"September 29, left Atlanta with Second Division. Fourteenth Army Corps for the purpose of driving Forrest from Tennessee; pursued him to Florence, Alabama, driving him across the Tennessee River, after which the Regiment rejoined Sherman's Army south of Chattanooga in Northern Alabama. Returned with the Army to Atlanta and went with Sherman to the sea, and on the Campaign through the Carolinas. In a light engagement at Averysboro, N.C., on March 16,1865, had three men killed and five wounded.

"March 19, 1865, took part in the battle of Bentonville, N.C., in which the Regiment was attacked from both the front and rear but stubbornly held its ground and repulsed the enemy. Loss eight killed and twenty two wounded.

"After lying at Goldsboro, N.C., until April 10, left for Raleigh, N.C., reaching there on the 13th and on the 14th started with the Fourteenth Army Corp for Cape Fear River to intercept General Jos. E. Johnston's retreat. On the 15th had one man killed and one wounded by rebel cavalry.

"After the surrender of Johnston, the Regiment went with Sherman's ARMY to Washington, D.C., and took part in the grand review May 24, 1865.

"Left Washington June 12 and arrived at Louisville, Ky., June 18, where the regiment was mustered out on July 12, and was discharged and paid at Chicago, Ill., on July 17, 1865.

Thus Jacob was involved in Sherman's March to the Sea, one of the most spectacular scenes in the movie "Gone With The Wind".

We know that Jacob returned with at least one spoil of the War: a cameo brooch, which he gave to his sister Elizabeth Tombow Groff. It has passe down in that branch of the family to this day and is in the possession of Virginia Jones Stawarz of Clinton, IA, a great grand-daughter of Elizabeth Tombow Groff. She writes to me in a letter, dated 17 August 1990:

"The cameo was, according to the story told by my aunt and mother, found by one of great-grandmother's brothers as he returned home from the Civil War. He stopped to rest under a large tree during the heat of the day, and while he was sitting there, he spotted a small white package which contained the cameo. He carried it home and gave it to his sister.

"The initials L M and the numbers 42 are scratched on the back of the stone- visible under light, but not deep enough to photograph. The letters are in a rather florid script."

Attempts to photograph this tiny cameo for this history have only led to blurred images.

But with the return of Jacob Tombow to Sterling in July of 1865 a curious Court Room Drama begins to unfold. His father, William Tombow, Jr., had died of a lingering illness three months before on April 18th. Not, however, without taking care of his soon to be widowed second wife, Fanny.

William had converted Jacob's $480 bounty which Jacob had loaned him in October, 1864, into paying off the house at 1307 Third St. in Sterling while on his death bed.

Here is the sworn testimony of Benjamin G. Weaver in the ensuing Court case brought by Jacob against his father's widow by his next of friend, Aaron Fluck, his sister Lydia's husband, because Jacob was still a minor.

"My name is Benjamin G. Weaver, am 33 years old, reside in Sterling Township, Whiteside County, IL, and by occupation a farmer.

"I was acquainted with William Tombow of said Whiteside County in his life time. I am acquainted with Jacob Tombow, the above named complainant.

"William Tombow requested me to go to Dixon at the time Jacob Tombow enlisted into the U.S. Military Service and get his Bounty Money of him and let him have it and he would pay him six per cent interest for the use of it. I went to Dixon and received Four Hundred and Eighty Dollars ($480) in cash and his certificate of enlistment and gave the money and certificate to William Tombow. This was the 11th day of October, A.D., 1864. The certificate of enlistment which I received from Jacob Tombow and gave to his Father, William Tombow, called for Two Hundred Dollars County Order."

An unusually generous act by Jacob toward his father considering that a month before he entered military service, he had been disowned by his father, according to the testimony of Alexander Zimmer quoted previously.

The Court sided with Jacob, but Jacob was forced again to go to Court because of the failure of his step-mother and her attorney to pay him in a timely manner.

The further details of this matter may be found in the chapter of this history on William Tombow, Jr.

Jacob continued to lead a troubled life. His marriage to Jenny Zimmer, perhaps a relative of Alexander Zimmer above, failed. He married her in September, 1869, and was divorced in Whiteside County, IL on 1 July 1878, according to his pension papers.

This marriage appears to have been one more in name than in fact. Married in September, 1869, he appears not to be living with his wife in the 1870 Federal Census for Whiteside County (entry 287/290, Mt. Pleasant):

Jacob Tornbow, age 23, farm laborer. He is apparently living in a boarding house or hotel in this entry.

The 1875-76 City Directory for Sterling, IL, notes he is a teamster, residing on the SE corner of 3rd and Fulton. No mention of a wife in this entry.

The 1877-78 City Directory for Sterling notes he is a laborer residing on the north side of Prophetstown Rd., near McCune, Rock Falls. There is no indication of a wife.

The 1870's were also a period of criminal trials and convictions for Jacob Tombow, which probably explains why he eventually changed his name to Jacob Miller to escape his past.

On 8 June 1870 he was accused and convicted of stealing the horse and halter for it of Pharas Landis. The horse was valued at $100, the halter at $2.00. He was sentenced to three years in the Penitentiary on a felony conviction. (Whiteside County Circuit Court, Docket F, p. 224)

Barely out of the Penitentiary, on 12 June 1874 he was accused of selling liquor to a minor, Samuel Benner, as the owner of a dram shop. (Whiteside County Circuit Court, Box 575)

On 28 June 1879 he is charged with selling liquor without a license. in quantities less than a gallon. (Docket 1, p. 116, File 575).

His divorce from Jennie Zimmer is recorded in Whiteside County Circuit Court Records (Docket I, p. 33, File #449) dated 1 July 1878.

Jacob's Pension Papers indicate that there were no children of this marriage.

His Civil War Pension records indicate that he spent about 10 years in Whiteside County before taking up residence in Mattoon, IL, in Cole County. However, the above court dockets indicate that the time was at least 15 years.

On 22 February 1888 in Mattoon, IL, Jacob Tombow, now styling himself Jacob Miller married Fanny Nora Baker, born 31 March 1861 in Dayton, Ohio, the daughter of Daniel Baker and Mary Neff. (Pension Papers, Obituary in Mattoon Journal, 6 March 1936, and her death certificate)

On 27 December 1888 they purchased their home on 1009 Champaign St., where they lived until their deaths. Jacob Tombow AKA Jacob Miller died 22 June 1920 in St. Mary's Hospital, Decatur, of sepsis from cystitis caused by an operation on the bladder for a tumor. He had worked a s a brakeman for the Big Four Railroads in Mattoon and was retired at the time of his death at 70. Fanny Nora Baker died 16 years later on 5 March 1936 of cancer of the spleen.

Of this union there were no children. Fanny's will indicates that she left her estate to her nephews, nieces, and surviving brothers.

Jacob Miller AKA Jacob Tombow/Tambo and his wife Nora Baker Miller are buried in Dodge Grove Cemetery in Mattoon, IL. Their graves are marked with a stone bearing the name of Miller. (Section 6, Division D, Lot 18) Fanny's mother appears to be buried in the grave just to the left of Jacob and Nora's graves. (Research in Mattoon on this line was done by Marylea Souers Degler, Route 1, Box 20, Mattoon, IL, 61938 in 1989.)

In a letter dated 28 June 1989, Mrs. Degler notes that the Jacob Miller home at 1009 Champaign was still standing "just one street north of the railroad.... It has been recovered with vinyl and is in rather good condition."

After a bad beginning, Jacob appeared to end his life productively and unobtrusively. But the rumors of his horse stealing reverberates down to the present day. Descendants of his Uncle John Tombow in Ohio talk to this day about the Tombow who changed his name because he was a horse thief. This writer's father often said that it did not pay to look into one's family because we might find we were related to horse thieves. The writer took this oft-repeated comment by his father as a joke. It appears that even in Olyphant, PA, where my father was raised during his childhood, Jacob's ways had come down also as a rumor in the family without a name attached.

While Jacob could not spell his name at the time of his enlistment, when he applied for his pension, he was able to write his name in cursive. He spelled it "Tambo", unlike his brothers and sisters who spelled it either Tombow or Tombo. The "Tambo" spelling was also adopted by his nephew, William Tambo, living nearly a thousand miles to the east in Olyphant, PA, near Scranton. The remnants of this alternate spelling from William's line survive as "Tambeau", an alteration, noted else- where, started by this writer's father. In her book, Tambos Tombo Tombow, Dorothy Tombow Boulware believes the original Dutch Spelling of the name was Tambos, and that the final "s" got dropped by all subsequent bearers of the name, with the majority spelling it also as "Tombow". The reasons for these alterations in the name will probably require analysis by a Dutch-German linguist. No tradition has passed down in the family as to why the changes in the spelling of the name occurred.

As obituaries, Jacob's pension papers, and the provisions of his wife Nora's will indicate that there were no children of this union, this line of the Tombow Family is extinct.

Compiled by:

Patrick L. Tombeau 2 May 1993 
Tombow\Miller, Jacob (I04331)
 
28 The Descendants of Catherine Tombow and John Delp, Sr.

II-4: Catherine Tombow is the fourth of the nine children of William Tombow, Jr., and Elizabeth Rohrer of Lancaster County, E. Lampeter, PA She was the granddaughter of the of the founding couple, William Tombos, a Dutch immigrant, and Mary Ann Herzkey, of German descent.

She was probably named after her paternal aunt, Catherine Tombow Wilson.

The evidence that she is the daughter of William Tombow, Jr., and Elizabeth Rohrer is found in three separate records: in the 1852-55 Lancaster County (PA) Register of Births, Deaths, and Marriages on the occasion of her younger brother William's birth in 1852. Secondly, she is mentioned as an heir to her father's estate in the 1865 Court proceedings in the Whiteside County (IL) Circuit Court to settle his estate (Letters of Administration). The third mention occurs in the papers filed by David F. Kauffman in Whiteside County Circuit Court on 2 March 1904 against the heirs of William Tombow, Jr., to obtain clear title to William's property in Sterling (IL). The details of this case may be found in the Family History in the section narrating the events in the life of William Tombow, Jr.

At that time, Catherine was deceased so that her own children had become heirs to William's estate.

The first sight of Catherine Tombow is found in the 1850 Federal Census of Lancaster County, Pennsylvania. The entry was recorded 28 August 1850 for dwelling #115 of E. Lampeter Township, PA. The family name is misspelled Dombo, a Germanic corruption of Tombo.

Dombo, William, 36 years old, laborer, born in PA, real estate value: $700. Dombo, Elizabeth, 32 years old, born in PA. Dombo, Catherine, 5 years old, born in PA. Dombo, John, 2 years old, born in PA Dombo, Jacob, 1 year old, born in Pennsylvania.

This entry would suggest that Catherine was born in 1845.

Catherine's older brother, Samuel, and older sister, Mary, are listed in their grandfather's home. Another sister, Elizabeth, is found in yet another household in Manheim Township, Lancaster County. Her younger sister Lydia has not yet been locate in this census. Catherine's father did not appear close to his children and they are often found in the Federal Censuses in the homes of strangers.

After the death of Catherine's mother, Elizabeth Rohrer, in early 1853, when Catherine was only 8 years old, her father, William Tombow, Jr., sold his property and settled in Whiteside County, IL, in the city of Sterling in 1856, according to Lydia Tombow Fluck, William's daughter.

It is not known whether she was one of the chidren he took with him or left behind in Lancaster. However, she does appear in the 1860 Federal Census for Whiteside Count, IL. Like all of her other brothers and sisters, she is found in the home of an apparent acquaintance of her father. The handwriting in this census is bad and her name in this entry has been contorted to "Cass Tornbow" (Sterling Township, p.406, entry 3073/2856).

Benjamin Weaver, age 29, male, farmer, $1100 real estate, born in PA. Barbara " age 27, female, born in PA. Martha A. " age 3, female, born in IL Mary E. " age 1, female born in IL Andrew Hawes 9?), age 19, male, farm laborer, born in PA. Cass Tornbow age 16, fenale, domestic, born in PA.

Catherine was probably baby sitter and servant to the the family with which she lives.

On 28 February 1865, approximately 20 years old, Catherine marries John Delp in Whiteside County, IL (Lic. No. 1243)

The ancestry of John Delp will be found in Leonard Delp's Delps Galore. In this work the author states John Delp's birth date is 27 March 1838, but does not state his source for that date.

The Civil War records at the National Archives in Washington, D.C., do not contain a record of his service in the Civil War. Family tradition in this branch of the family states that he and his wife Catherine were devout members of the Reformed Mennonite Church. Beliefs of the Menonite Church prevent members from going to war. This probably explains the lack of a record as John would have been a conscientious objector.

His granddaughter, Judy Delp of Arco, MN, states that because of his Mennonite beliefs john did not like pictures taken.

The young couple are recorded in the Illinois State Census for 1865. The entry was found in Jordan Township, Whiteside County:

John Delp: 1 male (20-30); 1 female (20-30); no children are listed.

Another entry is found for the couple in the 1870 Federal Census for Whiteside County, Jordan Township, entry 11/11:

John Delp, age 32, born in PA, estate of $2,000, personal property of $650, farm laborer. Cassiah (Catherine), age 25, born in PA Thomas (for Pharas Thomas), 3 years, born in IL Elizabeth, age 2, born in IL

John and Catherine Tombow Delp are found again in Jordan Towship in the 1880 Federal Census for Whiteside County, entry 105/112:

Delp, John, age 41, farmer, born in PA as were both parents Catherine, age 36, wife, born in Pa as were both parents Pharas, age 12, son, farm laborer, born in IL. Elizabeth, age 11, daughter, born in IL. Lydia, age 10, daughter, born in IL. Theodore, age 9, son, born in IL. Mary, age 7, daughter, born in IL. Emma, age 2, daughter, born In IL. Franklin, age 1, son, born in IL.

Leonard Delp, in Delps Galore states that Franklin in this entry was born in 1879 (1880 Census) and died in September, 1881 (County Deaths).

The couple's last four children, Lucetta ("Lettie"), Kate, Amanda, and John, Jr., are not yet born as of this census.

Somewhere between 1880 and 1890 John and Catherine Tombow Delp apparently moved with their large family from Jordan Township in Whiteside County, IL., to neighboring Lee County, south of Dixon. John does not appear on the 1890 tax lists for Whiteside County and a narrative supplied to this writer by the descendants of John and Catherine's daughter, Loucetta ("Lettie"), indicates that Loucetta, born in 1881, attended rural schools south of Dixon.

According to Margaret Burmeister, a daughter-in-law of Emma Delp Burmeister, Catherine Tombow died at the age of 50, making the year of death about 1895. The Henry Grobe branch of the Delp family states the year is 1894.

Mrs. Margaret Burmeister recalls the situation at the time of Catherine Tombow Delp's death in a note to this writer:

"Emma Delp Burmeister's mother (Catherine Tombow) died at fifty and Emma had to take over everything, cooking, baking and sewing. She made a vest for (her) father. She carried her brother John to school to get him to go. Her older sisters would help, but wouldn't take over."

Emma Would have been 16 to 17 years old at the time of her mother's death.

John Delp died in 1910, according to the Henry Grobe branch of the Delp Family. Leonard Delp, in Delps Galore, states that John's death occurred 21 October 1912. He does not state his source for this date.

John Delp was alive during the summer of 1910 as he is found in his son Theodore's household in Sterling, age 71, (Ward 1, entry 352/353, 1910 Federal Census, Whiteside County, IL).

John Delp and Catherine Tombow had the following children: Pharas Delp, Elizabeth Delp, Lydia Delp, Theodore Delp, Mary Delp, Emma Delp, Franklin Delp, Lucetta Delp, Amanda Delp, Kate Delp, and John Delp, according to Leonard Delp in Delps Galore. The first seven have been confirmed by the 1870 and 1880 Federal Censuses and the last four by personal knowledge of the Delp Family descendants in Dixon, IL. Four other children, for a total of 15, are also said to have been born of this couple, but died in infancy: Aaron Delp, Ida May Delp, Salome Delp, and Roy Delp (Information supplied in the narratives and charts drafted by members of the Henry and Lucetta (Lettie") Delp Grobe descendants.)

II-4-1: Pharas Thomas Delp was born 29 July 1867 in Geneseo, IL, and died 4 June 1949 in Fergus Falls, MN, according to his obituary published on p.4, col. 5, of the 9 June 1949 Ivanhoe (MN) Times. In his last years, Pharas suffered from Alzheimer's Disease, according to his neice, Judy Delp, with whom he lived in his last years. His hospitalization occured as the result of his wandering at night and mental confusion secondary to the illness.

Pharas was a life time bachelor and farmer. In 1904, he resided in Milford, Iowa, according to the legal proceedings to settle his grandfather, William Tombow, Jr.'s estate.

Pharas was joined by his younger brother, John Delp, Jr., in Milford a few years later and they became life long partners in farming. The two brothers moved to Brookings County in South Dakota, near the town of White to continue farming there. They then moved on to Hendricks, MN, and then to Lincoln County, MN, near the town of Arco, in 1914 (County Atlas). Here the two brothers continued to rent farms until John bought a farm in 1942 near Arco, MN, which his two shildren, Judy and Aaron Delp still own, according to Judy.

Pharas suffered from severe stomach ulcers requiring part of his stomach to be removed, according to his niece, and had poor health thereafter.

Pharas was buried from the Bethany-Elim Lutheran Church in Ivanhoe and interred in Arco Cemetery. He has a head stone.

II-4-2: Elizabeth Delp, born in 1868 (1870 Census) or 1869 (1880 Census). married William Grobe, born 1867, son of William Grobe and Elvena Swismitch, according to Stella M. Grobe, a Lee County (IL) genealogist. This same source reports the following information in a letter to this writer, dated 30 May 199l, from 612 Second Ave., Dixon, IL 6102l:

William and Elizabeth Delp Grobe had a daughter, Etta Grobe. Etta is the only heir of her mother mentioned in the 1904 legal proceedings against the heirs of William Tombow, Jr., If there were other children from this marriage, they died in infancy.

II-4-2-1: Etta Grobe married Wilbur Spielman. This couple had 7-8 children. They were divorced. Etta Grobe remarried to Harold Durham and had one child. Etta Grobe Durham died in Elgin State Hospital in 1967 and is buried in a single lot in Dixon's Oakwood Cemetery.

(The Spielman name was erroneously linked as the husband of Etta's mother, Elizabeth Delp, in Leonard Delp's Delps Galore.)

In 1904, Etta Grobe was in Cottonwood County, Jeffers, MN, with her father William Grobe, according to the legal proceedings started in 1904 by David Kauffman to get a clear title to the property of William Tombow, Jr. (Etta's great-grandfather). As Etta is an heir, Elizabeth Delp Grobe, her mother, died before 1904.

No further information is known about this branch of the family at this writing.

II-4-3: Lydia Delp is the third child of John Delp, Sr., and Catherine Tombow. She was born in 1870 (1880 Census). She lived into adulthood, but did not marry. She is believed to be buried in Riverside Cemetery in Whiteside County, IL, or in Pine Grove Cemetery in Lee County.

However, an inquiry with the Riverside Cemetery indicated no record of her burial there and a list of stones in the Pine Grove Cemetery found in the Dixon, IL, Library does not mention Lydia's name either. She could, of course, be buried without a marker.

II-4-4: Theodore Delp is the fourth child of John Delp, Sr., and Catherine Tombow. He was born in 187l (1880 Census).

An entry appears for him in the 1900 Federal Census as follows (Sterling, IL, entry 162/163, Household of Richard Covel):

Delp, Theodore, male, age 28, single, laborer, born in IL, parents born in PA.

The marriage records of Whiteside County indicate that he married Cora Moates on 24 December 1901.

Leonard Delp in his Delps Galore indicates the births of two children from from the County Birth Records:

II-4-4-1: Florence Delp, born 25 July 1905

II-4-4-2: Ralph T. delp, born March, l9l9.

A 1910 Federal Census of Whiteside County has the following entry for Theodore and his family in Sterling, Ward 1 (entry 325/352):

Delp, Theodore, male, age 37, married, works in a wire mill factory Cora, female, age 28, married, wife, born in IL, father in Ohio, mother in KY. Elsie, female, age 4. daughter, born IL as were parents John, male, age 71, widower, father, born in PA, parents in Ohio

This last entry suggests that John Delp, Sr., spent his last years with his son, Theodore, as his death occurred in 1910 or 1912.

Theodore Delp died 10 January 1942, according to Leonard Delp in Delps Galore. The Interment Index for Riverside Cemetery, Sterling, indicates his date of interment as 13 January 1942 in Section 18, Lot 1702, Grave 3.

II-4-5: Mary Delp was the fifth child of John Delp, Sr., and Catherine Tombow. She was born in 1873 (1880 Census).

There appears to be an entry for her in the 1900 Federal Census in the city of Sterling, ward 4, in the household of the Russell Bell Family, entry 3/3:

Delp, Mary, female, age 27, single, servant.

The Whiteside County Marriage records indicate that she was married to Lester Coffey on 17 February 1901.

In 1904 Mary and her husband were living in Spirit Lake, Iowa, according to the legal proceedings brought by David Kauffman against the heirs of William Tombow, Jr., in order to get clear title to William's property.

According to Judy Delp, her niece, she divorced her husband, and subsequently died in a house fire.

The divorce must have taken place around 1910 as she is found living with her sister Amanda's family in the Federal Census of that year.

The listing is the household of Oliver Boyer in Sterling, IL, ward 1, entry 195/196. In the household are Mary's sister Amanda and Amanda's four children: Cora, Roy, William, and Dora.

Mary appears to have a 1 year old daughter at this time named Marjorie. Marjorie's father is listed as born in Texas. Marjorie was born in Iowa (1909). Mary is noted to be a housekeeper in the home.

Marjorie's birth certificate may be rcecorded in Spirit Lake, Iowa or its County Seat.

The Divorce Records in the Whiteside County Court House will probably provide more information about Mary, Lester and their child(ren).

II-4-6: Emma Delp was the sixth child of John Delp, Sr., and Catherine Tombow. She was born on 3 January 1877 according to her daughter-in-law, Margaret Burmeister, 300 Chestnut, Woodstock, IL 60098.

Emma appears to have an entry in the 1900 Federal Census with the Charles N. Russell Family in Sterling, IL, ward 3, entry 183/190:

Delp, Emma, female, age 21, servant, born in IL, parents born in PA.

The following information has been supplied by Margaret Burmeister, mentioned above.

Emma married on September 2l (year unknown) in Lee County, Dixon, IL. to Henry Burmeister, Jr, born 17 December 1870 in Walnut, IL, the son of Henry Burmeister Sr., and Catherine Bower. Henry, Jr., was a farmer. He died in May, 1950, and is buried in Oakland Cemetery in Woodstock, IL, next to his wife Emma, who died 24 June 1960.

Emma Delp and Henry Burmeister, Jr., had three children: Russell Burmeister, Elmer Burmeister, and Glenn Eugene Burmeister.

II-4-6-1 Russell Burmeister died of spinal meningitis at the age of six months in Longmont, Colorado, where he is buried.

II-4-6-2: Elmer Burmeister was born 3 january 1907 in Woodstock, IL. He married Arlene Hobe in 1929. Elmer died on 27 December 1962 and is buried in Oakland Cemetery in Woodstock, IL. His wife, Arlene, remarried to Mr Elfert. She was living in 1990.

Elmer Burmeister and Arlene Hobe had two children: Roland Glenn Burmeister and Brian Burmeister.

II-4-6-2-1: Roland Glenn Burmeister, born 25 July 1932. Roland Glenn Burmeister lives at 5 South 070 Pebblewood Drive, Apt. F6, Naperville, IL 60540. Telephone: (H) 1-708-983-8748; (W) 1-708-462-4000. Roland

II-4-6-2-1: Brian Burmeister, the second child of Elmer Burmiester and Arlene Hobe, was born 11 December 1940. Brian married Linda Richert, born 22 October 1947 in Chicago, IL, the daughter of Rgginald Richert and Lorraine Feltz. Brian and Linda were married 18 May 1974. He is a commercial print representative. Linda is a costomer services representative.. They reside at 7921 Valley Flores Drive, Canoga Park, CA, 91304. They have one adopted son, David Burmeister, born 25 March 1967 in Danville, KY.

II-4-6-3 Glenn Eugene Burmeister, the third child of Henry Burmeister, Jr. and Emma Delp, was born 11 July 1915 in Woodstock, IL. He married 19 June 1937 in Woodstock, IL, Margaret Evelyn Kline, born 30 December 1913 in Woodstock, IL, the daughter of Joseph Kline and Eva Kline. Glen Eugene was a farmer and manager of a bowling lanes.

Glenn Eugene Burmeister and Margaret Evelyn Kline had two children: Eugene Glenn Burmeister and Peggy Jean Burmeister.

II-4-6-3-1: Eugene Glenn Burmeister, born 2-10-1939, married Sally Lou Shales, born 17 November 1938 in Elgin, IL, the daughter of George and Mildred Shales. They were married on 14 October 1960 in Elgin, IL. Eugene is a manager of Arkey Co. Eugene and Sally Burmeister reside at 3511 Crest Court, Franklin, Wisconsin 53132.

Eugene and Sally Shales Burmeister had three children: Lance, Lane, and David Burmeister.

II-4-6-3-1-1 Lance Burmeister, born 18 December 196l at Elgin, IL, married 21 September 1985 in Woodstock, IL, Kelly Biscomb, the daughter of William and Lois Biscomb. Lance and Kelly Burmeister reside at 2629 Wingate, Aurora, IL 60504. Lance and Kelly Biscomb Burmesiter have one son, Dane William Burmeister.

II-4-6-3-1-1-1: Dane William Burmeister, born 5 April 1989.

II-4-6-3-1-2: Lane Burmeister, the second son of Eugene Glenn Burmeister and Sally Lous Shales, was born 4 July 1964 in Woodstock, IL. Resides with parents.

II-4-6-3-1-2: David Burmeister, the third son of Eugene Glenn and Sally Lou Shales Burmeister, was born 13 May 1966 in Woodstock, IL. He resides in Woodstock.

II-4-6-3-2: Peggy Jean Burmeister, the second child of Glenn Eugene Burmeister and Margaret Evelyn Kline, was born 1 March 1948 in Woodstock, IL. Single. She is employed as a school psychologist in Highland Park, IL. She resides at 6809 Bull Valley Road, McHenry, IL 60050.

II-4-7: Franklin Delp, the seventh child of John Delp, Sr., and Cetherine Tombow, was born in 1879 (1880 Census) and died in September 1881, according to Leonard Delp in his book Delps Galore.

II-4-8: Lucetta Delp, the eighth child of John Delp, Sr. and Catherine Tombow, was born 6 March 1881, according to a family history sent to me by Elsie Kraft, 2056 Peek Home Road, Dixon, IL, 61021.

She was known as "Lettie" to her descedants. She was probably born in Jordan Township in Whiteside County, IL, but in early childhood her fam- ly must have moved to neighboring Lee County, as she went to elementary schools south of Dixon, according to the family history sent to me and includes with this History.

Lettie married 19 September 1901 in Dixon, IL, Henry Grobe, born 19 May 1880, the son of John Christian Grobe, who immigrated from Saxon, Germany, and Barbra Ellen Smith.

The life of Henry and Lettie Delp Grobe is told in a family narrative attached to this history and will not be recapitulated here.

Henry Grobe died 23 September 1950. Lettie Delp Grobe died 13 May 1965. Both are buried in Pine Grove Cemetery in Lee County, IL.

Lettie Delp and Henry Grobe had ll children:

II-4-8-1: Russel Grobe, born 3 August 1902 and died 19 May 1983.

II-4-8-2: Ellen Grobe Harden, born 30 September 1903, died 10 December 1975.

II-4-8-3: Roy T. Grobe, born 7 June 1905, died 15 March 1988. Married Mildred A. Drew, born 1907, died 1978. Children included: Elsie L. Grobe and Earnest Grobe, 22 November 1936 and died 3 July 1987. All deceased family members are buried in Sugar Grove AKA Palmyra Cemetery, Palmyra Township, Lee County, IL.

II-4-8-4: Ida Grobe Levan, born 27 September 1906, died 18 September 1989.

II-4-8-5: Betty Grobe Bohn, born 8 February 1907.

II-4-8-6: John Grobe, born 4 March 1910.

II-4-8-7: Henry Grobe, born 31 May 1912, died 21 Janaury 1981.

II-4-8-8: Earl Grobe, born 16 february 1915.

II-4-8-9: Dorothy Grobe Bosshart, born 30 january 1917.

II-4-8-10: Lorraine Grobe Elsasser, born 18 August 1923.

II-4-8-11: Harold Grobe, born 21 March 1925, died 31 March 1925; burial in Pine Grove Cemetery, Lee County, IL.

The above members of the the Grobe family appear to have settled near each other in a family compound near Dixon, IL.

II-4-9: Amanda Delp, the ninth child of John Delp, Sr., and Catherine Tombow, was born in 1886 (1910 Federal Census)

Reference to Amanda and her family is found in the 1910 Federal Census of Whiteside County, IL, Sterling, Ward 1, entry 195/196:

Boyer, Oliver, male, age 31, married, factory implement worker, born in IL, parents born in OH.

Amanda, female, age 24, married, wife, born IL, parents in PA. Cora, female, age 7, born in Iowa Roy, male, age 6, born in Iowa William, male, age 4, born in Iowa Dora, female, age 7 months, born Iowa.

Also in this entry is found her sister, Mary Delp Coffey, age 32, housekeeper, with her one year old daughter, Marjorie. Mary may have been divorcing her husband, Lester Coffey, at this time, and required a place to stay.

Amanda and her family were in Lamoni, Iowa, in 1904, according to the legal proceedings brought against the heirs of William Tombow, Jr, her maternal grandfather, by David Kauffman to get a clear title to Willam Tombow's property. The story of this matter is told elsewhere in this history narrating the life of William Tombow, Jr.

This may explain where in Iowa her children were born and the age of the last child, Dora (7 months) indicates they had only recently returned from Iowa to Sterling.

Amanda Boyer died in the 1950's according to her grandniece, Elsie Kraft, and is buried in Sterling, IL.

II-4-10: Kate Delp, the tenth child of John Delp, Sr., and Catherine Tombow, was born in 1893 and died in 1950 (Her tombstone in Pine Grove Cemetery, Lee County, IL). Kate farmed with her two brothers, Pharas and John Delp in Minnesota during the late 1920'a and early 1930's. However, as she began interfering with the courtship of her brother John and his finacee, Martha Sukr, she returned to Illinois, where she lived with her sister Emma in Woodstock, IL, until she died, according to her niece, Judy Delp of Arco, MN. Kate Delp never married.

II-4-11: John Delp, Jr., the eleventh child of John Delp, Sr., and Catherine Tombow, was born in Harmon, IL, in 1897, according to his daughter, Judy Delp, who supplied the information in this entry to the writer in a letter dated 14 December 1990 and while visiting her in the Summer of 1991.

After 1904 John followed his brother to Milford, Iowa, where the two became life time partners in farming. They moved from there to a farm in Brookings County, near White, MN. Their next farm was in Hendricks, MN, where John met his future wife, Martha Sukr.

John had a great love of farming according to his daughter, but he did enlist in the army during World War I and fought in Argonne Forest, France. He served from 1918 to 1919. Since he was in Arco from 1914 on, John probably enlisted from Lincoln County, MN.

Judy tells of one incident in the War that left John bitter and that was the fact that he had a defective gas mask and told his commanding officer. As they did not believe him, his eyes were burned badly when he was gassed. Judy states he never sought compensation for this accident, despite his bitterness about it.

Judy also states that he was a devoted family man.

John Delp, Jr., and Martha Sukr were married 5 March 1931 in Ivanhoe, MN. The couple lived in Lincoln County, MN for all of their married life. John and his brother, Pharas rented farms until John bought a farm near Arco, MN in 1942.

Judy Delp states that her aunt Kate Delp farmed with her brothers for a time until her interference in the courtship of her brother John, by hiding letters from Martha to him, forced her to return to Woodstock, IL.

John Delp, Jr., and Martha Sukr had two children: Aaron Delp and Judy Delp.

II-4-11-l: Aaron Delp was born near Arco, MN, on 31 January 1932. Single Lives on his parents' farm near Arco, MN 56113.

II-4-11-2: Judy Delp was born 4 August 1941 near Arco, MN. Single. Lives with brother, Aaron, on her parents' farm, near Arco, MN 56113. She graduated from Ivanhoe (MN) Public High School.

John Delp, Jr. died suddenly on 6 January 1966 and his wife Martha Sukr Delp died 8 October 1970 from complications associated with diabetes. They are buried in the Arco Cemetery and their grave is marked with a stone.

Compiled and written by:
Patrick L. Tombeau
April, 1993 
Tombow, Catherine (I04326)
 
29 The Descendants of Elizabeth Tombow and Emanuel Miles Groff

II-3: Elizabeth Tombow was the third child of William Tombow, Jr., and Elizabeth Rohrer of Lancaster County, Pennsylvania, Her grave stone in Marshalltown, Iowa indicates she was born 15 October 1843. She died at the age of 88 on 5 March 1932 in Marshalltown, Iowa, and is buried in Riverside Cemetery in that city. She was probably named after her mother. Her paternal grandparents were William Tombos, who immigrated to this country from the Netherlands in 1802, and Mary Herzkey, of German descent.

There are three records that indicate that Elizabeth Tombow was the daughter of William Tombow, Jr.: the Lancaster County 1852-55 register of Births, Marriages, and Deaths, where she is recorded in the birth record of her younger brother, William. She is also mentioned as his heir in the Letter of Administration filed in 1865 in the Whiteside County, IL, Circuit Court. Thirdly, she is mentioned as his heir in papers filed in 1904 by David Kauffman in the Whiteside County Circuit Court against the heirs of William Tombow in order to obtain clear title to William's property 39 years after his death.

Our first sight of Elizabeth Tombow is found in the 1850 Federal Census of Lancaster County, Pennsylvania, where she is recorded mistakenly as age 9 in the household of Abraham Rohrer, perhaps a maternal uncle.

The entry was taken on 14 August 1850 in Manheim Township in Lancaster County, PA, dwelling #14:

Abraham Rohrer, age 33, laborer, born in PA, real estate valued at $10,000 Barbra Rohrer, age 24 years
Elias Rohrer, age 5 years
Samuel Meking, 12 years
Elizabeth Tombo, age 9 years, not in school in the last year
Jacob Bunsdorfer, age 21 years, blacksmith

Elizabeth's father was quite adept at farming his children out to other people for their care and upkeep. In this same census, her older brother is located both in his paternal grandfather's household and then in the household of a farmer named John Weaver. Her other brothers and sisters are likewise dispersed throughout Lancaster County.

In 1853, when Elizabeth was only 9 or 10, her mother died. Her father was quick to remarry to a woman named Fanny. He sold his land in 1853 and went West to Whiteside County, IL, in 1856, according to his daughter, Lydia Tombow Fluck. Whether Elizabeth was one of the children brought along, or left behind for a while is not known.

However, in the 1860 Federal Census of Whiteside County, IL, like all of her other brothers and sisters, she is not found in the household of her father but that of a stranger, a deacon in the Mennonite Church. The entry is in Jordan township (p.104). Her name contorted to read as "Elizabeth Tornbow" in the nearly illegible hand of the census taker.

Ephraim Hendricks, age 35, $2,550 in real estate, $600 in personal property
Mary Hendricks, age 35 (?) born in PA
Allen Hendricks, age 10 years, male, born in PA
B.F. Hendricks, age 9 years, male, born In PA
John Hendricks, age 5 years, male, born in PA
Charles Hendricks, age 1 year, male, born in PA
John Schuler, age 21 years, farm laborer, born Baden Germany
Elizabeth Tornbow, age 17, domestic, born in PA

Whiteside County, IL, Court Records indicate that "Lizzie" Tombow married Emanuel Groff on 28 January 1869 (Lic. No. 2240).

Emanuel Groff was born 23 May 1845 in Lancaster County, PA, according to his grave stone and military papers.

The following information is found in the Civil War pension papers of Emanuel Miles Groff. He enlisted at the age 18, on 29 June 1863 in the City of Lancaster, PA, with the rank of private in Co. F or the 50th Regiment of the Pennsylvania Volunteers on the side of the Union. He mustered out less than two months later on 15 August 1863 at Camp Calwalader, Philadelphia, PA. He re-enlisted in the Pennsylvania Independent Light Artillery, Battery "I", in the City of Lancaster on 29 August 1864 with the rank of private. He was declared disabled on 15 August 1864 due to chronic tonsillitis and deafness in the right ear, and given an honorable discharge in Philadelphia on 23 June 1865.

His pension papers indicate that Emanuel was 5 feet five inches tall at maturity, had grey eyes, dark complexion and dark hair.

On 28 March 1899 he applied for a pension based upon a double hernia, incapacitating him for work, for which he received a $12 per month stipend until his death in 1910.

In 1865, at the age of 20, He left Lancaster County, PA and settled in the city of Sterling, Whiteside County, IL. The 1870 Federal Census for Whiteside County, IL, indicates he was a drayman.(Sterling, entry 45/45)

Their first child, Arthur Lee Groff was born in Whiteside County, IL, on 5 September 1870 and their second child, Berenice Clarissa Groff was also born there on 20 November 1872.

In 1874, Emanuel moved with his young children, ages 4 and 2, and his wife, Lizzie, to Marshalltown, Iowa, where he lived the rest of his life.

Emanuel was employed as a janitor at the Union Station in Marshalltown for many years where he was a familiar figure according to his obituary in the Marshalltown Times-Republican of 10 March 1910. Later he worked for the Marshalltown Trowel Company. Emanuel and his wife Lizzie lived at 418 E. Nevada St. (This home no longer exists) until about a year before he succumbed to his final illness, cancer of the liver on 7 March 1910. He spent his last days in the home of his daughter, Berenice whop lived at 411 North First St. He expired at 1:30 in the afternoon according to his obituary. He is buried in the Riverside Cemetery in Marshalltown beside his wife. His grave is marked with a stone.

His widow, Lizzie Tombow Groff, lived on another two years.

Emanuel Miles Groff and Elizabeth Tombow had two children: Arthur Lee Groff and Berenice Clarissa Groff.

II-3-1: Arthur Lee Groff, the older of the two children of Emanuel Miles Groff and Elizabeth Tombow, was born in Sterling, IL, on 5 September 1870. When he was four years old, his parents moved with him and his younger sister Berenice to Marshalltown, Iowa, according to his father's Civil War pension papers.

A few days past his twentieth birthday, on 17 September 1890 he married at Marshalltown, IA, Jennie Irene Harris, born 8 June 1872 (Poll Tax Index 1934), the daughter of Benjamin Harris and Virginia Armstrong (Death Certificate).

They took up residence in Boone, Iowa, in about 1904, according to city directories, where they remained the rest of their lives. They resided at 422 Cedar in Boone from 1904 to 1914-15; at 825 13th from 1915 to 1924-25; at 1115 Greene until 1928-29; then at 1201 Carst; then in 1936 they are again on Cedar Street at no. 109; then back to Garst (1417); in 1947 they are living at 320 Cedar; finally from 1956-61 Arthur lives 309 14th.

Jennie Irene Harris Groff died at the age of 85 in the Tryon Nursing Home, 309 14th St., on 23 December 1957 of a combination of heart attacks, strokes and senility (Death Certificate). She was buried in Riverside Cemetery in Marshalltown, Iowa.

Her obituaries published in the 24 December 1957 and 14 January 1958 Boone News-Republican indicate she was born in Marshalltown, Iowa, where she was raised and attended the public schools. She joined the Methodist Church as a young girl and was active in its activities all of her life. She was a member of the Berean Sunday School Class and the Woman's Society of Christian Service. She also belonged to the Auxillary to the Brotherhood of Locomotive Firemen and Engineers, the Order of the Eastern Star and Headlight Lodge no. 16.

In November 1961 Arthur moved from his home at 309 14th, where he was living with his widowed daughter, Ruth Groff Trusler, to the Rowley Memorial Masonic Home in Perry.

On 1 April 1963 he transferred to the Boone County Home, Boone, IA, where he died 24 March 1964, at the age of 93, of arteriosclerosis, heart failure and uremia, at 4:30 PM. He was buried in Riverside Ceme- tery, Marshalltown, IA, with his wife, sister and parents.

His obituaries published in the Boone News Republican on 25 March and 21 April 1964 note that he had 60 years of service with the Chicago and Northwestern Railroad as a locomotive engineer. He was a member of the First Methodist Church in Boone, IA. He had also been a member of the Boone Masonic Lodge and the Consistory at Clinton, IA.

Arthur Groff's great-grandson, Brian Stawarz, has commemorated his great-grandfather in a song whose lyrics were sent on to me in August, 199l, by Virginia Stawarz, Brian's mother.

My great grandpa spent his life upon the train He rode it through the wind and through the sun and pouring rain. He drove that train every week from Boone to Illinois, He ran an engine most will only know as but a toy, but a toy.

He'd ridden trains for fifty years when Hitler made the war, And he'd been much too old to fight the one that came before. So he pulled his cap on tight and hauled those young men 'cross the land He took those boys from their homes somewhere to make a stand, make a stand.

Chorus:

Oh great grandpa, I have seen you in my dreams, Rolling through the fields of corn and children by the streams. I can almost see you through the mist as you're rolling down the track, And then I see your shining eyes, as you break into the sun, never looking back.

I only saw him one time, and he held me on his knee, I know him mostly through the stories my mom told to me. He'd take her to the round house when departure time would come, His train was called the Challenger, and how that engine hummed, how it hummed.

he checked that diesel up and down, an oil can in his hand, He never said too much because he was a quiet man. She'd play up in the engine with him almost every time, And when he left she'd always get a nickel or a dime, everytime.

Arthur Lee Groff and Jennie Irene Harris and three children: Ruth Groff, Elene Dorothy Groff, and Harris L. Groff.

II-3-1-1: Ruth Trusler was born 1 September 1890 in Marshalltown, IA, and moved to Boone, IA, at the age of 14 with her parents and younger sister, Elene, and brother, Harris.

She married Howard F. Trusler, a traveling salesman from Warren, Pennsylvania, age 26, in Boone, IA, on 13 December 1913. She was 23. He was born in Sinclairesville, N.Y., the son of Frank and Augie F. Trusler. (Register of Marriages, No.4, Lic. 7774, Boone, Co. IA)

Prior to her death she had been widowed. She lived the last 8 years of her life in Boone, IA, her last home being at 309 14th St, which she shared with her father until he retired to the Masonic Home in Perry.

she died in her home on 28 December 1962, age 70, of complications from hypertension, heart problems, and arteriosclerosis. She was buried in Oakland Cemetery, Warren, PA. (Death Certificate).

Her obituary, published in the 28 December 1962 Boone News Republican, indicates that prior to her death she had fallen and broken her hip in the spring and had not been well since. She had moved to Boone8 years before from Ohio, perhaps from Chagrin Falls, Ohio, where her son, Howard F. Trusler, Jr., lived at the time of her death.

Ruth Groff and Howard F. Trusler, Sr., had one son: Howard F. Trusler, Jr.

II-3-1-1-1: Howard F. Trusler, Jr. married Rachel Harris, the daughter of Ezra J. Harris and Jennie Jones. Rachel currently lives at 910 W. 3rd St., Jamestown, NY. (716) 487-1662.

Howard F. Trusler, Jr. and Rachel Harris had two children: William Trusler and Bruce Trusler.

II-3-1-1-1-1: William Trusler married Mary Wehr. They reside at 23 Gannett Hollow Place, Woodlands, TX 77381. William is an air controller. Mary is an airline pilot.

William Trusler and Mary Wehr have two children:

II-3-1-1-1-1-1: Susan Caroline Trusler

II-3-1-1-1-1-2: Jennifer Lane Trusler

II-3-1-1-1-2: Bruce Trusler is the second son of Howard F. Trusler, Jr., and Rachel Harris. He is a practicing dentist in Ypsilanti, MI. He married Sheila Brezina, the daughter of Robert Brezina and Shirley Sylvester. Bruce and Sheila Trusler live at 203 Sheffield Court, Saline, MI. (313) 429-9364.

Bruce Trusler and Sheila Brezina have four children: Shelley Kim, Andrew Harris, Adam Robert, and Emily Kay.

Shelley Kim Trusler is the adopted step-daughter of Bruce Trusler.

II-3-1-1-1-2-1: Andrew Harris Trusler, born 12 December 1979

II-3-1-1-1-2-2: Adam Robert Trusler, born 22 March 1983

II-3-1-1-1-2-3: Emily Kay Trusler, born 3 September 1986.

II-3-1-2: Harris L. ("Dick") Groff was the second child of Arthur Lee Groff and Jennie Irene Harris. He was born 9 August 1897 in Marshalltown, IA. At the age of 6 he moved to Boone, IA, with his parents where he received his education.(Obituary published in the 28 October 1958 Boone News Republican) He graduated from Boone High School in 1916 and his picture from the Yearbook of that year is included with this history. He is described as follows in his yearbook:

"Stored away in his anatomy he has considerable humor, which at very rare times comes to the surface. Sometimes he releases his dignity and laughs, and then instantly he's as sober as a deacon again."

The Yearbook indicates that he was in the High School Commercial curriculum and that he was a member of the Eutrophian Literary Society, the Bumble "B" staff of 1916, class play, Class Basketball '16, and stenography Club.

He married 22 May 1918 Corrine Delaney of Desmoines, IA. At the time of his marriage he was employed in the offices of the Chicago and Northwestern Railroad. Subsequently they made their home in Chicago. (Obituary)

In 1936 he accepted a position with the C.A. Dunham Co. as traffic manager. where he had been employed since, being transferred to the Michigan City, IN, plant in 1949. (Obituary, 28 October 1958, BN-R)

He became a member of the First Methodist Church in Boone at an early age, and at the time of his death, was a member of the First Methodist Church in Michigan City, IN. He was also a member of Lodge 500 A.F. & A. M. of DesMoines, the Scottish Rite Consistory No. 2, Lincoln, NB, and the Michiana Traffic Club.

He died at the age of 61 in Michigan City, IN., 6 October 1958, and is buried in Linwood Park Cemetery, Boone, IA. (Obituary, 8 October 1958 in the Boone News-Republican.

Corrine Delaney Groff died less than a year later, after a lingering illness, on 5 September 1959, in her home in Desplaines, IL. She is buried in Linwood Park Cemetery. She was a graduate of Boone High School and a member of the First Methodist Church. (Obituary, 8 September 1959, Boone News-Republican)

Harris Groff and Corinne Delaney had one daughter: Harriet Jane Groff.

II-3-1-2-1 Harriet Jane Groff was born 30 January 1922, in Boone, Iowa (Obit in 8 Oct 1990 Everett (WA) Herald) She married Donald Becraft in the Chicago area around 1955. Donald was a mechanic. The family moved to Everett, WA in 1969. (Information supplied by Virginia Stawarz, Harriet's cousin and Harriet's obituary)

Harriet Jane Groff Becraft died at the age of 68 on 4 October 1990 in Everett, WA.

Donald Becraft and Harriet Jane Groff had two daughters: Jennifer Ann and Brenda Becraft.

II-3-1-2-1-1: Jennifer Ann Becraft born c. 1959, DesPlaines, IL. She married Kurt Ohlund 13 December 1980 in Everett, WA. Reside at 12205 182nd Drive, N.E., Arlington, WA 98223. Jennifer and Kurt have two children:

II-3-1-2-1-1-1: Nathaniel Ohlund, born 14 June 1982, Everett, WA.

II-3-1-2-1-1-2: Kadie Ohlund, born 31 March 1984, Everett, WA.

II-3-1-2-1-2: Brenda Becraft is the second daughter of Donald Becraft and Harriet Jane Groff. She married Richard Frazee. She resides in Lake Stevens WA. (206) 691-4429.

II-3-1-3: Elene Dorothy Groff was the third child of Arthur L. Groff and Jennie Harris. Elene was born 3 May 1903 in Boone, IA (Death Certifi- cate). She graduated from Boone High School in 1921 where she was in a commercial curriculum. She belonged to the Eutrophian Literary Society, Class Basketball, 1921, Bumble "B", Girl Reserves and Glee Club while she was in High School (!921 Boone High Year Book). During High School she also took an active part in the YWCA, becoming a board member for seven years. She was also the state representative for the YWCA Board. (Obituary, Boone News-Republic, 20 December 1954)

Elene was a member of the First Methodist Church since Cradle Roll days, serving in all departments, and becoming President of the Woman's Society of Christian Service. She was a Member of the Eastern Star and the Order of Beauceant and was active in the Woman's Club. (Obituary)

Elene married 8 June 1924 to Ralph A. Jones, a pharmacist in Boone, IA. (Obituary). Ralph A. Jones was born 26 June 1901, the son of Arthur Jones and Matilda Kramme, in Buffalo Center, Winnebago County, IA. (Marriage License).

On 11 December 1954 the Boone News Republican published the following article on its front page:

BOONE WOMAN BURNS TO DEATH ON FRIDAY

Tragedy struck in Boone Friday forenoon but it was not discovered until after 6 p.m. when Ralph Jones, Boone Druggist, came home to find the body of his wife at their home 320 Cedar street..

Mrs, Elene Jones, 51 years, had burned to death during the forenoon, but because her husband had attended a High Twelve luncheon at noon he had not gone home and hence had not discovered the tragedy.

According to County Coroner, Dr G. H. Sutton, Mrs. Jones had tried to light the oven in her kitchen of her home while still attired in night clothes and a housecoat. Apparently the first attempt had failed and she lighted it a second time, but the oven had filled with gas and exploded, catching her clothing on fire.

Dr. Sutton said there were two burned matches near the stove. He added that apparently Mrs. Jones had extinguished the flames on her clothing which had caused serious burns about her entire body. She then apparently went upstairs to her bedroom to dress to summon help when she collapsed and died. Survivors, besides Mr. Jones include an only daughter, Virginia, who teaches in Evanston, Illinois; her parents, Mr. and Mrs. Arthur Groff of this city; a sister, Mrs Ruth Trusler, Warren, Penn., and a brother, Richard Groff of Chicago.

Funeral services will be held monday afternoon at 2 o'clock from the First Methodist church with Dr. Edwin Frohardt in charge. Friends may call at the Welin chapel Sunday afternoon between 2 and 5 p.m. and Sunday evening between 7 and 9 p.m. to register.

Elene's death certificate states she died 10 December 1954 of burns to the body. She was buried in Linwood park Cemetery, Boone, IA.

Slightly less that a year later, on 24 November 1955 Ralph Jones remarried to a divorcee, Arlene Birdella Winter, 14 August 19l8, in Pilot Mound, IA, the daughter of Joseph J. Zunkel and Anna L. Rinehart. She was a saleslady in a shoe store at the time of this marriage.

Ralph Jones was a pharmacist for 52 years, having been employed at Miller Drug for 37 years and at the Boone County Hospital for the last 12 years of his life. He was employed at Stanhope for three years before coming to Boone. He was a member of the First United Methodist Church, Mt. Olive Lodge No. 79, Tuscan Chapter Commandery, Masonic Lodge High Twelve and Low Twelve. He helped organize the Boone County Credit Union and served as treasurer and as a member of the auditor committee. He was a member of the Boone Story County Drug Association.

He died 7 June 1973, age 71, of longstanding lymphatic leukemia. His last residence was 225 S Greene St. He is buried in Linwood Park Cemetery, Boone, IA.

Elene Dorothy Groff and Ralph A. Jones had one daughter, Virginia Ruth Jones.

II-3-1-3-1: Virginia Ruth Jones, born 24 September 1930 in Boone, IA. She married Edmund Stawarz. She lives at 545 Third Avenue, Clinton, IA. She is a special education for Clinton Community High School, teacher of the Trainable Mentally Retarded..

Virginia graduated from Boone High School in 1948. Her high school yearbook indicates she was in the language curriculum. She was in the Bumble "B", Quill and Scroll, National Honor Society, B-Y-ettes, Hi-Tri, Orchestra, Mixed Chorus, Girl's Glee Club, Girl's Sextette, Boy's Quartette, , String Ensemble, Violin Quartette, and String Trio, as extracurricular activities during her high school years.

Virginia Jones and Edmund Stawarz had one child: Brian Stawarz.

II-3-1-3-1-1: Brian Stawarz, born 23 March 1958; MA in Psychology from the U. of Iowa; works for Human Services, Inc., 7066 Stillwater Blvd, Oakdale, MN 55119; resides 1900 E. Shore Drive #21, Maplewood, MN 55109

II-3-2: The second child of Elizabeth Tombow and Emanuel Miles Groff was Berenice Clarissa Groff who was born 20 November 1872 in Sterling, IL. At the age of 2 her parents moved to Marshalltown, IA., where she lived until she died at the age of 93. (Father's Civil War Pension Papers)

She graduated from Marshalltown High School according to her obituary in the 24 May 1966 Marshalltown Times-Republican. According to the same source, she married William T(obias) Miller on 26 June 1902 in Boone, Iowa.

William T. Miller was born 29 May 1865 in Toledo, IA, the son of John Miller and Amelia Gerhart. His first marriage was to Ida Ellen Monohon 8 September 1889 in Marshalltown. His first wife died 30 September 1900. (Obituary published in the 9 November 1960 Marshalltown Times-Republican.

The exact date of the above marriage was supplied by Kenneth Ferguson, 301 W. Julian St., Le Grand, IA, 50142, a grandson of William Miller, in correspondence to me, dated 9 October 1989. Of this first marriage there were two daughters, Grace Miller, my correspondent's mother and Marie Miller. The second marriage of William Miller to Berenice Groff was childless, according to Mr. Ferguson, but she raised her step children and grandchildren as if they were her own and was much loved by her step family.

Some insight into the stature of Berenice's mother, Elizabeth Tombow Groff, is given by Mr Ferguson, who refers to her as "Little Grandma Groff".

Berenice was the first woman watchmaker and jeweler in Iowa, according to her obituary. This specialty she must have learned from hr husband as his obituary indicates that he went into the jewelry business with his Dad at the age of 18 and continued in that line of work for 62 years, retiring 15 years before his death at age 93.

Berenice was a member of St. Paul's Episcopal Church, a past president of St. Paul's Guild, and a past president of the Marshalltown Women's Club.

Berenice Clarissa Groff Miller died at the age of 93 on 23 May 1966 in Boone, IA, six years after her husbands death in Boone on 8 November 1960. Both are buried in Riverside Cemetery, Marshalltown, IA.

Their last residence was 411 N. 1st St., Marshalltown.

As no children were born of Berenice, her line is extinct.

The many death, marriage, and birth certificates, the photocopies of the Yearbooks, the several obituaries referred to in this branch of the family, as well as much other useful work was performed without fees in advance by the knowledgeable and resourceful Larry Adams, Forensic Consultant, 812 « Story St., Boone, IA. This writer is much indebted to his indefatigable research which came out of the blue one day in one fell swoop.

Compiled and written by

Patrick L. Tombeau April, 1993 
Tombow, Elizabeth (I04324)
 
30 First I must tell that when my mother married my father, Rollie, her grandfather, tried to tell her that my father's father, Austin Cousino was
her third cousin. Neither of my parents believed him now they wished they would have listen to him and all his stories.
My father is buried in St. Joe's Cemetery with many other Knaggs and Cousino. I am trying to photograph what I can.
Rollie grew up in a French speaking family. His mother Angeline Cousineau knew very little English. Rollie attended school on the SE
corner of Sterns and Crab Rd. with his sisters Anne and Julia. This is where they quickly learned English. The school, still standing is
now called Banner Oak school but was called Lord School at that time. When Rollie married Lillian Engel (pronounced Angel at that time)
he had a pet saying, "I went the Lord's school, I married an Angel (Engel) but I've been in hell ever since."
Rollie and Lillian had seven children and each one was born at a different house. It wasn't until 1945 then both Rollie and Lillian Knaggs where 73 years of age that bought a house on the east side of Dixie Highway about 500 feet from the home of Rollie's youth. It was the
first time ever they had electricity. Yes, this house too has been since torn down. After Lillian death Rollie helped pay for a new boiler room
at Clark's Greenhouse on Todd Rd off of Lewis in Temperance. Daughter Leona and Maury Clark's. He moved to the farm and enjoyed
working there until his death. 
Knaggs, Lorenzo ("Rollie") (I09689)
 
31 * Burial in Holy Cross Cemetery, 8850 Dix, Detroit, MI.

The following entries were taken from the Detroit Directory for John Albert Jarvis:

Jarvis, John A., laborer, bds 710 Mckinstry (See brother Frank's entry) (1890-92)
Jarvis, John A., laborer, house west side of Riopelle, 3 s of river, River Rouge, 1893
Jarvis, John, Teamster, Belle Isle Partk, 1894
Jarvis, John A., teamster, h. 234 Chestnut, 1895
Jarvis, Joh, wrecker, Arlington Hotel, 1896
Jarvis, John A., laborer, Saliotte and Ferguson, residence, Ecorse, MI., 1897

(No entries in the Detroit Phone Directory for John A. Jarvis for 1898-1902. His residence may have been Ecorse at this time and their City Directories should be consulted for this period. Presumably working for Saliotte and Ferguson at this time. Entries for the Detroit Directory commence again in 1903.)

Jarvis, John, laborer, bds. J.R. Jarvis (his father), Woodmere (Spingwells Ave.)
1903
Jarvis, John A., carpenter, h 22 James Ave, River Rouge, 1904.

(No further entries after 1904, like his father. he may have moved with his father to work the Chilson Farm, near Pinckney, MI., since, according to his younger brother Charles Jarvis, John was instrumental in getting his father to trade city property for the farm. Land records in Detroit and Pinckney are should be research to confirm details.) For further details see his father's entry {Ralph Jarvis})












 
Jarvis, John Albert (I06919)
 
32 Alice May Lerby Zimmerman Dusseau Lisle, widow of Richard Dusseau, Sr., in an interview with Patrick L. Tombeau on July 17, 1964, narrated the following about Ada Dusseau:

Ada Dusseau, daughter of Joseph Dusseau and Mary Cluckey/Cloutier, was 17 years old when she died. Thinking to rid the mop boards of her upstairs bedroom of bed bugs, she started applying gasoline to the woodwork along the floor and reaching a dark cormner of the front bedroom (ay appoint on the second floor just above the home's front door), she lit a match to see better only to burst into flames when the gasoline can exploded.

She immeidately jumped over the bannister to the stairway which was a few feet from the door of her room. she fell on the second step and rolled into the living room in a ball of flames. Her grandfather, John Baptiste Dusseau IV, who had been an invalid for several years, sat in a huge rocking chair in the living room. Accountably, he jumped from the chiar and rolled her in throw rugs.

But Ada had been injured internally by her fall down the stair well, her haird and clothes burnt up in the fire and she died shortly thereafter of the 14th of October,
1893. Her 90 year old grandfather died two months later, the death apparently being brought on by his burns, according to the William Dusseau Family descendants.

Vault certificae says she died in Nov., 1893. She was engaged at the tiem of hr death according to her sister Lena. She was 17 years and 2 months old at time of death, accroding to the Vault Certificate. 
Dusseau, Ada (I00241)
 
33 Ann Tamboo, as her baptismal record at St. Patrick's Catholic Church spells her name, was born in Olyphant on 9 April l902. She died at one month according to her sister Pearl. She is said to be buried in the same grave plot as her sister and cousin. Her death is also not recorded in the Lackawanna Court House, but St. Patrick's records may carry a record of her death. Her grieving mother is said to have written a poem on Ann's death in the Olyphant newspaper, according to Pearl. Tamboo, Ann (I04149)
 
34 Catherine Tombow and Robert Wilson

It has been pointed out previously that the founding parents of the Family, William Tombos and Mary Ann Herzkey, had six children. (Miscellaneous Documents, Lancaster Co. Orphans Court, September, l858, pp. l78-9).

These children in order of birth were John Tombow, William Tombow, Jr., Mary Ann Tombow, Sarah Tombow, Lydia Tombow, and Catherine Tombow.

This chapter of the Family History discusses Catherine Tombow, the sixth and last child of William Tombos and Mary Ann Herzkey.

Catherine Tombow was born 23 June l825 according to Cemetery Records at the Mellinger Mennonite Cemetery in E. Lancaster where she is buried. She was raised in her parents home in E. Lampeter, on the Old Philadelphia Turnpike. A description of this property is found in the chapter on the Origins of the Family.

According to the above cited Orphans Court Records, she married Robert Wilson. Robert Wilson was born December 4, l8l8, as calculated from his obituary age. Robert's parentage is unknown. However, William Tombos purchased land from his next door neighbor, James Wilson on 1 April l84l (Deeds, S-6-74). This lead needs to be explored perhaps by seeking the Will of James Wilson to determine if Robert Wilson is his son.

No marriage date has been found as of this writing. But, as the early Family was Mennonite, they would have been married in a Church with ordained Clergy, perhaps the German Reformed Church or Trinity Lutheran Church in the City of Lancaster.

They were, however, married by l850 as they appear together in her father's Federal Census entry in E. Lampeter as follows (Census taken 28 August l850, dwelling #ll6):

Dombo, William, 6l years, farmer, real estate valued at $2,500 Dombo, Elizabeth, 54 years, born in Pennsylvania Dombo, Samuel , age l4 (?), born in Pennsylvania, attends school Dombo, Mary, 8 years, born in Pennsylvania, attends school Wilson, Robert, 32 years, laborer, born in Pennsylvania Wilson, Catherine, 25 years, born in Pennsylvania

This entry, with a misspelling of the Family name by a German Census taker indicates that she was living with her father, step-mother, Elizabeth and a niece and nephew, children of her older brother, William, Jr. It may also suggest that they were newly weds since they have not yet set up separate housekeeping.

The l860 Federal Census for W. Lampeter Township, in Lancaster County, Pennsylvania, p. 808, dwelling #l33, has the following entry:

Robert Wilson, age 4l, farmer, born in PA, estate valued at $600.
Catherine Wilson, age 35, born in PA
Benjamin T. Groff, age l3, born in PA
Sidney Groff (female), age l5, born in PA
Isaac Gann (?), age l9, farmer, born in PA

Benjamin and Sidney Groff are Catherine's nephew and niece by her older sister Lydia Tombow Groff. Isaac is a hired farmhand.

No further Census work has been done for Catherine Tombow Wilson and her husband Robert. No Deed work has been done at this writing.

Robert Wilson died 4 January l893 in East Lampeter Township at the age of 74 years and one month, He is buried in Row 5, Mellinger's Mennonite Cemetery on Lincoln Highway in E. Lancaster, Pennsylvania, with his wife and other members of the Tombow Family.

The following obituary appeared in The Daily New Era, Friday, 6 January 1893:

"WILSON, January 4th, l893 in East Lampeter township, Robert Wilson, aged seventy-four years and one month.

The relatives and friends of the family are respectfully invited to attend the funeral, from his late residence, on Saturday morning at 9 o'clock, and at Mellinger's Meeting House at 9:30 o'clock. Interment at Mellinger's."

Catherine Tombow Wilson died on 8 May l9ll. The following obituary appeared in the Lancaster New Era, 9 May l9ll:

"Death of Mrs. Catherine Wilson

Mrs. Catherine Wilson, widow of Robert Wilson, of No. 224 E. Frederick street, died on Monday from general debility in her 86th year. Mr Wilson died l8 years ago, and no children survive. Deceased was a daughter of William and Mary Tombow, of near Witmer, where she was born. She made her home with a niece, Mrs, J. R. Givler. The deceased was a member of the Mennonite Church. The funeral will take place from Mrs. Givler's home at one o'clock on Thursday afternoon, and at two o'clock at Mellinger's Church along the Philadelphia turnpike."

On the next day, l0 May l9ll, the following obituary appeared in the Lancaster New Era, p. 5:

"WILSON In Lancaster, Catherine Wilson, widow of Robert Wilson, aged eighty-six years.

The relatives and friends of the family are respectfully invited to attend the funeral from the residence of the niece, Mrs J.R. Givler, No. 224 East Frederick street, on Thursday afternoon at one o'clock at the house and at two o'clock at Mellinger's Church"

Catherine Tombow's death certificate indicates that she died age 85 years, l0 months, and l5 days, of cerebral apoplexy (stroke). She had been paralyzed at the time of her death.

Her tombstone still stands commemorating her grave in Mellinger's Cemetery. With the passing of Catherine Tombow Wilson, the last of the old Tombow Family was gone. Between her father's birth in Holland in l787 to her death in l9ll in the city of Lancaster, Pennsylvania, three centuries are spanned in the space of those l24 years.

This line is believed extinct. On the basis of Census work and the obituaries of Robert and Catherine Wilson which mention no children or descendants, it is concluded that no children were born of this union or, if born, none survived to maturity.

No Will has been found in the Lancaster Court House for Robert or Catherine Wilson.
 
Wilson, Robert (I07330)
 
35 Clarence Tambeau was born l4 February l9l4, a twin to Peter Eugene ("Jack") Tambo, the eighth child of William Tambo and Elizabeth Fitzsimmons. He was a still born twin, according to his sister Pearl, who would have been ll years old at his birth. No evidence of his existence as been found as he died before he could be baptized at St. Patrick's in Olyphant, PA. However, Pearl Tambeau has proven to be an unusually reliable historian of family anecdotes. Tambo, Clarence (I04178)
 
36 Elizabeth Romayne ("Pearl") Tambo, the third child of William Tambo and Elizabeth Fitzsimmons was born l9 July l903 in Olyphant and baptized at St. Patrick's Church. It is in her home that her parents spent their final years in Scranton, PA.

Following her younger brother, Leo, to Michigan in l936, she lived in many homes before settling at l344 Mayburn, Dearborn. She subsequently sold this home to her daughter, Ruth, and moved to Mason St. in west Dearborn.

Pearl married twice. She married for the first time to Lewis Smith in St. Patrick's Church, Olyphant, on 26 July l922. Lewis Smith was born l9 April l902 in Olyphant, PA., the son of Holis Smith and Jane Harris. He died 4 January l976 in Ocala, Florida. His remains were cremated. This marriage ended in divorce. There were three children of this marriage.

Pearl married a second time to Raymond Popowski in the Dearborn (MI) City Hall on 20 December l947. There were no children of this marriage.

Pearl Tambeau Popowski died 24 May l974 of several strokes and heart attacks, spending the last seversal months comatose, a fate so many of her maternal grandmother Anna Joyce Fitzsimmons' descendants shared, including Pearl's three brothers. She is buried in St. Hedwig Cemetery, Dearborn Heights, MI, in Section 3D, six graves from her brother Leo Tambeau's grave, who had suffered a similar death, l6 months before. She was 7l years old at the time of her death.

Pearl Tambeau and Lewis Smith had three children: Ruth Smith, Lois Smith and a still born, noted in the Family Bible only as "Baby Smith". 
Tambo, Elizabeth Romayne ("Pearl") (I04150)
 
37 Her parents lived at 833 Greenwood Av., Toledo, OH. LaVoy, Jacqueline Marie (I01769)
 
38 I am not sure if I sent this one to you already or not so here is another obituary of Sister Gerald LaVoy


LAVOY, M. Gerald - SFGate
May 19, 2010 ... Sister M. Gerald LaVoy, O.P. Sister Gerald LaVoy, a Dominican Sister of San Rafael, ... by her brothers, Monsignor Elwood LaVoy and Col. ...
articles.sfgate.com/2010-05-19/news/20904239_1_dominica... articles.sfgate.com/2010-05-19/news/20904239_1_dominican-sisters-center-dominican-college-lady-of-lourdes-convent


Carol Arens 
LaVoy, Anna Louise (I01481)
 
39 Julia Adelaide LaVoy II, known as Julia, was born April 3, 1893, at Stateline according to her obituary. She married Elroy Deszell 30 November 1911 at St. Joseph Church, Erie, MI. She died 14 January 1964, Berkley, MI. LaVoy, Julia Adelaide II (I00193)
 
40 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Smith, Lois Joyce (I04153)
 
41 Mabel I. LaVoy, 87 yrs, of Temperance, MI, formerly of Deerfield, MI, died November 27, 2010. Friends may call at the Capaul Funeral Home, Ida, MI, Monday, from 7-9 PM, and Tuesday from 11 AM to 9 PM. The Rosary will be recited on Tuesday evening at 7:30PM in the funeral home. She will lie in state at St Alphonsus Catholic Church, Deerfield, Wednesday, from 10 AM until the Mass of Resurrection at 11 AM. Fr. Jack Loughran will officiate. Burial will be in St. Alphonsus Cemetery, Deerfield.


Born August 28, 1923, in Tipton, MI, Mabel was the daughter of James C. and Rena S. (French) Dawson. A Deerfield High School Graduate, she received Bachelor's and Master's Degrees in Education from Siena Heights University. She was a teacher in the Ida Middle School for 36 years, retiring in 1985. She had previously taught in Caswell and Federman Schools. Mabel and Harry LaVoy were married in June 1953, in St. Alphonsus Church, Deerfield. Mrs. LaVoy was active in the Ida Education Association, serving as President , Vice President, Secretary, and Building Representative. She was also active in her church as a Reader, a member of the Altar Society, and singing in the choir. She enjoyed her hobbies, such as reading, handicrafts, flowers, swimming, watercolor painting, and traveling.



Survivors include: sons, Augustine F. "Gus" , Anthony Thyros, Gregory (Karen); daughter, Renee (Christopher) Forche; sister, Inez (Richard) Moomey; grandchildren, Holly, Clayton, Oliver, Jessica, Jacqueline, Adam; and great-grandchildren, Emilee, Mason, and Mya. She was preceded in death by her husband, Harry; a son, John; and a sister, Vera Dawson. Memorial contributions for Mrs. LaVoy may be made to: Hospice of Northwest Ohio.

Online condolences may be sent to: www.capaulfuneralhome.com.



Source:

Toledo Blade

30 Nov. 2010
 
Dawson, Mabel I. (I01762)
 
42 Mary Romayne Williams was married as a minor who was actually 15 years old, not 18, as her marriage certificate suggests. Further details can be found under her husband WilliamTambo's entry. She was baptized at Holy Rosary Church, Scranton, PA.  Williams, Mary Romayne (I04158)
 
43 Peter Eugene ("Jack") Tambo AKA Tambeau, the seventh child of William Tambo, Sr., and Elizabeth Fitzsimmons, was born l4 February l9l4 Olyphant, PA. According to his older sister, Pearl, born in l903, he was a twin of Clarence Tambo, a still born infant. Peter Eugene was always known to relatives by the nick names of "Jack" or "Jake". He was baptized in St. Patrick's Church, Olyphant, PA.

He came to Michigan, with his older brother, Leo Thomas Tambeau, probably in the summer of l936. Leo's close friend, Tony Criscera, reports that the two brothers worked their way from Olyphant, PA, to Detroit, MI in an old "jalopy", working as pickers in the celery fields New York State as one of the jobs they had along the way to earn expenses.

Jack Tambeau married twice: (l) to Florence Haggerty and (2) to Tillie Koropchak.

Jack Tambeau died ll January l982 in Royal Oak, MI of a stroke. He had had three heart attacks. He is buried in White Chapel Cemetery, Troy, MI.

(l) Jack married Forence Haggerty, the daughter of John Haggerty and Mary Ann Jordan, on ll April l942 in Detroit, MI. Florence ("Flo") was born 2l March l9l5 in Scranton , PA. Prior to their marriage they lived in a common law relationship. Subsequent to their marriage, they divorced.

Jack Tambeau and Florence Haggerty had one son, Leo-Jack Tambeau.

Jack Tambeau married a second time to Tillie Koropchak l5 November l946 in the old Dearborn City Hall. Tillie Koropchak was the daughter of Steve Koropchak and Sonya Futack, who were born in Chernoke, Austria, as were Tillie's grandparents. The Koropchaks are of Russian descent. Tillie Koropchak was born 8 January l9l3 in Fayette, PA.

Jack and Tillie Tambeau's residence was at 28057 Sutherland. Southfield, MI, where they raised their children in one of the first homes in the area. Jack built his own home. His widow still resides there as of l992.

Jack Tambeau and Tillie Koropchak had two children: Peter John and Tamra Ann Tambeau.

II-l-l-7-2: Peter John Tambeau was born 7 September l949 in Pontiac, MI. Peter married three times: (l) to Linda Lee McDaniel; (2) to Jill Susan Tracy; and (3) to Nancy Morrison.

(l) Peter John Tambeau married Linda Lee McDaniel, the daughter of Calvin McDaniel and Marcy Benn, on 3 January l967 in Royal Oak, MI. Linda Lee McDaniel was born 2l February l950 in Birmingham, MI. Divorced. Peter John Tambeau and Linda Lee McDaniel had two children: Brian Keith and Kim Marie Tambeau.

II-l-l-7-2-l: Brian Keith Tambeau, born 3l October l967, Southfield, MI. Brian married Jill Holland l2 May l989 in the First Presbyterian Church, Mt. Clemens, MI. Brian manages a Taco Bell in Clinton Township, MI. Brian and Jill reside at 44430 Bayview Av., Clinton Township, MI. They have one son:

II-l-l-7-2-l-l: Brandon Tambeau, born ll December l990, Mt. Clemens, MI.

II-l-l-7-2-l: Kim Marie Tambeau, born l3 February l97l, Southfield, MI. Single. Manages a Taco Bell, Clinton Twp., MI. Resides: l0l2 Helen Lane, Madison Hgts., MI.

(2) Peter John Tambeau married a seond time to Jill Susan Tracy, the daughter of Leslie Warren Tracy and Wilhemina Ann VerHaulst, on 26 August l978 in Mt. Clemens, First Presbyterian Church. Peter and Jill Tambeau resided at 9l95 Maynard Ct., Pearl Beach, MI. Peter and Jill divorced. They had one son:

II-l-l-7-2-3: Chad Eric Tambeau, born 26 November l979, St. Claire, MI. He resides with his remarried mother, Jill Fisher, at l0223 Widgeon Way, Newport-Richey, Florida.

(3) Peter John Tambeau married a third time to Nancy Morrison 29 January l982 in Port Huron, MI. Nancy was born 5 October l952 in Mt. Clemens, MI, the daughter of Leo Robert Morrison and Joyce Williams. No Children. They reside at 9l95 Maynard Ct, Pearl Beach, MI.

II-l-l-7-3: Tamra Ann Tambeau, the second child of Jack Tambeau and Tillie Koropchak, was born l3 February l97l in Southfield, MI. Married and divorced Jerry Shea. No Children. Resides at 205 6th St., Apt. l84,Traverse City, MI.She has resided in Traverse City for many years. 
Tambeau, Peter Eugene ("Jack") (I04089)
 
44 Robert B. Ross, editor of "The Knaggs Family of Ohio and Michigan", p. 27., indicates his name is Alxis B. Knaggs, but churh records indicate he is Alexander Knaggs. See wife's entry for differences between St. Joseph's Marriage Records and Ross. His birth date extrapolated from his age at marriage: 34 in 1891.

His brother Rollie Knaggs states tha his brothr Alex was so rotund a man that he weighed mor that his wife and five small children. His wife weighed 100 pounds, but he weighed about 240 pounds.

Fred LaVoy said of his step Uncle Alex Knaggs that he was buried in St. Joseph's Cemetery, Erie, MI, in an unmarked grave next to his brohter Victor Knaggs. 
Knaggs, Alexander (I09653)
 
45 Ruth Smith was born 8 July l923 in Dickson City, PA. She came with her mother to Michigan and was raised in Dearborn, MI. She married Edmund Stanley Miekstyn on 27 June l942 in St. Clement's Church in Dearborn, MI. Edmund Stanley Miekstyn was born 29 September l9l9 in Hamtramck, MI., the son of Anthony Miekstyn and Mary Ethel Folta. During their life time they lived at l344 Mayburn, Dearborn, MI. Ruth Smith Miekstyn died 30 January l988 of pancreatic cancer, age 64, followed by her husband two weeks later on l6 February. They are buried in St Hedwig Cemetery.

Ruth Smith and Edmund Miekstyn had four children: Gail, Michael and fraternal twins, Daniel and David Miekstyn. 
Smith, Ruth Smith (I04152)
 
46 Walter Morrison was living at 336 W. Pearl, Hazel Park, MI. Morrison, Walter Jr (I00348)
 
47 William Tambo, Sr.

II-l-l William Tambo was the only child of Samuel R. Tombo and Frances Alwilda Lake. He was born l2 April l866 in Carbondale, Pennsylvania, a suburb of Scranton, in the heart of the anthracite coal mining district of Pennsylvania. Barely two years old, he lost his father while the latter was undergoing surgery to amputate his leg.

William's mother remarried a year and a half later on Christmas Day, l869 to a coal miner of Welsh descent, named Nicolas Johns. William did not spend his childhood in Carbondale, but in Carbon County, His mother and step-father may have moved there as early as l870 as a search of the l870 Federal Census, noted earlier in this history, does not reveal their whereabouts in Luzerne County.

The family is found in the l880 Census in Carbon County, Yorktown, Banks Township, dwelling #l08 (p. l3), on l June l880 as follows:

Nicolas John, white male, age 44, by occupation an engineer, employed during the last five months, born in PA, parents born in Wales, reads and writes English.

Frances A. wife, white female, age 37, keeping house, born in Pa, parents born in NY, reads and writes English

William son, l5, white male, laborer, reads and writes, not in school , born in PA, parents born in PA

Ann daughter, white female, age 8, in school, reads and writes, born in PA, parents born in PA.

Elizabeth daughter, white female, age 6, in school reads and writes born in PA, parents born in PA

Oral tradition among the writer's aunts recalls Ann Johns as their father's half sister, but is silent on Elizabeth.

In l882, William's mother files her pension papers in Audenreid, Carbon County. Oral tradition indicated that Hazleton and McAdoo were part of William Tambo's boyhood. These two cities are very close to Audenreid.

Fred Benckman's History of Carbon County, Pennsylvania, pp. l67 et seq., states that Banks township owes its settlement wholly to underlying coal deposits. None of the soil is arable, or capable of being farmed. The mining and stripping of anthracite coal from that area was its sole industry. As the coal resources were exhausted, coal operations proceeded westward along the Banks Township coal vein through the towns of Colerain, Jeanesville, Tresckow, and Yorktown. Yorktown and Audenreid were neighboring towns with Audenreid extending in Schuylkill County. McAdoo is just south of Audenreid in Schuylkill County. Thomas Johnson and Co. ran coal mines in the area in l878 and The Lehigh & Wilkes-Barre Co. had operations in Audenreid.

William, then, must have been employed as a coal miner at the age of l4, his correct age at the time of the l880 Census.

By l890 William was back in Olyphant, a town neighboring his birthplace, Carborndale, as his mother files a second application for his father's pension, using Olyphant as her mailing address.

A few notices from his bachelor days in the l890's have come into the hands of the writer. The newspaper articles give an idea of his penchant for jokes and pranks. They appeared in the now defunct Olyphant Gazette under "Grassy Items". (Grassy, or Grassy Patch, was a hillside section of Olyphant where William Tambo's home stands to this day.)

"Tambo has gone to India to look for work." O.G., l July l893

"Mr Wm. Tambo has returned and is at his post once more. He reports having a first class time." O.G., July, l893

"Wm Tambo says he had a fine time the other evening and the boys will not find out who his new girl is this time." O.G., 4 August l894

It is said that the back issues of this newspaper were not preserved. If such be the case, then these are the only glimpses available to us of the family in those days of this nature.

William Tambo married Elizabeth Fitzsimmons, daughter of Peter Fitzsimmons and Anna Joyce, who also resided in the Grassy Patch area of Olyphant.

They were married on 8 June l899 by an alderman, Myron Kasson, according to Lackawanna County Court records. In this record, William spells his name "Tombow". Elizabeth signs her names as "Fitzsumons".

It is not known when they were married in the Catholic Church as neither St. James Catholic Church in Jessup, where their first daughter, Frances was baptized, nor St. Patrick's in Olyphant, where all of their other children were baptized, have a record of their marriage. As both died Catholics, their marriage would have been solemnized in the Catholic Church.

In the l900 Census, William Tambo is listed as a laborer who had been out of work for three months. The coal miners were on strike during this period of time.

In the l9l0 and l920 Censuses, as well as on his death certificate, he is referred to as an engineer, the same occupation as his step-father, Nicolas Johns.

The term "engineer" in the context of coal mining refers to a position held by a man who ran a "locy", as the slang of the time called it, that is, a miniture locomotive engine which pulled loaded coal cars out of the mine. At that point the unusable part of the coal, called "culm", was separated out.

William worked for the Hudson Coal Company or a subsidiary thereof. The
foundation of the building where he worked the "locy" (Short for locomotive) could still be seen in the early l980's in a ravine visible from the 600 block of S. Valley Ave. in Olyphant on the east side of the road.

William's working partner is said by local residents to have been a man named "John the Hun", because of his Hungarian extraction.

Not far from the ravine, where the locomotive building once stood, to the southeast, one could see ten years ago a low mountain of culm, then covered with trees and underbrush, that, no doubt, in part, was created by the efforts of William Tambo and John the Hun.

In l900, William and Elizabeth lived in Jessup, another neighboring town. They lived there long enough to have their first child, Frances Tambo, baptized in St. James Church on l8 March l900. They were the tenants of a widow, named Margaret Cummings, aged 73.

Shortly thereafter they moved to the address that would be their home for most of their lives, ll4 School St., in the Grassy Patch section of Olyphant, with one short exception in the l920's according to the writer's Aunt Pearl Tambeau. The house is a large, white, two-storey home.

Lincoln School where their children would attend school was nearby at end of the street. A mile and half away was the Bird's Eye Mine where William worked and where is warm lunch was brought on a daily basis by his older boys, Willie and Leo (the writer's father).

Bringing the lunch to their father in his stationary locomotive building was an easy matter as it was down hill all the way. Returning home was another matter with many diversions along the way to ease the burden of the return trip for the small boys.

Physically, William Tambo appears to be a tall, strongly built man form the one picture that survives of him in the backyard of his home with his young family. He is described by relatives as having white hair and blue eyes. His eyes, especially the left one, were crossed. He had a broken nose, not well mended, the origin of which has several stories attached to it.

The most likely one, as told to this writer by his first cousin, William Sidney Tambeau, who had it of his maternal uncle, who was a specialist in family gossip, is that William said something to anger his wife, Elizabeth (or "Liza") while at the breakfast table. She took a poker from the nearby coal stove and cracked him across the face with it, "breaking his nose and crossing his eyes".

William is said to have replied that he would never get his nose fixed so that she could stare at it the rest of her days.

Attempts to confirm this version of events through two of his living children, Margaret (Aunt Peg) and Jack have led to two more contradictory versions: one version is that he slipped on the outside steps to the cellar while trying to get a neighbor's dog. A second version is that he broke his nose when he was knocked down by a constable, having become a little too rowdy on a Saturday night drinking spree.

William Tambo, otherwise, is described as a gentle giant who loved children. Nearly everyone who remembered him, spoke of his musical abilities and his love of children.

It is said that he often led the children of his wife's relatives and the neighbors in song around the parlor piano. One story, told the writ- er by William's niece, Mary Healey Gallagher, has it that on one such occasion, when the singing and joking had got a little out of hand, Liza, his wife, shook her fist at him, saying: "Will, if you don't catch my eye, you'll be catching my fist."

The same niece recalls that, when she was very young, her Uncle William held her head between his knees, rubbing her bright red hair furiously, and crying out: "Fire! Fire! Your Hair's on fire!"

Still another niece, Madeleine Robert Evans tells of coming over to her Aunt Liza's house one Sunday for dinner. She was greeted playfully at the front door by her Uncle Will with "Where's B........t?" (The Family term of endearment for Madeleine's father, George Roberts. Sr., because he used that word liberally in reply to people's statements to him.)

Madeleine answered her Uncle Will that at least her Dad was not cock- eyed. For taking the trouble to make this observation, she found herself chased down School Street by her Uncle.

William Tambo is described by his son, Peter Eugene ("Jack") Tambeau as an improviser of satirical songs of a political and social nature. He could only dimly remember a snatch of one when questioned: "The world was made in six days and finished on the seventh, but the contract read ll days." The allusion here is lost with time, but refers to a situation quite the opposite of the "cost over runs" so prevalent today in government contracts.

William's ability to create satirical songs was well rewarded by his fellow workers on Saturday nights. According to his son, Jack, his father enjoyed red wine and every two weeks on pay day his wife, "Liza" gave him two dollars from his pay, which he tucked into his watch pocket, and off he went to O'Connor's, the neighborhood bar on N. Valley St., in Grassy Patch, where he would use his money to buy his first drinks. Thereafter he would sing for his drinks, a one man band, using a harmonica strapped to his head, while playing the the bar room piano, and singing his satirical improvisations.

In l979 the writer visited the home of Mr. and Mrs. Claphorn who lived at the south end of School St. near the Tambo Family. They still used a wood burning stove to cook and heat their house, as was more common in the earlier days in the homes of Grassy Patch.

Behind the Claphorn home, where a garage would be on a corner lot, a small building still stood which was once call "Sprag Shanty". It was so called after the spraggers, railroad men who slowed the railroad cars down by throwing sprags, or sticks, in the wheels. These men would come to the Store to buy sweets.

Here also William Tambo would come, states Mr. Claphorn who ran the store, to buy his wife a favorite summer treat, ice cream and ginger ale. Mr Claphorn remembers one occasion when William came for his wife's treat. William took his recently purchased gallon of ice cream and gallon of ginger ale in hand and began to dance with them as Mr. Claphorn played an Irish jig on the old Victrola in the Shanty.

The memories of William's acquaintances, relatives and children, as well as the newspaper clippings cited above, are all sunny ones. He seemed to possess an innate charm and sense of fun that made him a favorite of those who knew him.

But he had a serious side too. In l905, six years after this grandson and great-grandson of Mennonites married his Irish Catholic wife, William began secret instruction in the Catholic Faith and on l2 October l905 he was baptized a Catholic and came home to surprise Liza with his announcement that he had converted to Catholicism. This must have been an immense relief to his wife, who would have been certain up to that point that no good could have come to Will in eternity in his previous heathen state. He was 39 years old at this time.

A search of the National Archives military records from l860 to l9l2 does not reveal that William was ever in the military service.

Throughout his life his occupations changed little. In the l880 Census of Carbon County, Pa., he is listed, at age l4, as a laborer, presumably in the coal mines. In l899 his marriage record in the Lackawanna Court House, states he is a firemen. In the l900 Census, city of Jessup, dwelling #70, he is listed as a day laborer. In the l9l0 Census, he is an engineer and coal breaker (Olyphant, dwelling #256). In the l920 Census he is listed as an engineer in a Coal Mine Company (Olyphant, dwelling #l05). On his death certificate in l929 he is listed as an engineer with the Hudson Coal Company.

As to the spelling of his name, four variants have been found in his marriage record, children's birth records, the Census, his Baptism record, and the newspaper articles. They include: Tombow, Tambo, Tambow, and Tamboo. And his children, under my father's leadership, all changed their name to Tambeau, with the exception of his older brother, William, who remained a Tambo throughout his life. However, even Uncle William's children and descendants style themselves as Tambeau. And this writer, believing himself to be French, modified the name to Tombeau at the age of l9 to conform with a French word. However, the writer's name now sounds like how other branches of the family spell and sound the name: Tombow. The French, ironically, would have the last to say in this matter with their cynical proverb: The more things change, the more they are the same.

The home of the Tambo Family at ll4 School St., in Olyphant, was a "company home", that is, a home rented from the Hudson Coal Co., where William worked. This was a typical practice in those days and is reflected in the once popular song "I owe my soul to the Company Store".

The writer's Aunt Peg Tambeau Diven said that in the mid l920's the home suddenly settled in the middle of the night, as the result of mine excavations, leaving a crack in the exterior wall from the top to the bottom of the house through which snow blew that winter.

This was a common place event in those days of active coal mining when little regard was given to the safety of those who worked and lived in the area.

Others have reported even graves sinking and delivering up their contents to the men mining below, so shallow were the mine tunnels under the earth.

A major intersection of Olyphant collapsed in l903, taking buildings and the road with it.

To this day there are still sudden sinkings of the ground although active mining has ceased for many years.

William Tambo entered Mid Valley Hospital in Scranton, PA., in late November of l929. Late in the evening of l8 December l829, at ll pm, he expired. His death was attributed to stomach cancer. He was 63 years old. His last address was 442 Main St., Blakely.

His only other recorded hospitalization in Mid Valley Hospital was in March of l924 for lobar pneumonia.

He is buried in St. Patrick's Cemetery in Blakely, in an unmarked grave, next to Liza, high on a hill, overlooking the Lackawanna Valley, where he spent most of his adult life.

This Cemetery is located off Highway 6. His grave is in Section P, plot 39, below the Flood Family monument and to the right of the Gibbons' grave markers.

A single culinary tradition has survived in our family: a soup my father called "chinken-chonken". It is a thin cheese soup with finely chopped onions, said by my father to have been passed on to him by his father. However, other branches of the Tombow Family have not carried on this tradition. Perhaps it is of Welsh derivation as William was raised by a Welsh step-father from the age of three. The recipe for this unusual soup resides now in the hands of the writer's sister, Anne Tambeau Travis, who has taken on herself the burden of this family tradition.

As an inheritance from the Irish side of the family, four of the five children who survived into adulthood had trouble with alcohol, three severely and one moderately.

In looks, their son Jack most favored his father and inherited the "big ears" associated with Tombows in the more distant branches of the family. (The descendants of John Tombow of E. Greenville, Ohio, report this trait among some of their members.) Three of the children, Pearl, Peg and my father, Leo Tambeau, favored their mother in their looks and body Their son, William Tambo, was stocky of build and so probably more closely favored his father in that regard.

The Descendants of William Tambo, Sr., and Elizabeth Fitzsimmons

William Tambo (Sr.) and Elizabeth Fitzsimmons had ten children, according to their daughter, Pearl Tambeau, who has proven to be an excellent source of accurate family history. Not all of these children can be accounted for by public records because their lives were short and record keeping poor at the turn of the Century in Lackawanna County, PA, where the family grew up in the Grassy Patch section of Olyphant, a community of homes built on the slopes of a hill overlooking the Lackawanna Valley.

These children were in order of their birth: Frances Tambo, Ann Tamboo, Elizabeth ("Pearl") Tambo, who later styled herself, Tambeau, William Tambo, Leo Thomas Tambo, who later styled himself Tambeau, Margaret ("Peg") Tambo, who later styled herself Tambeau, Peter Eugene ("Jack") Tambo, who later styled himself Tambeau, Clarence Tambo, Jack's still-born twin, Thomas Woodrow Tambo, and Mary Tambo.

Of these ten children, five survived into adult years to raise children: Elizabeth ("Pearl"), William ("Willie"), Leo Thomas ("Shorty"), Peter Eugene ("Jack") and Margaret ("Marguerite" or "Peg").

The formal names of these ten children present an interesting blend of traditional family names and politics. The eldest, Frances, was named after her paternal grandmother. The next child, Ann, was named after the maternal grandmother. William Tambo, Sr.'s half sister was also named Ann. The third child, Elizabeth, was named after her mother. William also had another half sister named Elizabeth. The fourth child and first son, by tradition should have been named "Samuel" after the paternal grandfather, but instead was named "William" after his father: perhaps this occurred because William Tambo, Sr., never knew his father Samuel, being only two years old at the time of his father's death.

Several other children were also named after maternal aunts, uncle and grandfather: Peter Eugene ("Jack") was christened after his Uncle and Grandfather, both of whom shared the name of Peter Fitzsimmons. Margaret and Mary were named after their maternal aunts Margaret Fitzsimmons Coulthard and Mary Fitzsimmons Dunnigan.

But three of the children's names reflect political convictions: Clarence, Thomas Woodrow, and Leo Thomas. Clarence was no doubt named after Clarence Darrow and Thomas Woodrow after President Thomas Woodrow Wilson. Both of these latter men were prominent national leaders who supported the unionization of the coal miners.

My father, Leo, was named, according to family tradition after, Pope Leo XIII, who died in l903, five years before my father was born. But William Tambo, Sr., newly converted to Catholicism in l905, had no doubt come across the social teachings of Pope Leo in his encyclical, Rerum Novarum. This encyclical dwelled on the inequities in modern times between employers and employees as the result of the widespread and rapid development of capitalism. In his encyclical, Pope Leo clearly enunciated the role of the government to be that of ensuring that laws were passed that workers would get decent wages and working conditions: a theme close to the hearts of coal miners in the early Twentieth Century and continuing to this day in the last decade of the Twentieth Century.

In l980, Elizabeth Fitzsimmons had a total of 86 descendants. In those descendants there were five sets of twins, or five times the number expected in 86 births. 
Tombow, William Tambo (I03710)
 
48 "Red" graduated from Dearborn High School and lived in Fowler, MI, most of his life where he was a member of Most Holy Trinity Catholic Church and a lector there.

He entered the U.S. Army in December, 1944 and received infantry basic training at Camp Hood, TX. He was assigned to the 40th infantry division in the Philippines and served on Leyte Panary and Los Negros befored being transferred to the Medical Corp in May, 1945. In this branch of service, he attained the rank of technician 4th grade and was subsequently attached to the 40th Infantry Divsion to serve in Korea until honorable discharge in November 1946.

He was also a member of the Knights of Columbus, Fowler Conservation Club, and VFW, Post #3733. He worked for Fisher Body. (M.E.N. obit)

He was a farmer at the time of his marriage according to the certificate. 
Reaume, Elwood Maxim "Red" (I00830)
 
49 (Information for Gillette Chaigne, her parents, and her grand parents was obtained from the following rootsweb site: http://wc.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=rbrtslm&id=I448 (History of the Roberts and Trudeau Families of Michigan)
Entries: 37411 Updated: 2006-05-08 18:11:22 UTC (Mon) Contact: Lawrence Roberts Home Page: Ancestry of Lawrence Michael Roberts e-mail: Lmroberts@earhtlink.com.) 
Chaigne, Pierre pere (I10328)
 
50 (Information for Gillette Chaigne, her parents, and her grand parents was obtained from the following rootsweb site: http://wc.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=rbrtslm&id=I448 (History of the Roberts and Trudeau Families of Michigan)
Entries: 37411 Updated: 2006-05-08 18:11:22 UTC (Mon) Contact: Lawrence Roberts Home Page: Ancestry of Lawrence Michael Roberts e-mail: Lmroberts@earhtlink.com.) 
Belleau, Marie (I10329)
 

      1 2 3 4 5 ... 43» Next»